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what are the chances, Schizophrenia?

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deep true blue

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Apr 20, 2011
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11
Location
england
hello,
sorry to post here this wasn't why i joined but i thought i would ask why i was here.
I thought it would be better to ask people who had schizophrenia rather then people who didn't.
its ok if you cant answer i wont worry about it.

What are the chances of a child or grandchild getting Schizophrenia
if both parents have Schizophrenia?
I heard that 1 in 100 of the population get it (I don't know if this is true)
and the chances go up if you have both parents with Schizophrenia.

I heard there is a even higher risk that the grandchild will have it.
I'm worried that if i have a child that i would pass it on?

both my parents suffer from Schizophrenia and other mental health problems.

I hope i made the question clear, I'm not completely educated with this i only no what they go through.
any answers would be appreciated.
thank you.
 
calypso

calypso

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Hiya and :welcome:

I am replying although I don't have schizophrenia, but bipolar. I imagine its the same for both disorders. There is an increased susceptibility in families. But how much that is actually genetics or how much nurture is not clear. My mum was bipolar and it definitely is a strand throughout my family on my mum's side. That said the number who never got it far out weigh those who did. I have two brothers who are perfectly OK, and their children. I have two children who are grown up and are fine. Remember, its not just your genes that are passed on, it is your partner's too. So if there is a biological link it gets watered down through the generations. Don't forget the majority who get a major mental illness have no genetic link or nurture link.

So I would say, stop worrying - did you get schizophrenia from your parents? I hope this has been of some helpxx
 
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deep true blue

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Apr 20, 2011
Messages
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england
hello, :)

thank you for your reply.
I have a mother and a father who both have schizophrenia i don't have schizophrenia from them I'm still young 18 but I'm not sure what age you normally are when you have it.
I heard that the child may not get it but could be a carrier and pass it to there child, whether thats true i don't no.
I want to know my risk or any children i have in the future.
I know its not the end of the world but if i did pass it to a child i would want to know the risks before.
It is also good to know about schizophrenia to be able to understand my parents abit more, there on a load of medication and i know it is hard for them.

thank you it was helpful. :)
 
Star-28

Star-28

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i used to know the exact statistics.. but im not sure. im sure Apo knows them :) (my friend im putting u up to a task he he.. luv ya Apo!!) anyway. my mom is nuts and so am i but i am going to have children no matter what. what better person to take care of someone with a mental illness other than yourself when you have experienced it first hand?? environmental issues have ALOT to do with mental disorders. some illnesses can remain dormant forever unless they are triggered by something stressful.

i seem like a perfectly fine individual most of the time. yeah i hallucinate yada yada but im so used to it i just ignore it most of the time.. anyway not many people know i have a mental illness unless i get under large amounts of constant stress. i will then start having noticable symptoms etc.. dont let mental illness scare u away from having a child. it used to scare me, but i know tons of resources and ways to help because not only do i use the resources myself, but that is what i studied in college and got my degree in. so i deal alot with these type situations... but u know this is all my opinion of course..

take it with a grain of salt so to speak, but i do hope your parents stay well and healthy and that says alot about your good character being able to deal with mental illness from both of your parents. my mom takes a toll on me big time sometimes.. along with my step sister and my cousin... i worry about them all but i can only help someone who wants it and realizes they need it. the rest.... i have no control over..

good luck. welcome to the forum
 
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deep true blue

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Apr 20, 2011
Messages
11
Location
england
hello, thanks for your message Star-28.

Your message did help, it wont put me of having a child, one day hopefully.
Made me realize i shouldn't worry to much.
Its not that i don't wont to have a child with metal illness i just don't want to make a child suffer anything but maybe I'm looking to much into it.
My brother and sister or ok and healthy but they only share the same mum as me i'm my dads only child.

Thanks, i hope my parents do to they will, i just worry about them alot as there mental health is really affecting there physical health and my dad became really ill because of it.
Being the youngest with no proper life (because of my self :) ) and the only one living at home makes it harder because i hate doing the wrong thing making them feel worse.

Anyway thank you, very helpful. :)
 
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deep true blue

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
11
Location
england
I also just thought that if you get Schizophrenia from taking drugs then it wont pass on but if its inherited then you have more of a chance. don't know if thats true but it sounds it.
my dad got Schizophrenia because of the drugs he took not sure about my mum but that makes me think that i wont pass Schizophrenia on or get it myself.
 
R

Roger Waldram

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Nov 1, 2008
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33540 Caumont, Gironde, FRANCE
Hi deep true blue,
Here's a copy of a section of the Appendices of my Doctoral Thesis. I think you'll find it reassuring.

"In January 2004 I attended a workshop in Coventry, ‘From Galton to the Human
Genome Project, a critical appraisal of genetic theories in psychology and psychiatry’.
Speakers included Mary Boyle, professor of clinical psychology who wrote
‘Schizophrenia: a scientific delusion?’ (2002), Jay Joseph, clinical psychologist from
America, author of ‘The Gene Illusion’ (2004), and Richard Bentall, author of
‘Madness Explained (2003).

Jay Joseph used phrases such as ‘pseudoscience’ and suggested many of the studies
used to justify a genetic factor in twins and adoption research concerning
schizophrenia constitute fraud (Joseph, 2004)! A fundamental error in this research
is it is based on an ‘equivalent environment assumption’ (ibid). In fact their
environment was different, and it is perhaps impossible to create such an
environment (ibid). On several Internet sites the genetic basis of schizophrenia is
stated as fact. For example on Schizophrenia.com (2004), ‘It appears likely that
multiple genes are involved in creating a predisposition to develop the disorder.’
Given my own diagnosis at 20 of ‘acute schizophrenia,’ I read on the same site, with
scepticism, cynicism and anger ‘Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling
brain disease’ (ibid). I decided to question the epistemology of the literature and my
own beliefs.

Professor Boyle (2004) said lack of critical thought impacts research priorities, so
there was sparse literature on prevention, since if mental illness is genetic the tenor
is hopelessness (ibid). Also, adoption studies with twins showed no link with later
schizophrenia. In fact, the strongest predictors are the functioning of the adoptive
families and the mental health of adoptive mothers. Despite this, the conclusions
drawn are exactly the opposite, and psychology students are not made aware of the
critical research (ibid). This was in accord with Joseph’s presentation and the
American schizophrenia site mentioned earlier. She suggested new research is more
attractive to journals and credibility goes to prestigious researchers whose
conclusions are sometimes ill-founded and fraudulent. In the United States
psychiatry and psychology relied on schizophrenia as a brain disease since, if so, or
it’s genetic, it removes blame or responsibility from mothers and families (ibid). She
also suggested that today we have ‘genetic possession’ similar to ancient ideas of
possession by deities or spirits when the conclusion then and now is that nothing
can be done. Her conclusions were; schizophrenia needs a fundamental
reclassification, and requires new research that focuses on phenomenology,
continuity with normal experience and the meaning and function of these
experiences. She also said when we try to understand experiences then people are
changed by that process of understanding (ibid). Her conclusions influenced the
research methodology, and I decided participant voices should be heard through
heuristic enquiry into the phenomenology of their experience.

Professor Richard Bentall suggested that the environment of psychosis was a case of
neglect and taboo (2004). He said environment always strongly influences
psychological development. He discussed environmental factors such as the lack of
early attachment (perhaps mother and baby not bonding, or enforced separation),
the impact of abuse, unwanted pregnancies, and communication deviance in parents
leading to thought disorders in children. He suggested there were three major biases
at work in the study of mental illness: 1.Misunderstandings, e.g. concerning genetics
and brain abnormality. 2. The idea that psychoses are medical diseases, sustained
by Big Pharma (i.e. the big pharmaceutical companies), the medical profession and
some patient-relative groups who wish to avoid any personal responsibility and deny
parent input as a factor leading to later diagnosis. 3. Continued misunderstanding of
the relationship between biological facts and, psychological facts due to adopting a
dualistic perspective. Dualism in this sense is the treatment of mind and body as if
they were totally separate entities. When I asked how the whole situation might be
improved, Professor Bentall suggested that a key factor was listening to clients or
patients. On later reading Bentall’s (2003) Madness Explained Psychosis and Human
Nature, I was surprised at the challenge to the validity of DSM IV diagnosis
presented by him. In my training as a psychotherapist (SPTI, 1994-2000) I learned
that DSM IV was a useful diagnostic tool, since it took into account both the impact
of society and the limited timescales of psychopathology. I was also surprised by
apparently valid challenges to the ‘scientific’ quantitative data on which some
psychiatric practice is based."

I went crazy in my early 20's, was diagnosed with 'acute schizophrenia' though for years I thought It was manic depression. Shortly after discharge I was medication free & have been ever since. I am now a Doctor of Psychotherapy Practice & have been fit as rather plump flea ever since. I will attach a model from my research concerning the planks on the bridge into 'mental illness' and the recovery planks back to everyday life. My advice is be careful with drugs, manage your stress-levels care-fully & question some of the 'bullsh' theory that surrounds mental illness.

All the best,

Roger
 

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deep true blue

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
11
Location
england
hello, thanks alot for that.
the forth paragraph seemed useful to me and the rest.
but thank you, drugs are definitely something id never do unless definitely needed prescribed drugs. :)
I know that schizophrenia gets a lot of bad stigma too which i knows not always true.

Its good you became better.
thanks for the reply it was really appreciated. :)
 
D

deep true blue

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
11
Location
england
I'm also not sure how you work the link computers aren't my strongest. :-D
I will figure it out though.
 
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