What is BPD? A brief explanation:

amathus

amathus

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#1
Borderline Personality Disorder is one of ten personality disorders recognised by the DSM IV.

A personality disorder is a type of mental illness and to be diagnosed particular criteria must be met. With personality disorders, the symptoms have usually been present for a long time. These symptoms have an overall negative affect on the sufferer’s life.

One of the core signs and symptoms in BPD is the proneness to impulsive behaviour. This impulsiveness can manifest itself in negative ways. For example, self-harm is common among individuals with BPD and in many instances, this is an impulsive act. Sufferers of BPD can also be prone to angry outbursts and possibly criminal offences (mainly in male sufferers) as a result of impulsive urges.

Another common feature of BPD is affective lability. This means that sufferers have trouble stabilising moods and as a result, mood changes can become erratic. Other characteristics of this condition include reality distortion, tendency to see things in ‘black and white’ terms, excessive behaviour such as gambling or sexual promiscuity, and proneness to depression.
(To learn more about symptoms and diagnostic criteria please go to the section on diagnostic criteria.)

These traits can sometimes make it very difficult for a person to maintain a relationship with someone with BPD as their behaviour and actions can be difficult to tolerate and hard to understand. It is important for persons close to a BPD sufferer to educate themselves on the condition so they can empathise with what the sufferer is going through and how they are feeling.

BPD is not usually diagnosed before adolescence. It has been suggested that BPD symptoms can sometimes improve as time goes on or even disappear all together. This is not always the case however as BPD can continue to affect sufferers well into later life.

Traits from other mental illnesses and psychological conditions from the DSM IV can often co-exist in BPD patients. These are usually anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression)


Further information can be found at:

http://www.bpdworld.org
 
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Fairy Lucretia

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#2
I found this very useful
thanks
x
I was wondering if anyone knew if aspergers was considered a personality disorder
I am being tested for aspergers but my cpn and pdoc were talking about BPD.
I wish they would make up their minds after 15 plus years exactly what is wrong with me
xx
 
speckles

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#3
aspergers is not a PD, it is completely separate to bpd - although you could have both disorders of course. Aspergers is a disorder on the autism spectrum. I don't know that diagnosis always helps that much as often they are wrong or not straight forward sends people off the wrong garden path in terms of treatment, sometimes when it is hard to be sure about dx i think it is better just to treat the different symptoms that are causing the difficulties in the most appropriate way.
 
Dita85

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#4
Hi Lucretia.

Aspergers is not a personality disorder, it is an autistic spectrum disorder. Autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a neurological basis. You are born with an ASD. Personality Disorders are considered to have some genetic basis, so you are born with the potential to develop a Personality Disorder, but the symptoms only emerge as you grow up. You cannot be diagnosed with a PD before the age of 18, whereas you can be diagnosed with an ASD from the age of four.

The two conditions are quite different. I have a friend who has Aspergers and I have BPD traits (not a formal BPD diagnosis). Sometimes professionals struggle to diagnose Aspergers in women because it can present differently to the way it does in men. There is some information here about how women can experience Aspergers. help4aspergers.com - Home

Obviously, it is very important that you get the correct diagnosis because the things that people with Aspergers and BPD need support with can be quite different.
 
Fairy Lucretia

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#5
thank you so much both of you
xx
I was diagnosed with recurrent depression many many years ago and ocd I take a mood stabilizer ,antipschotic and anti depressant.
reading on the internet about BPD and aspergers ,I guess I could be either with some of the symptoms I have.
hopefully they will make their minds up soon/cpn and pdoc and I will get the right treatment
xx
I also have social anxiety and am extremely unstable emotionally and have separation anxiety and cannot be away from my mum ,am not really grown up emotionally either ,so I don't know which I am.
maybe they don't know either!
anyway ,sorry for taking over this thread ,I shall say no more now
xx
 
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sallybee

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#6
For what it is worth Aspergers is not a MH problem / diagnosis. Aspergers as mentioned above is a form of Autism previously known as 'Pervasive developmental delay'. It is a recognised learning difficulty, although it is frequently not accompanied by LD's per se, but a difficulty to learn and understand social interaction through normal methods.

Because of the difficulties that many people with Aspergers have in areas such as communication, socialisation, and organisation, many will also experience significant levels of anxiety and other mental illnesses but where strategies can be put into place to enable the person to manage their environment and anxieties, they will oftem manage to live a fulfilling ad independent lifestyle.

Lu one other useless piece of information, as a % greater numbers of people with an Aspergers diagnosis are within the top 2% of the population in relation to intelligence than within the normal population. That basically means that you are more likely to be a genius if you have Aspergers than if you haven't!
 
Fairy Lucretia

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#7
I think it is not considered an illness ,but a disability-that has a tendancie to cause mental illness such as anxiety ,depression and ocd
but I think I remember reading BPD is not an illness as such either
xx
 
Dita85

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#8
You're not hijacking the thread, but you are welcome to PM me if you would rather.

Personality Disorder is not considered quite the same as a mental illness like depression. Aspergers does often go with depression and anxiety, and some of the routines and 'rules' associated with Aspergers is very OCD like.

I'm sorry it has taken so long for the professionals to figure out what is going on, unfortunately both BPD and Aspergers can be missed. Let us know how you get on. Whatever you are eventually diagnosed with, you will always be welcome here :)
 
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Kwasiandkovu

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#9
I was diagnosed in 2002 with BPD and this was poo pooed by my GP however I have been on various levels of Sertraline since 50mg to 200mg. I am going to see if I can have a proper diagnosis of my '\condition' as I don't think the way I function is right . I get fixated on things such as past episodes or an argument with someone and this is slowly destroying my life.

I was in the past promiscuous and have had a huge drink problem and now largly stay away from drink as this has ruined my life.

Do you know if obsessing over things is part of BPD?





Borderline Personality Disorder is one of ten personality disorders recognised by the DSM IV.

A personality disorder is a type of mental illness and to be diagnosed particular criteria must be met. With personality disorders, the symptoms have usually been present for a long time. These symptoms have an overall negative affect on the sufferer’s life.

One of the core signs and symptoms in BPD is the proneness to impulsive behaviour. This impulsiveness can manifest itself in negative ways. For example, self-harm is common among individuals with BPD and in many instances, this is an impulsive act. Sufferers of BPD can also be prone to angry outbursts and possibly criminal offences (mainly in male sufferers) as a result of impulsive urges.

Another common feature of BPD is affective lability. This means that sufferers have trouble stabilising moods and as a result, mood changes can become erratic. Other characteristics of this condition include reality distortion, tendency to see things in ‘black and white’ terms, excessive behaviour such as gambling or sexual promiscuity, and proneness to depression.
(To learn more about symptoms and diagnostic criteria please go to the section on diagnostic criteria.)

These traits can sometimes make it very difficult for a person to maintain a relationship with someone with BPD as their behaviour and actions can be difficult to tolerate and hard to understand. It is important for persons close to a BPD sufferer to educate themselves on the condition so they can empathise with what the sufferer is going through and how they are feeling.

BPD is not usually diagnosed before adolescence. It has been suggested that BPD symptoms can sometimes improve as time goes on or even disappear all together. This is not always the case however as BPD can continue to affect sufferers well into later life.

Traits from other mental illnesses and psychological conditions from the DSM IV can often co-exist in BPD patients. These are usually anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression)


Further information can be found at:

BPDWORLD - Support and Information
 
DistressedPrincess

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#10
I was diagnosed in 2002 with BPD and this was poo pooed by my GP however I have been on various levels of Sertraline since 50mg to 200mg. I am going to see if I can have a proper diagnosis of my '\condition' as I don't think the way I function is right . I get fixated on things such as past episodes or an argument with someone and this is slowly destroying my life.

I was in the past promiscuous and have had a huge drink problem and now largly stay away from drink as this has ruined my life.

Do you know if obsessing over things is part of BPD?
HI! i too have bpd and yes, i would absolutely say from my experience that i too 'obsess' at times over things. Such as, i am unsure why, but i tend to jump back about 3-4 years whenever i have mine get really bad, maybe this is a safe place? when i do, i start to obsess over things i did back then too.

I can also say that the 'impulsiveness' tend to lead me to obsessing too? Eg, i am a crafty person, i make things. My bpd leads me to opbsessively making something, to the point it is my ONLY focus, and i will dedicate every second to it, and i LOVE it, then the next day, bored, never to do again. Onto something else.

I guess what i am trying to say, is that if you find yourself being impulsive, or obsessing over something, and you find it is something you cant control, find a way to turn it into a positive. Eg, i decided to start an online store. I get to sell things, make money, dont have things lying around the house because i have given up, i just finish them, and sell them. The more impulsive, the more i thank my bpd, i will have more products.

Maybe these things "past episodes or an argument with someone" are a sign that something positive can come out of them? What is it about the past episodes that seem to loop? Is there a certain person, an animal, your favorite jumper? Something that is familiar with all of these loops? Maybe find what that is and use it as something to remind you of the happy part of it.

I hope this wasnt too confusing haha
xx
 
halfway_there

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#11
Yup, that's me alright. I hope I can make things change, especially in regard to relationships with people. I just don't do people well at all. Which makes it hard to hold down jobs. Anyway, thank you.
 
M

modafinilguy

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#12
My opinions:

ADHD occurs frequently in people with BPD.

ADHD is the only childhood mental disorder known to be associated with a higher chance of developing adult ADHD.

My perspective is the disorder is a combination of the following individually or both together: (1) Chronic Childhood trauma/stress/instability (2) Complex neurological problems.

My suspicion is there may be subtypes (and some people may be more than one of these): Chronic Childhood (or early life) Trauma/Stress subtype, ADHD subtype, Bipolar Subtype. This is my theory of course, but there seems to be significant overlap with those factors.

Edit: I directly know 5 people diagnosed earlier in life with ADHD, later when they became extremely emotionally out of control the ADHD was forgotten and they were diagnosed BPD. Not one of these "dual diagnosis" people is coping at all well in life, despite about half of them receiving psychiatric supervision.
 
Q

q4kyhh

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#13
Do I have bpd? When i look it up i have all of the symptoms except for the one where you cant tell whats real and sometimes hear voices. Is that symptom necessary to be diagnosed? Can anyone help me find out whats wrong with me?
 
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kevmc871989

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#14
after years of trying to get help from the mental health proffesion stilll no diagnosis was even once told to self diagnos every one outside the medical proffesion has said i have problems that a doctor needs to deal with reading this and now i really think i have a idea of my problems i thought you were explaining my symptoms.
 
M

MsContradictoryMystery

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#15
If the Doctors are tossing up between various differing diagnosis it might be an indication to see a different Doctor:)
 
M

MsContradictoryMystery

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#16
Looking up symptoms on the internet is a bit dangerous as you can easily over/mis diagnose although it can be helpful in giving you clues on whether you might have a specific mental health issue that might need to be looked in to further with a professional , as for hearing voices etc , I think that only occurs in extreme cases, so no it's not a "necessary" symptom. I have known many people with bpd who haven't experienced that. I think it's around a minimum of 5 symptoms needed for a diagnosis though but I can't be sure I remember that part right.
 
M

MsContradictoryMystery

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#17
It does. Interpersonal skills - dealing with people is meant to be one of the biggest(and most common) challenges for people with bpd which is why DBT (specialized therapy used for bpd sufferers) focuses a lot on learning to develop better social skills/ interpersonal skills. I would try not to be so hard on yourself, people with bpd have usually had a lot of trauma and find it difficult to trust so it makes sense that bonding with others proves scary and difficult but through learning etc this can get easier/better.
 
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mdm4mazing

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#18
i found this very useful to show to a friend who i choose to help after my diagnosis as i simple couldn't put it in to words well enough to describe the disorder to someone who does not have it. thank you xxx
 
C

cfb107

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#19
My opinions:

ADHD occurs frequently in people with BPD.

ADHD is the only childhood mental disorder known to be associated with a higher chance of developing adult ADHD.

My perspective is the disorder is a combination of the following individually or both together: (1) Chronic Childhood trauma/stress/instability (2) Complex neurological problems.

My suspicion is there may be subtypes (and some people may be more than one of these): Chronic Childhood (or early life) Trauma/Stress subtype, ADHD subtype, Bipolar Subtype. This is my theory of course, but there seems to be significant overlap with those factors.

Edit: I directly know 5 people diagnosed earlier in life with ADHD, later when they became extremely emotionally out of control the ADHD was forgotten and they were diagnosed BPD. Not one of these "dual diagnosis" people is coping at all well in life, despite about half of them receiving psychiatric supervision.
There is thought to be a link between ADHD, trauma in early infancy, and BPD (at least by the author Oliver James). See pp.202-204 in 'They F*** You Up'.
 
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girard

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#20
I like your quote.I am reading a couple of books about BPD ,They have already helped me so much.The more you know the better it is.I am putting into practice what I have learned,it was a revelation.I couldnt understand what was going on in my sons head ,I didnt know if I was doing or saying the right thing,I could see his frustration, I could feel his pain,but I felt completely bewildered.I always knew, felt, I was part of the problem but I couldnt see how.Everything has now taken a turn for the better,I know I will make loads of mistakes,but thats ok, we will get over it.I bought my son a book about living with BPD,(I know it will help him,) he had lost hope.Things have changed a lot and so quickly,and I am only half way through my book, it does my head in,its a lot to get your head around ,I know I will have to read it more than once.
 

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