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Why are we so depressed?

B

Borderline

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Is there something in our environment? Something about the way society works? Depression was never so prevalent centuries ago. Is it the increasing complexity of life that's triggering it?
 
G

GrizzlyBear

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Is there something in our environment? Something about the way society works? Depression was never so prevalent centuries ago. Is it the increasing complexity of life that's triggering it?
I think it is, to a point. We are also generally living in isolation compared to tribal peoples. Our own homes are our equivalent societies....and even then there are great divides in homes. We spend less time in nature and more time trying to earn money to buy things that we don't need. Advertizing is known to create dissatisfaction - only if we are convinced our lives and ourselves are inadequate will we be tempted into buying what they are selling.

If I believed in God I would beg to join the Amish.
 
elvis the cat

elvis the cat

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Is there something in our environment? Something about the way society works? Depression was never so prevalent centuries ago. Is it the increasing complexity of life that's triggering it?
YOUR QUOTE ABOVE HAS A POINT BUT CENTURIES AGO ANYONE SUFFERING FROM ANY MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEM WAS SEGREGATED FROM SOCIETY AND PUT INTO AN INSTITUTION THIS I KNOW AS I AM PRESENTLY READING THE HISTORY OF A HOSITAL (INSTITUTION ) THAT I WORKED AT . I DON'T THINK THERE IS MORE PREVELANCE OF DEPPRESSION ,JUST THAT SOCIETY IS A LITTLE MORE EXCEPTING THESE DAYS . ALLTHOUGH WE HAVE A LONG WAY TO GO .(y)
 
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bubbling under

bubbling under

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Well I'm depressed because I spent 10yrs of my life being used and basically shit on from a great height, yet couldn't see it, plus I should have been a mum :(
 
dib4uk

dib4uk

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Is there something in our environment? Something about the way society works? Depression was never so prevalent centuries ago. Is it the increasing complexity of life that's triggering it?
In part its social economical thing, and in part its genetic. Like any other illness or ability genetics play a part.

Well centuaries ago people where kept locked up in mental hospitals and secluded from socities. Ms cynical that I am- in that respect has socitey really changed that much, the marginal members are at the same risk. People with server mental health problems face homlessness, debt, suicide and prison. Gosh that could be this day and age.

If you was rich and well suffering from mental health problems most of the time their social groups accepted it. Prime example King George 3rd who was suffering in them days as mad- but science and history puts it down to Porphyria.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3889903.stm

The way I see it is that some of the people I admire most in history had mental health problems, Issac Netwon, Winston Churchill, Einstein had asperges syndrom as well as dysliexia and OCD. The great Charles Darwin was rumored to have obessive compulsive disorder amongts many other things. If these humble and extro-ordinary individuals, some who have helped shape the world around us today had mental health problems, then its ok by me.

When people who are misguided say that i'm lazy and weak, I always remind them that Einstein had problems and so did Churchill.

:D
 
elvis the cat

elvis the cat

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bubbling under im sorry if i offended u with my last post i know the yearning for a child can be awful . i know i'm lucky to have a child but having to have a hysterectomy at 25 made me feel androgionious, void ,& a completely useless human being .:mad:
 
dib4uk

dib4uk

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Bubbling under - for years and years and years i wanted to be a mum- thinking that would take away the emptyiness inside. I have Polycystic ovary syndrome so i cant have children. No one really prepares a person to be told that they cant have kids- the specialists told me when I was 13-14 years old. Since then I've been trying to battle my PCOS and mental health problems and my infertility on my own and silently.

I get that about being androgionous- cause i have facial hair cause of my hormonal imbalaces.

Guess my body said enough to all that last year. Time for a change.
 
bubbling under

bubbling under

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my babies never got a chance to be born and I can't see it ever happening again now:(
 
B

Borderline

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People who are clinically depressed can be depressed for no discernible reason whatsoever. It is a low pervasive mood, a chemical imbalance. You could win a million dollars and have success in relationships but still feel like a used cigarette butt.
 
A

avinash8340

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deppression

People who are clinically depressed can be depressed for no discernible reason whatsoever. It is a low pervasive mood, a chemical imbalance. You could win a million dollars and have success in relationships but still feel like a used cigarette butt.
IF you think you are happy you are happy, even though you dont have onedollar in your pocket.henry ford died unhappy deespite of having billions of dolars.Although chemical imbalance does couse deppression but
we can change that imbalace by regular medicines. Its how you think also matters. Most of religous priests Hindu , christans dont have much. BUT they are quite happy.
 
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Soren

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i agree with grizzlybear to a large extent. i'd add that we in "the west" (a trite phrase, i know) have our priorities completely wrong.

our political and "educated" (read: "trained") elite still think that quality of life is reducible to material wealth (and for them, perhaps, it really is). they pursue it unquestioningly whilst the rest of us are forced to live the consequences.

(e.g. social alienation, a prevailing obsession with work and competition, "status anxiety", high property prices, sickening consumerism, long working/commuting hours, etc. etc.)

all of the above leads to a cold, clinical soulless world where you can't relax, think, or choose your own pace or take your own path. and even when you realize that you do want to get out of it, you realize you can't because everything and everyplace is owned by somebody.

so, if you can't keep up, then its homelessness or suicide (or if you're really lucky, a dirty stinking bedsit for the rest of your life).

its true that things are better in many ways than they ever have been (we're safer, have more rights, are physically healthier), but we've lost something too. creativity, nature, spirituality, meaning, perspective, thought? dunno.
 
dib4uk

dib4uk

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I dont know why we're all depressed, but I would give anything to be happy, healthy and whole as the saying goes.

Sadly I'm neither, and for me depression has been part of my life on and off for as long as I can remember- when I was a teen, as an adult and now.

Having lots of money might just take away some of my problems- well most, i'd not be in debt, I wouldnt have to rely on the social system to support me, and I could recover and then decide to work if I want to.
 
A

Apotheosis

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its true that things are better in many ways than they ever have been (we're safer, have more rights, are physically healthier), but we've lost something too. creativity, nature, spirituality, meaning, perspective, thought? dunno.
I largely agree with your observations.

There are individuals who don't buy into it all; to a greater or lesser degree - but like you say; it's very hard to opt out of it; & those that do/try to; are often severely penalised.

(we're safer, have more rights, are physically healthier)
I would say that a lot is appearances.

I question how long things will carry on largely as they are? How the 'West' is living is unsustainable. Especially when we look at the issues of 'peak oil', certain environmental implications, & the use of resources - then you have to ask some serious questions.

It is no longer the 'mentally ill' who are worried about the end of the world (as we know it). These issues are effecting more & more people. I had a long chat on Sunday with a friend I don't see too often. He is reasonably well off, no MH issues, detached large house, good business, & a family. He has thought about all these issues in a similar way to me; & he said he has been ill to a degree with being so bothered around it all.

The age of cheap/easily accessible Oil is ending; & that in itself is going to cause considerable change. We have enjoyed ''free' energy' for some 120 years; & we won't be for very much longer. This is a situation that the majority of people have totally buried their heads in the sand over - But we can't just magically create more Oil. Virtually nothing is being done to address this issue; & it isn't going to go away.

I don't know the future; but I do consider it a bit - longer term as well. Maybe we get another 200 odd years of something resembling what we have at present? Maybe not. But whether things carry on largely as they are for 5 years or 200 years - I cannot see how it will last? & I do see some very dark clouds building for humanities collective future.

“Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation, and a house divided against a house falls." -Jesus (Luke 11:17)
 
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