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What are Community Treatment Orders?

I

isthereanend

New member
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
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3
Hi my first time posting with the forum had no idea you existed but am so glad I found you!

My MIL suffers Mental Illness unfortunately she gets sectioned, takes medication is discharged, stops medication and we're on a roundabout of this happening.

They're now talking of a Community Treatment Order, can anyone explain in layman's terms what this exactly is? We've an appointment at the hospital on Sunday prior to her discharge but as my hubby will be next of kin what is his responsibilities etc.,

Many thanks in response to any replies. x
 
oneday

oneday

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Jan 28, 2010
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Location
London
I found this info and summarised a bit, hope it's plain enough, You can also get info e.g. from Mind's website: www.mind.org.uk and/or contact their Legal Advice Service for further info (details on the site)

Community Treatment Orders (CTOs) were introduced into law by the controversial Mental Health Act 2007, itself a series of amendments to the Mental Health Act 1983. A CTO is a legal order under which you can be discharged from formal detention in hospital under the Mental Health Act onto 'Supervised Community Treatment' (see below).

Supervised Community Treatment (SCT) is an arrangement where you are discharged from formal detention in hospital and required to comply with conditions set out in a Community Treatment Order, otherwise you may be recalled to hospital for treatment.

It allows patients to be treated in the community rather than in hospital. It applies only to patients currently/originally detained in hospital on a Section 3 or unrestricted sections of the Mental Health Act (Sections 37, 47, 48 and 51). It can last up to six months and can be renewed. You are subject to conditions, which, if broken, mean that you can be recalled to hospital.

If the CTO is revoked you can be detained in hospital for up to six months on Section 3 or the original unrestricted section of the Act. Note: a CTO does not authorise treatment without consent in the community, but does authorise treatment without consent in hospital following recall.

The Nearest Relative (Section 26 of the Mental Health Act)

The Mental Health Act gives a number of rights and responsibilities to a person it defines as your "Nearest Relative". If the nominated person prefers not to act as the Nearest Relative, he or she can nominate any other suitable person to take on the role.

If you have concerns about the selection of the Nearest Relative, speak to the Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) involved or contact an advocacy service. The 2007 Act enshrines the right to apply to County Court for an Order displacing your Nearest Relative.

The rights of the Nearest Relative are as follows:

• S/he can ask an Approved Mental Health Practitioner (AMHP) to arrange a formal mental health assessment for you, and can ask to be informed in writing if hospital admission is not the outcome.

• S/he may apply for you to be admitted to hospital based on the recommendations of two doctors (or one in an emergency).

• S/he has the right to be consulted if you are being assessed under the Mental Health Act and the right to information from an AMHP about his or her role as Nearest Relative, including his or her right to discharge you.

• S/he can prevent an application for a Treatment Order (Section 3) or Guardianship being made by withholding consent. He or she can discharge you from Guardianship (under Section 7).

• S/he may request your discharge from hospital under Sections 2 or 3. S/he may be overruled by a psychiatrist, but can then appeal to the Mental Health Review Tribunal.

• S/he has the right to be given seven days' notice by the hospital when you are about to be discharged, although you can ask the hospital not to inform him or her
 
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M

maudikie

Guest
Maudikie

The informatio from oneday is excellent. However I would ask why does she stop taking her medication. This is most important. Also has she, when in hospital, had a full physical examination, and been given a diagnosis of her mental health problem?
Do take the advice of Oneday, and also, you can ask for a carer''s assessment, and any support you are not getting can be noted down as an UNMET NEED,
Best wishes.
 
I

isthereanend

New member
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
3
Just to say thank you for the replies, she is now having an overnight stay at home and although I know the medical staff know what is best, in my opinion she is a long way from being herself. Thanks again I have printed and digested the information. x
 
M

maudikie

Guest
maudikie

Patients treated at home may come under the care of the G.P. They should have a full physical examination twelve monthly(or more if they feel they need it for a good reason) This checks on the suitability of their medication for their mental health condition, and MAY correct any side effects that they are getting. If your patient is having to return to hospital frequently as an in-patient, it may be to her advantage if she is sectioned whilst her medication is checked. She may be getting ill again through neglecting to take her medication. If she is living with you you can make a check on this. I have found that a dosette pill box is extremely helpful. The weeks medication can be put out into seperate doses and some of the boxes can have the days medication taken out in a small pack which the patient can take with them when they go out. She should gradually be encouraged to put the medication out for herself. She may need a reminder, and also for when she requires a repeat prescription from either G.P. or hospital, whichever is giving her her supply.:)
 
T

TherapyTribe

Member
Joined
May 15, 2010
Messages
16
HI



I agree just say thanks to ur replies.



thanks
 
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