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What do I say to my GP??

S

SoLost

New member
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
Messages
4
Location
Scotland
i'm 20 years old and have been self harming for 6 or 7 years now, i was recently on the self harm forum venting all my frustration and someone replied saying that it sounds like i am quite depressed, i had never considered this before, i looked up some of the symptoms of depression and it seems to be a good fit to the way i feel. im tired all the time and just feel like every day is a struggle to get through, i have aches and pains all over and find it seriously difficult to get out of bed in the morning. someone had also said on the self harm forum that i should go see my GP which i realise is the right thing to do but i just dont know what i would say to him!! i dont want to feel like this anymore and have been trying to work up the courage to go see my GP since one of my friends discovered my self harming. i want to stop but i just dont know how to aproach the subject with my GP. i know he wouldnt judge me but self harming is a really personal thing and i dont know that i could give one specific reason for why i self harm and i know he would ask me. also with the depression, i dont want him telling me to try changing my diet or get more exercise because since i researched depression i have done both of these and it has made little or no difference to how i am feeling.

So i was wondering if anyone had some advise on what to say to my GP and was also wondering if anyone knew what my GP would do for me if i did manage to tell him how i was feeling.

Any help would be much appreciated. :)
 
KP1

KP1

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2008
Messages
1,500
self harm is very complex and I don't think a GP would expect you to be able to give one reason for doing it.
Its possible that you could be offered anti depressants and/or some form of counselling.
Take care.
KP
 
iffybob

iffybob

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 20, 2009
Messages
4,858
Location
England
Hi

Be honest.

You will not be the first person to walk into a GP surgery and tell them that, you GP should be understanding.

Explain to him/her 'exactly' what you have been doing, that you dont understand why, and take it from there.

If it helps print off some of your posts and take them with you.
Or write it down.

It is unlikely that you will get better on you own if this has been going on for years.

You can explain some of the things you have done to try and help yourself.

Take care ..... boB........:)
 
S

SoLost

New member
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
Messages
4
Location
Scotland
i think i will try writing it down because i really dont think i will be able to say it all. i am worried about being given Anti-depressants because i have heard they can be very addictive and i dont want the treatment to cause me anymore problems.

does anyone have any info on anti-depressants??

thanks for the replys, its nice to be able to ask people about these problems! X:)
 
rollinat

rollinat

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2008
Messages
1,816
That sounds like a good plan - it helps you remember what you wanted to say when you only have a short amount of time to say it in.

Although your GP may suggest anti-depressants, you can decide if you want to take them or not. Perhaps they will suggest you come back in a month and see if things have got better in that time. I know it is a scary option to start taking anti-depressants but they can help some people - but it can take a while to show any benefits or to find the right anti-depressant for you. Anti-depressants aren't addictive in the sense that you don't need to take more of them to have the same effect but when it's time to come off them, it is best to do so gradually - so it's not an easy decision to take. Fluoxetine (prozac) and citalopram seem to be the ones that are most often prescribed first. I have never found them to be "happy pills" but they can help to boost your mood enough that you can start making some changes in your life. Counselling is also a good option - a lot of GP surgeries have a counsellor and as there is normally a waiting list it might be an idea to get your name on it - you may decide not to take the appointments when they come up but at least you will have that choice.

Hope that helps, ask away if you have any questions :)
 
K

Kate31

Active member
Joined
Nov 27, 2009
Messages
40
GP

Hi,
best thing is go prepared with what you want to say so you won't forget anything...
they'll have heard everything many times before - just be honest and ask for other options/avenues/more info if you're unsure.
good luck!
 
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