Ways to maintain our mental health

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Hemera

New member
Joined
Dec 22, 2017
Messages
1
#1
Good day, dear community of mental health.

If I have your permission, I would like to share information and experiences with you, which mainly deal with mental illness. I have been concerned with this issue for the last few years, as I have noticed how more and more relatives, friends and acquaintances suffer from depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, posttraumatic stress disorders, anxiety and panic attacks (me included). I have full understanding if someone does not want to read this long message.

It was and still is very difficult (for me) to see how people you love lose the joy of life through these "diseases". Many who do not see a way out are looking for help in psychiatric hospitals and hope for an improvement in their well-being. I am not an expert or a doctor in this field, but I have assumed that perhaps so-called "antidepressants" can help. According to the experiences I have heard and read the past months and years, many of the health conditions deteriorate after taking "Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors". Various articles, studies and reports tell of the dangers, side effects and placebo effects of these drugs.

I was desperate because I wanted to help my family, friends, and all others who needed support. So I decided to inform myself extensively about mental illnesses, talked with these people about their problems and tried to figure out the causes. I also noticed that these diseases can affect everyone - no matter what race, skin color, country, sexuality, gender, body weight and height, ability, appearance, etc.

A short time later I became aware of an internship in a psychiatry. This offer was accepted immediately, because I wanted to know how people are treated there. Unfortunately the first day was quite a shock. The patients seemed as if they were bored most of the time and only lying in bed. Doctors and psychiatrists gave various medications to just keep them quiet. Strong side effects and risks are ignored. The patients knew I was a new employee and started a conversation with me to find out who I am. Common questions like, "Where are you from?", "How old are you?", "How long are you here?". I was able to talk to them quite normally and it was also interesting to be honest. My work colleagues were not very pleased, however, and told the patients to leave me alone, although they were usual conversations, nothing bad at all.

When there were problems, people quickly got medication and in some cases were even tied up. It may sound stupid, but it was like in a horror movie where the doctors and psychiatrists are crazy, not the patients. It breaks the heart to see how these people are treated. At first I thought that this is just a negative example, but unfortunately I always read from such clinics with catastrophic and inhuman conditions.

I also came across articles that recommend a nutritional change (food rich in zinc, B vitamins, C, D3 + K2, B3, B12, A, fiber, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, clean protein, coconut oil, ghee + an additional aid dietary supplements) & physical exercise to increase well-being. Some would recommend "antidepressants", MDMA, ketamine, (strong) psychedelics (DMT, iboga, ayahuasca), nootropics (e.g., Semax or Selank) or other substances but I believe that "drugs" are not a permanent solution. Yes, a balanced and healthy diet *can* combat or "cure" both physical and mental problems, but we should not forget that there is something else in life besides eating. By this I mean:

- two or three true friends who help you even in difficult times.

- a fulfilled career that aligns with your values, passions and goals + that *really* interests you and brings pleasure, joy and fun.

- a loving family & partner who support you.

- meaning in life. Some people want to be rich, have many pretty women, beautiful cars, materialism. Others just want to be a good father or mother. I myself prefer the "selfless path" and would like to help others + be a good friend. Everyone has a different purpose in life and that is all right.

It would be interesting to know how your experiences are and whether you might share them with us. You may have a few helpful tips and advice for those who suffer from such mental illness. I would be very happy if we could talk about this topic and exchange information. Everyone can learn something new.

Namasté.
 
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natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
10,852
#2
Hi Hemera,


Welcome aboard to MHF.


I happen to have schizophrenia based conditions, which are all under control via my medication.

I also use self help management, such as working ouit to fitness dvds, which I hope to do over this weekend, otherwise, early week; and also listening to music.

As it shouild so happen, I do have daily vitamin intake of c, b vitamins, although I am going to investigate in zinc, and also have calcium and vitamin d.


When they are rearing up their ugly heads, I suffer with acute hearing voices, anxiety, and paranoia, and on some occasions, all mixed up, otherwise, just one type of ailment on their own.

When I have hearing voices or paranoia problems, even though ah, I am on med, I sooner rather than later, put on my walkman listen to music, or musicals, and get my knitting or do my cross stitching work, and eventually t he ailment is then gone, I am much better, and also when able to do so, that the next time round I'll workout harder within, to my fitness dvds.


Thanks very much, for your post.
 
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natalie

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2014
Messages
10,852
#3
HI Herema,


I forgot to point out, that I'm considered to be a very well character of szchiophrenia, and not severely unwell.


Also, I try to be positive at all times, as long as my szchiophrenia ailments don't get in the way off course.
 
Prairie Sky

Prairie Sky

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2017
Messages
708
Location
Canada
#4
Welcome Hemera.

Your experience of life in a psych hospital is saddening. Unfortunately I've heard the same from many others. I've been fortunate in that respect; I went to a private hospital where the patients were respected and care was excellent. But I left labeled with what to me was a horrifying diagnosis - bipolar - and little knowledge of how to care for myself and navigate this new world of mental illness.

I still don't feel I have that mastered. But I do know that medication isn't the be all and end all. It does help me a lot and I'm thankful for it. But it takes a considerable amount of strength and discipline in everyday life to keep level and healthy. I do believe things like a good diet and exercise, religion, goals in life, friends - all help as much or more than meds.
 
Kerome

Kerome

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
12,749
Location
Europe
#5
Hi Hemera,

You are quite right, what you saw was not unusual. A lot of mental health facilitairs are like that, run by doctors who seem lost when pills do not work as an immediate treatment. Psychiatrists are supposed to be healers of the mind but they have largely abandoned talking therapy in favour of specialising on prescribing medications, which means they are often neutral at best when it comes to important facets of healing such as nutrition and vitamin therapy.

Am I right in thinking you are in Asia or India? It’s very interesting because medicine usage there is lower than in the western world, and for example recovery rates of schizophrenia are much better, say 65% with very good outcomes compared to 35% here.

But I have a theory that a lot of these diseases are caused by westernised society patterns... perhaps man is not meant to work a 9-5 job at 40 hours a week in great stress for years on end.

Namasté