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Wake up call... People are worth more than being treated like dirt.

Q

Queenie

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2016
Messages
245
Read the article many times. Sorry that the NHS mental health system is under strain and under-funded but it's not the patients fault.

Also when the healthcare professional start becoming complacent after being under stress with the strain of a under-staff and under-funded mental health system, they tend to loose any compassion they have and start to treat patient as annoying burdens and their attitudes become very negative (example: pigeon-holing all patients into being in-compliant with medications and treating all patients like that - it could be that particular patient is suffering side-effects and need to try another) that does not help the suffers of mental illness. I think it is a snowball effect and a vicious cycle.
 
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L

la femme folle

Guest
"Have you ever been spat at in a day’s work? I have. Have you ever been mooned at in a day’s work? No? Well, you’re obviously not a mental health nurse."

Is that standard for people with mh issues, I have never seen that happening or engaged in that type of behaviour. How does she know that all mh nurses have experienced that? Did she do a survey?

It's a bit stigmatising to be honest.

I don't know how anyone finds endorsing and helping administer ECT or holding a person down, taking down their undergarments, and injecting them with powerful psychoactive drugs "the best job in the world".

I don't know how anyone can see any of that as compassionate. If the woman had any compassion for her patients she wouldn't ever have liked her job or would maybe even left it a long time ago. :mad:
 
dermild

dermild

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 19, 2017
Messages
187
I think it's important to remember that mental health nurses are people, too.

Sure, they're not supposed to fall apart, because they cannot do their jobs if they do. The expectation that all of them can possess the pinnacle of mental health at all times is unrealistic. In this case, I think this person might need a re-assignment or an assessment.

Mental health workers are in the top 20 professions with a high suicide rate.

When I'm on the forum, and start to see too many threads about people wanting to kill themselves, it gets exhausting. I can avoid them, and can only imagine what it's like to take call after call after call and not being able to escape it. Threat after threat after threat, and you have to figure out who is at-risk and who might just need talking down.

It is ironic, in a forum that is to-the-brim with people who "can't take it," yet are quick to pass judgment upon someone else who seems to not be able to take it, either. It is odd when experiencing people who demand compassion for their issue, yet have none for someone else who develops that issue, too, especially when they acquire this issue while attempting to help others who have that issue.

All of it reminds me of a friend of mine who killed himself. I knew he had problems, but had no idea. His mother pushed him and berated him after he had to move back home, telling him he was always a loser who would never amount to anything. He didn't cry out. He didn't say he was "gonna do it." He just did it, and in such a way that it employed 4-5 methods that would have worked on their own. He wanted to be sure.

No doubt, some reform is in order. Implementation of a process where mental health workers receive regular MH check-ups and evaluations would be good, if they're not doing that already. Budget considerations are another problem.

When someone calls and is in dire need, they cannot be met with someone else who is also nearing the end of their rope. That's the ideal, understandable, and expected situation. Certainly, they should take a leave of absence or leave the field entirely if they're not capable. Then, instead of getting someone on the line who is less compassionate, you get put on hold, or get no one at all.

It's a hard situation. As much as I have compassion for someone who declares that they're going to kill themselves, be it a real threat or a need for attention, I feel that I should have this same compassion for someone who ends up in this boat, after dedicating their lives to getting others out of that boat.

The suicidal person has one boat: their own. The mental health workers has a sea full of boats, all headed in their direction. I'll be the first to confess that I don't think I could deal with it. That's why I don't do it.
 
L

la femme folle

Guest
I think it's important to remember that mental health nurses are people, too.

Sure, they're not supposed to fall apart, because they cannot do their jobs if they do. The expectation that all of them can possess the pinnacle of mental health at all times is unrealistic. In this case, I think this person might need a re-assignment or an assessment.

Mental health workers are in the top 20 professions with a high suicide rate.

When I'm on the forum, and start to see too many threads about people wanting to kill themselves, it gets exhausting. I can avoid them, and can only imagine what it's like to take call after call after call and not being able to escape it. Threat after threat after threat, and you have to figure out who is at-risk and who might just need talking down.

It is ironic, in a forum that is to-the-brim with people who "can't take it," yet are quick to pass judgment upon someone else who seems to not be able to take it, either. It is odd when experiencing people who demand compassion for their issue, yet have none for someone else who develops that issue, too, especially when they acquire this issue while attempting to help others who have that issue.

All of it reminds me of a friend of mine who killed himself. I knew he had problems, but had no idea. His mother pushed him and berated him after he had to move back home, telling him he was always a loser who would never amount to anything. He didn't cry out. He didn't say he was "gonna do it." He just did it, and in such a way that it employed 4-5 methods that would have worked on their own. He wanted to be sure.

No doubt, some reform is in order. Implementation of a process where mental health workers receive regular MH check-ups and evaluations would be good, if they're not doing that already. Budget considerations are another problem.

When someone calls and is in dire need, they cannot be met with someone else who is also nearing the end of their rope. That's the ideal, understandable, and expected situation. Certainly, they should take a leave of absence or leave the field entirely if they're not capable. Then, instead of getting someone on the line who is less compassionate, you get put on hold, or get no one at all.

It's a hard situation. As much as I have compassion for someone who declares that they're going to kill themselves, be it a real threat or a need for attention, I feel that I should have this same compassion for someone who ends up in this boat, after dedicating their lives to getting others out of that boat.

The suicidal person has one boat: their own. The mental health workers has a sea full of boats, all headed in their direction. I'll be the first to confess that I don't think I could deal with it. That's why I don't do it.
The woman doesn't say she is suicidal. Maybe it is easier to switch off and lack compassion than feel any as it would be too distressing? But why stay in a job that makes you end up that way? I know getting a job isn't easy from personal experience but I don't think psychiatric hospitals have ever been places full of compassion.

She is clearly using her experience to criticise the current government but it was the New Labour administration that brought in targets. They were pretty much as neoliberal as the Tories. From my experience there was always a lack of compassion in mh services.

But as you say it probably isn't good for your mental health working in such places, which might explain why it is better to switch off your empathy in order to cope with the job. :scratcheshead:
 
Kerome

Kerome

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
12,751
Location
Europe
I read the article and it put me in mind of my uncle, who was a housemaster at a psych ward for many years. Mostly he took care of making the tea and coffee from what I hear, and small jobs around the ward, so I don't think his schedule was as fraught as this nurse's.

But I don't think the nurse herself in the article suffered from mental health problems, I think she was more troubled by understaffing and not connecting to people during 1 hour appointments in the community, and too many reports to write. I don't blame her decision to step away from mental health care, if a job is no longer satisfying or giving you what you need then it's time to move on.

To me the points she makes look valid. It's as if the system has moved away from being heartful and giving room for people to express their compassion, to being more concerned with delivering value for the tax payer. In the end such systems for documenting the chain of events start imposing significant overheads, and it's wasted effort because often the paperwork is never looked at again.
 
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