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  • Safety Notice: This section on Psychiatric Drugs/Medications enables people to share their personal experiences of using such drugs/medications. Always seek the advice of your doctor, psychiatrist or other qualified health professional before making any changes to your medications or with any questions you may have regarding drugs/medications. In considering coming off psychiatric drugs it is very important that you are aware that most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should only be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision.

Would you take it? (Given a choice)

B

bigpharma

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Joined
Nov 12, 2008
Messages
4
No, I would not take it. As someone who experienced MH difficulties for the majority of her adult life (so far!), I'm glad that I got help from a fabulous counsellor who helped me deal with my issues that led to me being depressed. It might sound strange, but I wish I had the contentment and insight that I now have without having to go through all the crap that I did, but I truly believe that I am only where I am BECAUSE of it. Sometimes we need to go through the bad times to experience the good times, and while that may sound like a cliche, I don't say it lightly. I've had some really dark times and I know I will not go back there. Would I feel the same satisfaction if I'd taken a pill? - prob not, as its the journey, not the destination that holds the biggest reward
all the more stonger for it, I love to hear of other people who are all the more stronger for their life expereiences, there is nothing more satisfying. the couselors i spke to where the most possitive aspect to anything offered, they where human, and i love them for it
 
R

ramboghettouk

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Jan 7, 2008
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london
Some people like me don't have the resources for anything but drugs given the choice, i haven't been given that choice

I also feel annoyed when people lecture me on the evils of drugs, when unlike me they have the resources for alternatives, one mind guy was on about ideal worlds well he unlike me has the money to live in such an ideal world

By the way i even managed to be chucked out of socialist worker, they said i was sexist for chatting up the women
 
A

Achlys

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2008
Messages
8
red or blue pill

Its a bit like the film, The Matrix.
Take the blue or red pill...

I dunno what I'd do

Give me the red pill and let Kansas go bye-bye! In a heartbeat.

Perhaps alot of who I am is because of what ive experienced. But I wouldnt need time to weigh any of that up to know my decision.
 
Bluemoon

Bluemoon

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Dec 18, 2007
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494
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I think I would take it, at 30 I just want this illness to be over so I can get on and live my life to the full. I want the best chance of finding my soul mate as well and even having children - which, because of my current state of mind and circumstances, doesn't seem likely to happen. Not in this village where I live anyway. Also, because I know my situation is hurting my parents and my brother and taking such a pill would end that too.

However. . .

It's a bit like that scene in Total Recall where that doctor gives Arnold Swartzathingy's character a pill to give him an escape from his "situation". If I see a bead of sweat rolling down the doc's face as he gives me such a pill, I'll make sure to spit it back out - but unlike Arnie - I won't try to put a hole in his head for his trouble :LOL: (y).
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
It's a bit like that scene in Total Recall where that doctor gives Arnold Swartzathingy's character a pill to give him an escape from his "situation". If I see a bead of sweat rolling down the doc's face as he gives me such a pill, I'll make sure to spit it back out - but unlike Arnie - I won't try to put a hole in his head for his trouble :LOL: (y).
Cool film, has to be a favourite - & one of the best scenes - "The Walls of Reality shall come crashing down"
 
Bluemoon

Bluemoon

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Cool film, has to be a favourite - & one of the best scenes - "The Walls of Reality shall come crashing down"
One of mine too :) - in fact, it's in my DVD collection. If you can call it a collection.
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
One of mine too :) - in fact, it's in my DVD collection. If you can call it a collection.
I saw the film 3 times at the cinema when it was released, & have seen it many times since - Philip K Dick was a genius & a favourite author of mine.
 
R

ramboghettouk

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Remember psychiatrist didn't approve og me watching total recall

Latest shrink says if i come of meds i'll become very ill, blame them for addicting me in the first place, they could have tried alternatives before using pills

I'm also angry they just offer pills and can't help thinking when they do see me it's just to check i'm taking them
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
Latest shrink says if i come of meds i'll become very ill, blame them for addicting me in the first place, they could have tried alternatives before using pills

I'm also angry they just offer pills and can't help thinking when they do see me it's just to check i'm taking them
I agree - there is plenty of evidence that many things benefit those with "severe mental illness" - before resorting to meds.

It sickens me how the system is in this country.
 
Bluemoon

Bluemoon

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Latest shrink says if i come of meds i'll become very ill, blame them for addicting me in the first place, they could have tried alternatives before using pills

I'm also angry they just offer pills and can't help thinking when they do see me it's just to check i'm taking them
I've always wondered why they don't study each individual by using fMRI scans and any other methods to find out what is actual going on - to find out what is working fine and what isn't. I know, the most obvious factors are money and time. I don't think medication should be the only way forward with the healing process and I'm lucky to have had CBT, counseling and psychotherapy. I even asked my doctor that if there are any research projects going on at any university or research center that needs a subject to study then I'll happily volunteer ( within reason ). He isn't aware of any ( probably locally anyway) that are asking for any although I was involved in some testing with a researcher from the nearby university this afternoon.
 
KP1

KP1

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1,500
Catch 22

If you come off meds for depression do you think you become depressed again or more depressed or is it the withdrawal problems of the meds??? I'd like to feel what I am really like again but don't know if it is worth the risk
KP:confused:
 
Z

zena

Guest
would i take the pill mm is it a sweet pillor a bitter one?or both, a delicious duality bittersweet as life itself. Could a pill really restore my innerself so invaded by marauding voices that invade my privacy and comment on my every action?
I think i will take it to Dantes Inferno and ask them at the gates of hell.:D
 
R

Roger Waldram

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Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
901
Location
33540 Caumont, Gironde, FRANCE
Changing a potential vicious cycle

If you come off meds for depression do you think you become depressed again or more depressed or is it the withdrawal problems of the meds??? I'd like to feel what I am really like again but don't know if it is worth the risk
KP:confused:
There can be a vicious cycle where coming off any regular drug (even caffeine) may produce a physical response, & a doctor response 'This shows you are not ready to come off medication'.
As a general rule of thumb it's a good idea to reduce medication by 1/10th for a few weeks, see how you go & the reduce by a further 1/10th & so on. Always check with your doctor.
There are several perspectives on depression and 'mental illness'. Here is another big chunk from my thesis
"Healy (2005, p. 164), a psychiatrist, comments

“These hypotheses and their derivatives (regarding monoamine theories) have dominated thinking on depression, particularly in popular books on depression or antidepressants or in articles fro magazines such as Cosmopolitan or Esquire, giving rise to a language about chemical imbalances. The truth, however, is that despite four decades of work there is still no convincing theory about what is wrong in depression, and no evidence for a chemical imbalance”.

However, Healy does say there is evidence that antidepressants do work although we do not know how. In my psychotherapy practice many clients on antidepressants do believe that ‘chemical imbalance’ for psychological disturbance is a ‘scientific fact’, hence my concerns and scepticism about the consequences of beliefs founded on doubtful epistemology. As a counter-point their faith in chemical imbalance and tablets perhaps needs respect similar to faith in gods, people or theories. Some depressed patients doubtless would prefer tablets rather than explore contributory factors. Breggin argues that it is wrong for doctors to treat body biochemistry out of the context of their patients' environment, and that depression is 'a natural response to living' (Breggin, 1993 p. 148)."

There are other perspectives but these may add to the confusion!
If you want to know more, the following website called 'Coming Off' (by a clinical psychologist who has) is great http://www.comingoff.com/.
There is also a good 'warts & all' book of user accounts of coming off medication (that may put you off the whole idea, but some of their meds are really 'heavy')-here's a link hopefully (!) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Coming-Psychiatric-Drugs-Antidepressants-Tranquillizers/dp/0954542800/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1227608622&sr=1-6

I hope some of this is useful,
All the best,

Roger
 
D

Duchess

Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Messages
16
Location
Essex
Initially I thought of course I would take it but not too sure having read through everyones thoughts on it.... Even more confused now. Am going to my GP tomorrow to seek help after being really suicidal for a while now. I just know he will fob me off with Citalopram and try and get rid of me. The last bad episode I had was four years ago and I admitted myself voluntarily to the local psychiatric unit. I came out feeling okay but have been on a down hill slide since. I have been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

Hope I am not rambling, I am so sad today.

Duchess.
 
Bluemoon

Bluemoon

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Dec 18, 2007
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494
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UK
Am going to my GP tomorrow to seek help after being really suicidal for a while now. I just know he will fob me off with Citalopram and try and get rid of me. The last bad episode I had was four years ago and I admitted myself voluntarily to the local psychiatric unit. I came out feeling okay but have been on a down hill slide since. I have been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

Hope I am not rambling, I am so sad today.

Duchess.
I'm sorry that your feeling so sad today - there are times when I feel really down to the point where I wish it was over. The thing is it may take days weeks or even months to feel better and for me, thinking about the time when I'm feeling happier helps me to cope. There is always light at the end of the tunnel no matter how long it may be. Although my illness is not related to depression I think the whole aspect of living with a mental illness can bring on depressive symptoms. My mum has Bi-polar disorder and I get the feeling that part of my problem is related to that.

Another thing is that I've got a really good doctor at the moment who listens to everything I have to say and allows me to reduce my medication etc if I want to try such things.

Lastly, please feel free to share whatever you wish here we are here to listen and help in anyway that we can (y).
 
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