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What's the chemistry of a depression nap?

Ricky Bobby

Ricky Bobby

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Joined
Apr 23, 2020
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Europe
Right now I'm going through what's a classical depression episode for me.

I wake up in terror and it passes within a few minutes. I have about a two hour gap where I feel kind of okay and can do stuff. Then I just crash and feel like I can't move a finger. I do my best to stay awake...

I have a nap (if you can call an hour and a half of sleep a nap) and I feel better. I can even work a bit. I read a lot of stuff on naps but no one explains what is the chemistry behind that lift in the afternoons.

My therapist calls it typical for a depression episode but still has no specific explanation about what chemically happens.

My idea is to reverse engineer it if I can and get more out of it. If I fail to find out what happens chemically, I'll think I'll just wake up very early and take that nap at noon so that I can have more of a normal day.

I did that already and it does work.

Anyone has any idea about what that nap does in people who feel better after it?
 
NWiddi

NWiddi

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May 6, 2017
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Sheffiield
Anyone has any idea about what that nap does in people who feel better after it?
I know the neurotransmitter Dopamine is produced more when we're asleep than when we're awake.

Dopamine plays a role in pleasure, motivation, and learning. But too much can lead to problems both mental and physical as can too little.

I experienced psychosis which can mean my Dopamine was way too high so I take drugs that block my Dopamine receptors but there are drugs and supplements and foods that can raise your levels, Banana's are one food that can increase your Dopamine levels as well as your Potassium levels which is good for better motor control.

As with all things that alter your brain chemistry you should only use them under strict supervision from a doctor.

I hope this information aids in your research.
 
Ricky Bobby

Ricky Bobby

New member
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Apr 23, 2020
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Europe
Thanks, I do know about the connection between sleep and dopamine, I just think it's not that simple.

If it were, you'd just feel as good in the mornings, probably even better. According to my therapist, she's seen this daily pattern of feeling better after the "second sleep" but she still fails to explain it.

Something happens in that one extra sleep cycle that helps, for me at least...
 
malika

malika

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Mar 1, 2020
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argentina
hey there! how about complete relaxation and letting go of the nagging conscious mind?

I experience extreme fatigue when I am in depression and often feel it is my own mind that kind of knocks me out as I make myself tired :)
 
Capt Hooke

Capt Hooke

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Mar 12, 2020
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Hadley Rille
Despite the fact that people have been telling us for decades that the basic chemistry underlying depression is understood, I am totally unconvinced that they know much all. I speak as someone with depression for ~40 years and I have a PhD in chemistry.

For years, serotonin was (still is?) the centre of attention, but as far back as the 1990's, one eminent American scientist published a paper in which he suggested, that while it was true that serotonin seemed to be 'involved in everything', that actually, it controls nothing.

Am I right in thinking that the man who first proposed the selective re-uptake inhibition process, and won a Nobel Prize for it, went on to wish he had "done things differently" in promoting that idea?

Then finally, I think it is the case that none of the big 4 pharmaceutical companies have active programmes on new anti-depressants and that clearly suggests that they have finally realised the delusions they have worked on in the past have come undone, though not before they made HUGE profits out of the drugs they put on the market?

Sorry to be so negative, but I've been there, read the book, seen the movie....
 
O

OliviaAustralia

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
48
Location
Australia
Right now I'm going through what's a classical depression episode for me.

I wake up in terror and it passes within a few minutes. I have about a two hour gap where I feel kind of okay and can do stuff. Then I just crash and feel like I can't move a finger. I do my best to stay awake...

I have a nap (if you can call an hour and a half of sleep a nap) and I feel better. I can even work a bit. I read a lot of stuff on naps but no one explains what is the chemistry behind that lift in the afternoons.

My therapist calls it typical for a depression episode but still has no specific explanation about what chemically happens.

My idea is to reverse engineer it if I can and get more out of it. If I fail to find out what happens chemically, I'll think I'll just wake up very early and take that nap at noon so that I can have more of a normal day.

I did that already and it does work.

Anyone has any idea about what that nap does in people who feel better after it?
I've read that the reason babies need to nap so much is that everything they experience or encounter is new and that's overwhelming, so the sleep allows their brain to process it all. Maybe that's relevant for adults too?
 
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