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What is BPD? A brief explanation:

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Boudicca

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Jun 1, 2020
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400
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London
I have BPD and when I was initially diagnosed I was prescribed Quetiapine! I’ve heard that this drug does nothing for BPD. Why did the psychiatrist put me on this drug, if this drug is not really for BPD? Could anyone tell me. I’m not on quetiapine any more because I became pre diabetic on it. So I’m quite angry about the whole ordeal. Thank you in advance.
 
daffy

daffy

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Dec 16, 2007
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hiding behind the sofa
Hi I’m new so not sure who i can ask, but is it ok to reply here if a mental health “professional” falsely labelled me with EUPD?
Hi and welcome to the forum
I would suggest that you start your own thread In the BPD section and put in the reasons why you think your wrongly diagnose. I think you’ll get more replies that way
 
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poppy_gray

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Joined
Aug 6, 2020
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1
Location
Chicago
Borderline Personality Disorder is one of ten personality disorders recognised by the DSM IV.

A personality disorder is a type of mental illness and to be diagnosed particular criteria must be met. With personality disorders, the symptoms have usually been present for a long time. These symptoms have an overall negative affect on the sufferer’s life.

One of the core signs and symptoms in BPD is the proneness to impulsive behaviour. This impulsiveness can manifest itself in negative ways. For example, self-harm is common among individuals with BPD and in many instances, this is an impulsive act. Sufferers of BPD can also be prone to angry outbursts and possibly criminal offences (mainly in male sufferers) as a result of impulsive urges.

Another common feature of BPD is affective lability. This means that sufferers have trouble stabilising moods and as a result, mood changes can become erratic. Other characteristics of this condition include reality distortion, tendency to see things in ‘black and white’ terms, excessive behaviour such as gambling or sexual promiscuity, and proneness to depression.
(To learn more about symptoms and diagnostic criteria please go to the section on diagnostic criteria.)

These traits can sometimes make it very difficult for a person to maintain a relationship with someone with BPD as their behaviour and actions can be difficult to tolerate and hard to understand. It is important for persons close to a BPD sufferer to educate themselves on the condition so they can empathise with what the sufferer is going through and how they are feeling.

BPD is not usually diagnosed before adolescence. It has been suggested that BPD symptoms can sometimes improve as time goes on or even disappear all together. This is not always the case however as BPD can continue to affect sufferers well into later life.

Traits from other mental illnesses and psychological conditions from the DSM IV can often co-exist in BPD patients. These are usually anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression)


Further information can be found at:

Welcome to BPDWORLD
thanks for the useful info:) I’ve been in therapy for some time and have been formally diagnosed with OCD, but relate so much to BPD. I don’t want to diagnose myself, but I’m unsure as to how to approach this topic with my therapist. For reference, I experience extreme mood swings that interfere with relationships, an intense fear of abandonment, self harm, and black/white thinking. Much of which feels debilitating. I’ve taken online quizzes (all of which suggest a high probability of BPD) but want a formal diagnosis-any suggestions on how to approach the topic with my therapist?
 
GhostOfLenin

GhostOfLenin

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 16, 2020
Messages
2,550
Location
Glasgow
Borderline Personality Disorder is one of ten personality disorders recognised by the DSM IV.

A personality disorder is a type of mental illness and to be diagnosed particular criteria must be met. With personality disorders, the symptoms have usually been present for a long time. These symptoms have an overall negative affect on the sufferer’s life.

One of the core signs and symptoms in BPD is the proneness to impulsive behaviour. This impulsiveness can manifest itself in negative ways. For example, self-harm is common among individuals with BPD and in many instances, this is an impulsive act. Sufferers of BPD can also be prone to angry outbursts and possibly criminal offences (mainly in male sufferers) as a result of impulsive urges.

Another common feature of BPD is affective lability. This means that sufferers have trouble stabilising moods and as a result, mood changes can become erratic. Other characteristics of this condition include reality distortion, tendency to see things in ‘black and white’ terms, excessive behaviour such as gambling or sexual promiscuity, and proneness to depression.
(To learn more about symptoms and diagnostic criteria please go to the section on diagnostic criteria.)

These traits can sometimes make it very difficult for a person to maintain a relationship with someone with BPD as their behaviour and actions can be difficult to tolerate and hard to understand. It is important for persons close to a BPD sufferer to educate themselves on the condition so they can empathise with what the sufferer is going through and how they are feeling.

BPD is not usually diagnosed before adolescence. It has been suggested that BPD symptoms can sometimes improve as time goes on or even disappear all together. This is not always the case however as BPD can continue to affect sufferers well into later life.

Traits from other mental illnesses and psychological conditions from the DSM IV can often co-exist in BPD patients. These are usually anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression)


Further information can be found at:

Welcome to BPDWORLD
Good description. My ex was BPD and that described most of her traits
 
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