Why is "citalopram hydrobromide" not called "citalopram hydrofluoride"?

S

Shard

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#1
Why is "citalopram hydrobromide" not called "citalopram hydrofluoride"?

All I know is that fluorine and bromine are halogens.
 
Toasted Crumpet

Toasted Crumpet

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#2
Hi shard

Sorry no one has answered this.

I suspect it is a question only the manufacturers could know the answer to, or maybe a pharmacist.

:welcome: to the forum, sorry it's taken a while for someone to see your post and welcome you :redface:
 
N

NorasDad

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#4
All I know is that fluorine and bromine are halogens.
Fluorine, Bromine and Chlorine are often interchangable in chemistry. The acids based on all three are very strong and, I think, used to turn the drug into a salt, so it dissolves easily.

There's really no difference between a fluoride and a bromide in this case because they are attached to a molecule that's very big. They just combine with sodium in the body and float away, basically.