UK Mental health campaigns simplifying and trivialising Mental health?

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JasonR28

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#1
I've been thinking about this for a while after seeing many campaigns and adverts in the last year about MH. Not sure what anyone else thinks?

I find ending the stigma campaigns generalise and make mental health problems seem basic and easily treated.


One campaign says if someone knows a friend who doesn't seem ok, then ask twice. Another tells people if they don't feel ok, then open up to their mates. Another says the help is there, just reach out. What if someone doesn't have friends?

When MH is featured on TV shows there's usually a helpline number after such as the BBC's helpline. It's filled with the usual go to the GP or phone the Samaritans.


That's another thing, the Samaritans are promoted as a miracle service but actually it's just a listening ear service and as many of us here will know, depending on who you get through to, are iffy at best.


The one that really irritates me though are the adverts featuring rich celebrities saying about their mental health problems and urging people to go for support. It's a bit different though isn't it? Them having the money to pay for the best treatment possible, whereas the average person has to go through the NHS and long waiting lists. I think they do it so people who don't have MH problems will say "They are so brave, well done them, I will follow them on social media now".


Often these adverts trivialise things and make out that MH problems are easily treated. There's constant campaigns saying things like 1 in 4 people will experience mental health problems some time in their life. Yes, maybe so, but a lot of those will be "mild" or in some cases people who see one of those campaigns, are having a 1 off low day and believe they have mental health problems when they don't.


I'm all for ending the stigma but FFS, mental health CAN be extremely severe leading to hospital admissions, harm, a poor quality of life and even death. A couple of silly campaigns like this treating MH as a common and easily treatable problem just would make it harder to get the right help overall.


Campaigns and advertising after all is the big voice out there. With adverts like these, I just feel it will encourage more people at the very mild/no mental health problems to go to the GP, which could mean more people who have severe MH problems end up not getting the help they need.

I.e if a GP see's 9 people saying they have MH problems but its very mild or no MH problems at all, how do you think the doctor will be towards the 10th person who has very severe MH problems? Perhaps treating them the same way as the previous 9?
 
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Jaye8525

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#2
I get what you are saying 100%, and I particularly relate to what you said in your closing paragraph.

When I'm really down I don't think any human being, doctor or not, can help me. Whose to say the doctor isn't just eager to get the shift over and go golfing with the lads, or go out to the club and get smashed on shots.

People are only human, and fallible. I feel only something superhuman like an angel could heal me because I'm either incredibly messed up, or out of touch with reality.

Peace.
 
schizolanza

schizolanza

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#3
I honestly feel like it's the general population with the issues
 
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dewey

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#4
I agree, it's bullshit and it's irritating as fuck. People are so ignorant and rarely have the empathy unless they've been through it themselves unfortunately. You have to go through it to know.
 
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dewey

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#5
It a positive step forward that there are actually programs about this now and celebrities do speak about their experience, but it's true we don't hear about how over stretched the NHS is and how hard to get proper therapy if you can't pay for the best. The reality is NHS treatment for depression is abysmal and this NEEDS more air time.
 
pepecat

pepecat

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#6
I agree a lot of the campaigns seem to the show the sort of....positive side....of MH issues - the 'I recovered and went back to work' stuff. I suppose in a way they have to, because they need to give hope to people, but at the same time the reality is that a lot of people can't work and don't recover.
There was a really god programme a couple of weeks or so ago - the Alastair Campbell one about depression. I know he's a public figure and all that, but it wasn't an easy watch in places; he was very open about his MH issues.
 
sadpunchingbag

sadpunchingbag

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#7
I know it needs to be talked about more. And be in school as a part of the curricula. Personally for me i just cant look at anything to do with advertising with mental health i just see all the floors and the way they portray it makes me pissed. Most likely a bad thing but i rather not look at it
 
Flameheart

Flameheart

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#8
mental health is a hot topic, they use it just to promote themselves and grasp at gullible audiences mainly
 

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