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You Are What You Eat?

dollylama

dollylama

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Apr 18, 2008
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I was watching an episode of The Doctors earlier today and it's the 'you are what you eat' episode. Apparently, there are foods out there that can really enhance your mood and integrating them into my daily diet could improve my lifestyle tremendously.

Do you believe that you are what you eat? What sort of foods work for you and make you feel refreshed and happy? I don't like supplements and other drugs to enhance my mood so I really want to try the natural stuff that works.

Please share your food tips with me, thanks! :)
 
J

jamesdean

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I have to eat little n often I cannot digest fruit or vegetables sometinmes I just have to eat because my sugar levels are falling n I dont enjoy the food I eat mostly sandwichs so for me the lovelist food is a mcdonalds I went for an italian meal recently for my cousins 40th n I knew I would be poorly because the food was to rich has much has it was nice, I loved my friut n vegables aswell, never mind so a mcdonalds cheers me up, Als I am a quLIFIED CHEF SO i USED TO LOVE ALL KINDS OF FOOd THAT i cooked BUT GOD HELP ME IF i EVER COVERED THE BREAKFAST SHIFT i WOULD EAT ALL THE SAUSAGES N YET NOW i CANNOT STOMACH A COOKED BREAKFAST isnt it strange how are taste buds change over time its like I hated neopolitan ice cream has child n I love it now.
 
dib4uk

dib4uk

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Hmm well in that case then yeah it is. I cant cook to save my life, I eat junk food most of the time- although i cant afford it to be honest.

So can exercise, motivation, good self esteem and a good job without having negative co-workers... however, for some people thats not the real life.

If you cant eat the standard recommended dose of fruit and veg- try and go half way?
 
gray

gray

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Jul 23, 2009
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89
It's the old aged "everything in moderation" saying and having a "balanced diet".

Examples:

Dark chocolate is good for your heart and preventing cancer when eaten in moderation, but if you stuff your face full of it you'll end up fat. Overweight people have more chance of cancer and heart conditions so... the moral is eat it in moderation or you will do more harm than good :p

Water is very good for your body though it is actually possible to poison yourself by drinking too much of it (admittedly it is an insane amount).

Caffeine is a stimulant that can lift you out of a tired state and is also very good for your heart. However having too much of it can intoxicate you sending you on a manic episode. Many people are unaware how much caffeine they consume in a day, it doesn't just reside in your coffee, it is also in your tea, energy drinks and very often any type of fizzy drink.
 
G

GrizzlyBear

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Water is very good for your body though it is actually possible to poison yourself by drinking too much of it (admittedly it is an insane amount).
Last year a teenage boy nearly died in my Town after drinking a lot of water to ease his toothache. Many years ago when I had agonizing toothache I too found icy cold water my only relief (whilst waiting for my appointment!)....but after a litre or so I started spitting it out. This kid just kept drinking it all day. But even so....maybe not such an insane amount. :eek:

To answer the OP:

Some foods are believed to be particularly helpful:

Lettuce (mild tranquillizing effect)

TRADITIONAL HERBAL USES AND MEDICINAL PROPERTIES
Wild lettuce is a natural sedative, it is very good for an over-excited nervous system. It is particularly good for hyperactive children, and can be of considerable help with symptoms of over-excitement or inability to sleep.
Known as "lettuce opium" it is also helpful for adults who suffer from insomnia, restlessness, anxiety or neurosis.

Bananas

Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin - known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

Oats

Are often used to treat insomnia, stress, anxiety, depression and nervous exhaustion.

Raw Cocoa Powder

●Phenylethylamine (PEA) is found in chocolate. PEA is an adrenal-related chemical that is also created within the brain and released when we are in love. This is one of the reasons why love and chocolate have a deep correlation. PEA also plays a role in increasing focus and alertness. Researchers have discovered that phenylethylamine (PEA) has a positive effect in enhancing feelings of love. And Chocolate has been proven to be an excellent source of PEA.

●Anandamide (The Bliss Chemical) - A neurotransmitter called anandamide, has been isolated in cacao. Anandamide is also produced naturally in the brain. Anandamide is known as "The Bliss Chemical" because it is released while we are feeling great. Cacao contains enzyme inhibitors that decrease our bodies' ability to breakdown anandamide. This means that natural anandamide and/or cacao anandamide may stick around longer, making us feel good longer, when we eat cacao.

I guess that whether or not we agree with all the claims it certainly doesn't hurt me when I have porridge or muesli for breakfast - lunch with a lettuce based salad followed by a raw cocoa sprinkled banana split! (With some chopped nuts and drizzled maple syrup on top....:drool:)
 
S

schizzzoid

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I recently bought a 'smoothie maker' into which I pile frozen rasp/black/strawberries and apple juice (very cheap at Farmfoods - not the best of quality tho'!), it makes a great noise, and produces a nice purple slop, which certainly does you give a healthy 'buzz'!
 
daffy

daffy

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I dont know if anyone else does this but i go thru phases of food and become quite obsessive about them. I will eat them anything from 2 weeks to 2 months then it will change to another food. Its much worse when im depressed. My eating habits at the moment are appalling, all im eating is shredded wheat and fruit. I try to eat other foods but my appetite is just not there for them. I did have an ED for 12 years when i was younger, so i guessed thats where its stemmed from. Fortunatly i dont like chocolate so thats not been a problem , so far :)

Anyone else do this?
 
A

Apotheosis

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The nocebo effect

When western anthropologists first heard reports of witch doctors who could issue deadly curses, they quickly found rational explanations. The families of the cursed often felt there was no point wasting food on the "walking dead", for example. That's why many of the cursed would die: simple starvation.

However, other case histories have come to light that defy attempts to explain them. In the 1970s, for example, doctors diagnosed a man with end-stage liver cancer, and told him he had just a few months to live. Though the patient died in the predicted time, an autopsy showed the doctors had been mistaken. There was a tiny tumour, but it had not spread. It seemed the doctors' prognosis had been a death curse.

Though the mechanism remains a mystery, but at least now this kind of phenomenon has a name. The "nocebo effect" is the lesser-known opposite number of the placebo effect, and describes any case where putting someone in a negative frame of mind has an adverse effect on their health or well-being. Tell people a medical procedure will be extremely painful, for example, and they will experience more pain than if you had kept the bad news to yourself. Similarly, experiences of side effects within the placebo groups of drug trials have shown that a doctor's warning about the possible side effects of a medicine makes it much more likely that the patient will report experiencing those effects.

This is not just in the mind: it is also about physical effects. The stress created by the nocebo effect can have a long-lasting impact on the heart, for example – perhaps serious enough to cause fatal damage.

The race is on to understand the precise mechanisms behind nocebo. Medical researchers are hoping that such an understanding will help to make the world a less stressful place. "It is a good way to understand anxiety, and to find methods to prevent it," says Fabrizio Benedetti of the University of Turin, Italy.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20327247.100-13-more-things-the-nocebo-effect.html
 
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