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  • Safety Notice: This section on Psychiatric Drugs/Medications enables people to share their personal experiences of using such drugs/medications. Always seek the advice of your doctor, psychiatrist or other qualified health professional before making any changes to your medications or with any questions you may have regarding drugs/medications. In considering coming off psychiatric drugs it is very important that you are aware that most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should only be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision.

withdrawal side effects venlafaxine

KP1

KP1

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There are other sites with lots of comments on horrendous withdrawal from venlafaxine anti depressants. Has anyone got comment on these.
I have decided that I do not wish to continue with this AD and msybr this is not sensible am taking myself off it.I would never have gone on it if I had been in a position to read up on it before hand. There must be other AD that are effectivewithout these problems: brain shivers/electric shocks,nausea,dizzeyness return of suicidal thoughts etc etc.
It seems to me too easy to be put on these without careful discussion. I can't believe that there are not better options when there are so many ADs available.
 
nickh

nickh

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KP - really I strongly advise not withdrawing without medical advice. I know that sounds boring and official but it is true. If you want to change medication then your doctor should agree to do what you ask and manage the change in a considered way. Sorry to be so boringly responsible :).

Nick.
 
KP1

KP1

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I know people will think what youthink but I hate the stuff so much I can't take any more of it.
 
A

Apotheosis

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I know people will think what you think but I hate the stuff so much I can't take any more of it.
ALL psychiatric drugs have the potential to cause severe side effects in the long & short term. They also ALL have the potential to cause very severe withdrawal effects. In fact this is usually the norm. We all know the orthodox official line > MH problem? > Go see doctor > take drugs > keep taking them. Personally I see a problem with this. Not least is the fact that there are other ways people can be helped effectively; even with severe mental illness, & other methods have been proved to work. Not for everyone, but when there are alternatives I do believe very strongly that the patient should be given every opportunity to try other methods of recovery.

I know many people utterly dependant on psychiatric medication, I am too. In my own experience I was forced meds for many years with no alternative. I had known - drug [street] & alcohol problems, as well as numerous, difficult life situations. No help was ever offered in practically helping me with the real issues in my life. Had I been offered & given help with the difficulties in my life - I don't see that I would have necessarily needed to take psychiatric drugs. I successfully stopped psychiatric drugs completly on two separate occasions; without medical advice, for long periods of time. Unfortunately the difficulties I had kept bringing me back into contact with psych services. My position now is that I am utterly dependant on psych drugs to function - I can't come off; given my present circumstances & lack of support. It saddens me.

Yes I agree that for some prescription drugs are the answer, but I do not agree that for the majority they are. proper support, alternatives & practical assistance involving deep psychological help would help most people to get well. It would in the long run be cheaper, more effective & healthy. As things stand there are the few at the top with everything to gain, especially in a monetary sense. As with most things these few are happy to carve up the World at the cost to everyone else. I can't help but think that in a couple of hundred years, if the human race is still here, then we will look back at the psychiatric treatment of the mentally ill in these times; as having the same barbarism & with the same disgust as we presently look at the treatment of the mentally ill in the 1800's.

KP1 - try this very good site - & their guide to stopping meds.

http://theicarusproject.net/alterna...duction-guide-to-coming-off-psychiatric-drugs

If you want any more advice on stopping meds & links to other sites/information, then PM me. I researched in depth for 10 years this subject in a personal valiant attempt at stopping meds. I haven't wholly given up in wanting to be med free. But I accept that it may be the case that I have to take meds for life. I wish you all the best in whatever you decide to do.
 
D

Dollit

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Coming off antid's needs supervision from the person who prescribed them. You have to tail off in a controlled way or you could end up with another bunch of problems from stopping too fast.
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
Coming off antid's needs supervision from the person who prescribed them. You have to tail off in a controlled way or you could end up with another bunch of problems from stopping too fast.
Yes this is true. But in many cases there is no proper support or assistance for people wanting to come off meds from orthodox services. In many cases people attempt withdrawal without such supervision.

MIND has a great deal of very well researched & impartial information on this subject.

http://www.mind.org.uk/Information/..._if_my_doctor_doesn_t_agree_to_my_withdrawal_

In Mind's Coping with coming off study, people who didn't involve their doctor were just as likely to succeed in coming off as those who did.
What if my doctor doesn't agree to my withdrawal?

Although it's advisable to consult a doctor before coming off medication, many people don't do so, often because they feel that their doctor won't agree with their decision. Many people who talked to Mind agreed that getting professional help was important, but they found that, in practice, doctors were not very helpful. Many decided to come off medication against the advice of their doctors, or without involving them in the decision. When coming off, the most helpful people were those who had no role in prescribing their medication, including counsellors, other service users, self-help groups, and complementary therapists. Doctors seemed to be less concerned than service-users about the side effects of medication, less understanding of their desire to live without drugs, and more likely to doubt their ability to do so successfully.

It's been suggested that doctors and other professionals who have taken psychiatric medication themselves are more likely to be sympathetic to people wishing to come off and the difficulty of doing so. However, it seems rare for the doctor to be the one suggesting they come off.

One study* revealed how discouraging medical staff were to patients wanting to reduce their medication before coming out of hospital. This negative attitude seemed to harden as patients went on reducing their dose, even when there was no sign of any ill-effects and no deterioration in their condition. Staff would interpret any changes in behaviour, such as getting up late or refusing to attend activities, as a relapse of psychosis, rather than people wanting to take their lives back into their own hands. The study concluded that the attitudes and perceptions of the staff exerted just as much influence on the number of different drugs and the dose they were given as the patient's state of mind.

In Mind's Coping with coming off study, people who didn't involve their doctor were just as likely to succeed in coming off as those who did.
 
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