What is Schizoid Personality Disorder and do you have it?

J

Jake L.

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 7, 2015
Messages
65
#1
I have been through a few phases of being interested in personality disorders and going through hours of researching about them.
The one that stands out to me the most is Schizoid Personality Disorder or SPD for short, I personally have a particular interest towards SPD.

First, I want to say that I am in no way a qualified professional or specialist nor am I diagnosed with SPD, although I think that I do share at least a few traits with those who would qualify as being Schizoid, I do not fit the full criteria.

Now with that out of the way, lets begin!
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Schizoid Personality Disorder belongs in the 'Cluster A' category of Personality Disorders. The 'Cluster A' category is the group of personalities that are considered odd and eccentric which includes Paranoid, Schizoid, and Schizotypal.

A good way to explain SPD is thinking of introversion and then imagining a category that is beyond introverted, like you have an extrovert then an introvert and then at the rock bottom you have schizoid, it is the polar opposite of histrionic personality disorder.

Schizoid gets a bad reputation due to its name and can often be confused with Schizotypal or Schizophrenia, although they are different from one another they are also related.
Schizophrenia has symptoms that are categorized into two groups, the positive symptoms are traits added that should not be there (hallucinations, delusions, paranoia etc.), and the negative symptoms are traits removed that should be there (a lack of motivation, lack of emotion, flat affect etc.).

Now interestingly Schizotypal represents someone who suffers from the positive symptoms of Schizophrenia but without the psychosis, however Schizoid represents someone who suffers from the negative symptoms of Schizophrenia but without the psychosis.
If you add both the symptoms of Schizoid and Schizotypal you get Schizophrenia, so that's how they are related to one another.

How do I know that I have SPD?:
Many introverts who ever researched about personality disorders would think at some point that they could have SPD, and sometimes it can be hard to know for sure if you do or not. Apparently people with SPD have the highest rate of diagnosing themselves accurately, however there are a few SPD traits that you need to think about before you know for sure it is worth considering.

Personally I do not think that SPD should be considered a disorder at all since I believe that a lot of them are very happy with the way they are, many schizoids who see psychologists only do so to get people off their back.

I have listed a few things below that Schizoids would relate to, if you can relate to 3 or more of the following then you might possibly be Schizoid!

1. Being very independent and me-focused. What people think or say about me is irrelevant, all that matters is that I am doing something by my own terms and at my own pace.

2. Not many things interest me and I don't want to do much, I do not get excited like other people do.

3. Personal space and solitude is very important to me, I find it very suffocating when my personal space is violated.

4. I have little to no interest in having friends and spending time with my family, I don't get lonely.

5. I am indifferent to many things and it is hard for me to behave appropriately because of this.

6. I am able to put on a face and speak superficially to others but I tend to avoid more personal social interactions whenever possible.

7. I do not have much motivation in life and I don't want the many things like other people do.

8. I have little to no desire for a sexual/romantic relationship, I don't care if I don't have sex for the rest of my life.

9. I have little energy and don't get enthusiastic like other people do.

10. I am indifferent when people around me are angry and/or stressed, I don't care enough to be provoked.

Another thing to consider is your 'Big 5 Personality' profile, many people would assume that any personality with low extraversion could be schizoid but not necessarily so.
Avoidant Personality Disorder has the same level of introversion as Schizoid but has a much higher score for neuroticism, Avoidants are secluded because of their fears and emotions, Schizoids are secluded because they simply don't care.
I'll have some fun and make two personality profiles of Schizoids and Avoidants for us to compare with (this is only backed up by personal bias):

Avoidant
Openness= Any
Conscientiousness= Any
Extraversion= Low
Agreeableness= Average-High
Neuroticism= High

Schizoid
Openness= Low-Average
Conscientiousness= Any
Extraversion= Low
Agreeableness= Low-Average
Neuroticism= Low-Average

Another thing to consider before diagnosing yourself is to think about why you are the way you are, for example if your reasons are because of negative emotions then you might not be Schizoid, especially if you actually want more success in your social life. I'll repeat myself and say that Schizoids simply do not care about being social and feel little need to change.

I hope that anyone who read this has learned more about SPD and more about whether or not they have it.
I have read an article saying that Schizoid Personality Disorder is no longer relevant, but that's probably because Schizoids rarely go out to see psychologists XD
 
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J

Jake L.

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 7, 2015
Messages
65
#3
calypso: Its just a bundle of SPD-related information I have acquired through the years, not really from anything in particular but I will share a few links below.

Schizoid personality disorder - Wikipedia

Schizoid personality disorder - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

The Schizoid Patient - A Case Study | HealthyPlace

Schizoid personality disorder linked to unbearable and inescapable loneliness

I have read an article saying that Schizoid Personality Disorder is no longer relevant,
--> The Disappearance of the Schizoid Personality | Psychology Today UK
 
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F

forumuser23

New member
Joined
Jan 10, 2019
Messages
3
#4
I have been through a few phases of being interested in personality disorders and going through hours of researching about them.
The one that stands out to me the most is Schizoid Personality Disorder or SPD for short, I personally have a particular interest towards SPD.

First, I want to say that I am in no way a qualified professional or specialist nor am I diagnosed with SPD, although I think that I do share at least a few traits with those who would qualify as being Schizoid, I do not fit the full criteria.

Now with that out of the way, lets begin!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Schizoid Personality Disorder belongs in the 'Cluster A' category of Personality Disorders. The 'Cluster A' category is the group of personalities that are considered odd and eccentric which includes Paranoid, Schizoid, and Schizotypal.

A good way to explain SPD is thinking of introversion and then imagining a category that is beyond introverted, like you have an extrovert then an introvert and then at the rock bottom you have schizoid, it is the polar opposite of histrionic personality disorder.

Schizoid gets a bad reputation due to its name and can often be confused with Schizotypal or Schizophrenia, although they are different from one another they are also related.
Schizophrenia has symptoms that are categorized into two groups, the positive symptoms are traits added that should not be there (hallucinations, delusions, paranoia etc.), and the negative symptoms are traits removed that should be there (a lack of motivation, lack of emotion, flat affect etc.).

Now interestingly Schizotypal represents someone who suffers from the positive symptoms of Schizophrenia but without the psychosis, however Schizoid represents someone who suffers from the negative symptoms of Schizophrenia but without the psychosis.
If you add both the symptoms of Schizoid and Schizotypal you get Schizophrenia, so that's how they are related to one another.

How do I know that I have SPD?:
Many introverts who ever researched about personality disorders would think at some point that they could have SPD, and sometimes it can be hard to know for sure if you do or not. Apparently people with SPD have the highest rate of diagnosing themselves accurately, however there are a few SPD traits that you need to think about before you know for sure it is worth considering.

Personally I do not think that SPD should be considered a disorder at all since I believe that a lot of them are very happy with the way they are, many schizoids who see psychologists only do so to get people off their back.

I have listed a few things below that Schizoids would relate to, if you can relate to 3 or more of the following then you might possibly be Schizoid!

1. Being very independent and me-focused. What people think or say about me is irrelevant, all that matters is that I am doing something by my own terms and at my own pace.

2. Not many things interest me and I don't want to do much, I do not get excited like other people do.

3. Personal space and solitude is very important to me, I find it very suffocating when my personal space is violated.

4. I have little to no interest in having friends and spending time with my family, I don't get lonely.

5. I am indifferent to many things and it is hard for me to behave appropriately because of this.

6. I am able to put on a face and speak superficially to others but I tend to avoid more personal social interactions whenever possible.

7. I do not have much motivation in life and I don't want the many things like other people do.

8. I have little to no desire for a sexual/romantic relationship, I don't care if I don't have sex for the rest of my life.

9. I have little energy and don't get enthusiastic like other people do.

10. I am indifferent when people around me are angry and/or stressed, I don't care enough to be provoked.

Another thing to consider is your 'Big 5 Personality' profile, many people would assume that any personality with low extraversion could be schizoid but not necessarily so.
Avoidant Personality Disorder has the same level of introversion as Schizoid but has a much higher score for neuroticism, Avoidants are secluded because of their fears and emotions, Schizoids are secluded because they simply don't care.
I'll have some fun and make two personality profiles of Schizoids and Avoidants for us to compare with (this is only backed up by personal bias):

Avoidant
Openness= Any
Conscientiousness= Any
Extraversion= Low
Agreeableness= Average-High
Neuroticism= High

Schizoid
Openness= Low-Average
Conscientiousness= Any
Extraversion= Low
Agreeableness= Low-Average
Neuroticism= Low-Average

Another thing to consider before diagnosing yourself is to think about why you are the way you are, for example if your reasons are because of negative emotions then you might not be Schizoid, especially if you actually want more success in your social life. I'll repeat myself and say that Schizoids simply do not care about being social and feel little need to change.

I hope that anyone who read this has learned more about SPD and more about whether or not they have it.
I have read an article saying that Schizoid Personality Disorder is no longer relevant, but that's probably because Schizoids rarely go out to see psychologists XD
well yeh, the reason why schizoid PD has such a high self diagnose rate is because the very disorder is NOT a disorder to begin with in many respects. second, here's an ironic but not surprising point, the psychoanalyst salman akhtar had mentioned that he believed schizoid PD was actually one of the more common PDs, if you take this into account and combine it with what it is today, his point actually is further proved as accurate, because really schizoid PD is just a group of people who are not impaired but then are supposed to think they are because the stupid DSM gave them a label. btw, i will be going on a bit tangent here but hopefully it helps anyone of interest.

nothing new here. also what you mention with the conditions being additive is simply not true. as someone diagnosed with schizotypal PD and severe depression, i can assure you, i am nothing like people with schizoid PD and schizophrenia, based off my real life experience with them in person AND online in forums and looking at many videos and illustrations, i was not like them at all and envied them and was disgusted by them and felt very inferior towards them, although i feel inferior to most people anyways.

i have gathered enough actual realistic info to make these qualitative distinctions and they are not from mere random opinions but rather putting myself out there and interacting with others on a literal level. "schizoids" as many call themselves are basically the type of people like albert einstein, stephen hawking, etc. they are not qualitatively disordered or impaired individuals, they are different, but their difference isn't for the worse in the sense of being inferior or living a bad life.

avoidant's on the other hand are very lucid, it's like the only thing wrong with them is some delusional thing spiraling their heads on the same thing but every single thing else in their life and existence is functional, they usually do well academically, usually can work and stay working and / or can get into university, etc.

contrast to people with schizotypal PD, they are very much NOT lucid, tend to have poorer education and / or socioeconomic status, less likely to be employed, and even if they do, it's usually short lived and poor and limited. they basically have traits from almost every disorder, but i'll repeat, that doesn't make them like people with other disorders. don't confuse what i say.

schizotypal PD is more likely to get misdiagnosed with many things because psychologists or people will pick up one trait from them that may be present in another disorder because schizotypal people are / or should be diverse, at least consider myself. i still do not relate much to the other schizotypal pd people i've met online, i've never met anyone in person who had it, and even if they did without specifically mentioning, i didn't relate to them.

as far as the big 5 goes, most viewpoints on it are inaccurate, because people are trying to use that "intuitive" way of understanding hypothetically what these disorders would be like when in reality, it's actually not that way at all and quite different.

for example, one incorrect observation is that people with schizotypal pd score high on openness to experience. if you look at this logically and understand actual PD fundamentals, this is completely false, lacking spontaneous ability in all sense combined with social isolation, solitute, solitary activities and / or low ability for meaningful and consistent interactions would automatically make you lower on openness to experience, and that's not factoring in personal issues, aspects and ways of functioning.

also the big 5 doesn't factor a lot of things like being reasonable which is NOT the same as being agreeable, but because this is often a covert feature, most lay people or typical people / normal people would not notice this and then just trivialize one person as being similar to another when in fact they arent, for example, schizotypal person vs an avoidant, both may appear warm and friendly on the outside but for different mechanisms and reasons or ways. the schizotypal does so as a instinctive mechanism that is already part of their personality but which they also put into place through necessity to achieve a level of reasonable communication and functioning, but often this ends up being a double edged sword because of individual differences with other people.

so they end up maybe agreeing with another person when they shouldn't have, or maybe the communication may end with the other person taking advantage of the schizotypal and creating sort of a guilt trip, this happened to me a lot in the past, specifically where i wouldn't be agreeing with the way another person was observing something or trying to give me assistance but i couldn't seem to get this person to think or assist me any differently, and at some point, i'll be like, well, this is complicated, making it seem like i am complicating the matters when it really is the other person not being genuine / straightforward, and i end up being told i am "complicating things".

but this is how most people are like, it kind of has to do with being cliche, something that schizotypal PD are not like, however, do not confuse this metaphors or sayings.

honestly, if you wanted my opinion, i'd say schizoids and avoidants are more closer to each other than they are to schizotypal PD individually, although my explanation is somewhat farfetched as it carries on it a measure of different sequences.

also narcissism plays an aspect in all this too. there was a argument on whether schizoid PD is the same or similar to narcissistic PD and the simple answer to this is NO!! however...., now this requires redefining narcissistic PD, as people know, there are mainly two terms / types used for narcissism, either the grandiose type which reflects mostly what the DSM criteria or the covert type or vulnerable narcissism which is only a side researched phenomenon, and carries all sort of theories and explanations.

interestingly, overt / grandiose narcissistics do not have these outer rage / aggressive outbursts that the covert / vulnerable types have, suggesting a qualitative difference in not only functioning but personality, considering these are reactive and by definition, they aren't actually externalizing behaviors but are the very basis of psychological / neurological / biological disturbances combined with interpersonal problems, creates a huge problem.

here's why, what we call covert and overt in narcissism is simply wrong, because the two should be different labelled conditions. i don't think the current name "narcissistic personality disorder" is wrong, it's fine as it is, however, i believe the covert aspect should be distinctively attributed as part of a completely different condition and pathology. now the thing is, a lot of the sources on covert narcissism are a bit messy, most sources create a pathology that is just a pseudo version of the overt narcissism and doesn't suggest really anything pathologically or qualitatively different, these should be kept with the original NPD definition, however, other aspects like easily angered / distressed and high neuroticism are clearly different.

the real other condition should be labelled as vulnerable personality disorder because that's exactly what it's like, pretty much the opposite of schizoid PD, what is the schizoid PD vulnerable to anymore than the average person, not much..., and avoidants, well, i already explained them lol. the person with VPD as mentioned above is basically someone who is more diverse in functioning and feelings, for example, easily angered or distressed when interacting and functioning with people, something that i rarely experienced in person, considering how many people there are in this world, i am surprised it's been like this in my experience. specifically vulnerability to life's stresses and trauma.

but that's just how it's been like in my experience with people from anywhere, whether it was online, in forums, youtube videos, in person, there was not much variance. it's also ironic but not suprising to me that in the video on youtube with andrew talking about personality disorders, how he mentions therapists will jump to the conclusion of their patient with a diagnosis of PD because of just observing how they "Act" rather than actually go more in depth and trying to understand the person as a whole / their motivations, etc.

quite frankly, this happens a lot, cough cough...."schizoid PD".
 
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J

Jake L.

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 7, 2015
Messages
65
#5
Disclaimer:
Just gonna be clear and say that I am aware that SPD is a label for certain behaviours that some people show, and that the methods of psychologists/therapists are questionable, and that SPD traits could just simply be part of a spectrum of normal behaviour.
I made this thread for fun because this is something that I am interested in and I have a weakness for common traits being classified as disorders, categorizing and labelling things is a personal guilty pleasure.

Like I said earlier, I am in no way a qualified professional and did not strive to make an accurate or professional post about a disorder that may or may not exist. So any reader can take what I say with a grain of salt.
 
E

eccentric Jon

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
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Location
Scotland
#6
we'll that was an interesting read, I particularly liked the bit about spd not being an actual disorder because I think a lot of these labels that are forced on us by so called experts, actually make us worse because we dwell on our labels and use these labels as an excuse for our behaviour, ie I'm sorry for being a **** but I can't help it I have bpd or spd or depression etc.