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Trauma-focused psychotherapies for PTSD in people with experiences of psychosis: A change in the status quo?

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firemonkee57

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Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Messages
8,224
Trauma-focused psychotherapies for PTSD in people with experiences of psychosis: A change in the status quo?

The effectiveness of Prolonged Exposure (PE) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in treating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has been well established. Indeed, they are recommended as first line treatments for PTSD in international treatment guidelines.

People who experience psychosis have traditionally been excluded from these trials. This is despite the fact that PTSD is a common comorbidity in psychosis (with 12.4% of people with psychosis also meeting criteria for PTSD) and that the presence of PTSD is associated with worse social and psychiatric outcomes in this group. The biological and psychological sequelae of trauma are also implicated in the genesis and maintenance of psychosis itself.

There has been some preliminary evidence for trauma-focused therapies being safe and effective for people experiencing psychosis. Despite this, the status quo of exclusion of people with psychosis from receiving evidence-based treatments for PTSD symptoms has remained. Van den Berg and colleagues’ RCT is long overdue and is a potential game changer in the landscape of psychological treatments for people experiencing psychosis… I hope.

http://www.thementalelf.net/mental-...nces-of-psychosis-a-change-in-the-status-quo/
 
SomersetScorpio

SomersetScorpio

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Aug 17, 2012
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Location
The West Country
I hope that these therapies do get offered to those who have/had psychotic symptoms.
I understand they need to risk assess and whatnot, but if the trials show that these therapies are indeed helping people who have suffered trauma, it doesn't seem right that they should be excluded.
 
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hillclimbs

Guest
Looking at the study, it was a small number of people studied and it would need a lot more studying to take that risk. When EMDR first came about, it was used for everyone, but there were a significant number of people who had psychotic episodes during treatment, so in my area now, they don't offer EMDR to people with complex/multiple trauma, for this reason.

I don't see it as being excluded, I would rather those that treat me would not risk further damaging my mind. I think slow and gentle (though time consuming and no doubt more expensive) is the best way to go when treating complex trauma.
 
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