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Too much medication?

P

pampope

New member
Joined
May 25, 2016
Messages
3
Greetings, all. I was hoping to get an opinion about my 62 year old husband's treatment. He was diagnosed with PTSD, manic-depression, paranoid personalty disorder, social and generalized anxiety, and ADHD about 3 years ago. He sees a psychiatrist for his Aderal (20 mg daily) as well as Escitalopram (20 mg. Daily) and Wellbrutin (300 mg) plus Hydroxyzine HCL for insomnia. He also takes Perindopril (4 mg) for high blood pressure. He seems to be in a bit of a daze most of the time and prone to emotional outbursts. In the past two years, he has also had two serious accidents with power tools that landed him in the ER. The last injury, to two fingers, required 25 stitches from a plastic surgeon. Plus he sleeps quite a bit. I wrote to his psychiatrist about a year ago to alert him to some of these issues but he just handed the letter to my husband at his next visit and suggested he had marital issues to work on. I know now that was not the right approach but I see these changes in him and do not know what else to do. I realize the fatigue may be caused by the underlying depression but I wanted a second opinion on all this medication. About six weeks ago, he was prescribed a CPAP machine for his snoring and has adjusted to that quite well. I had hoped a more restful night's sleep would improve his energy/alertness levels but any improvement was only temporary. His slowed reaction times, fuzzy thinking, and forgetfulness are a concern to me because he wants to take another week-long solo motorcycle trip. His mother had severe senile dementia but the brain scan he had last year after a possible TIA did not show any brain shrinkage or other abnormalities. I figure I might be the one with the problem -- an inability to accept that my husband is not going to get better. Thoughts?
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
17,160
Greetings, all. I was hoping to get an opinion about my 62 year old husband's treatment. He was diagnosed with PTSD, manic-depression, paranoid personalty disorder, social and generalized anxiety, and ADHD about 3 years ago. He sees a psychiatrist for his Aderal (20 mg daily) as well as Escitalopram (20 mg. Daily) and Wellbrutin (300 mg) plus Hydroxyzine HCL for insomnia. He also takes Perindopril (4 mg) for high blood pressure. He seems to be in a bit of a daze most of the time and prone to emotional outbursts. In the past two years, he has also had two serious accidents with power tools that landed him in the ER. The last injury, to two fingers, required 25 stitches from a plastic surgeon. Plus he sleeps quite a bit. I wrote to his psychiatrist about a year ago to alert him to some of these issues but he just handed the letter to my husband at his next visit and suggested he had marital issues to work on. I know now that was not the right approach but I see these changes in him and do not know what else to do. I realize the fatigue may be caused by the underlying depression but I wanted a second opinion on all this medication. About six weeks ago, he was prescribed a CPAP machine for his snoring and has adjusted to that quite well. I had hoped a more restful night's sleep would improve his energy/alertness levels but any improvement was only temporary. His slowed reaction times, fuzzy thinking, and forgetfulness are a concern to me because he wants to take another week-long solo motorcycle trip. His mother had severe senile dementia but the brain scan he had last year after a possible TIA did not show any brain shrinkage or other abnormalities. I figure I might be the one with the problem -- an inability to accept that my husband is not going to get better. Thoughts?
hi and I'm sorry

my thoughts run ths way: my bff is an RN in a Folks Home and if someone was displaying the amount of disruption your husband is they would reconsider his meds.

There is a certain sleeper a lot of folk get a lot of relief from and a good 8 hours, not sure what it is but its widely used in old aged hospitals.

ask some Q and maybe fnd a more medical type forum? I kow theres a lot they can do for agitation, you wouldn't leave a dog like that.

best of luck

BDU
 
Mayflower7

Mayflower7

Well-known member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 4, 2013
Messages
9,880
Location
England
Hi Pam,
So sorry what your going through, could always seek an second opinion from another dr. He shouldn't have given your husband your letter. Has his GP ruled out other possible causes for his forgetfulness?? Like UTI ( urinary tract infection), chest infection??? He may get better please don't give up hope yet. Lots of meds to calm and some for memory loss. Has he been to a sleep clinic?? Ever tried any meds for his sleep problems?? I hope you have some support
Take care
 
F

fatlady

Active member
Joined
May 4, 2016
Messages
31
Could ask a load of question to help me understand you and your husband, but that`s not the purpose of your post.
It appears to me that you are on top of his conditions and medications although you seem to be questioning it.
I think there is a need for career support. When last did you last have time for yourself, to spend some time without worrying about your husband? To talk to someone about your needs and to feel truly listened too.
These things give us help to carry on.
You need some positive stokes and to my mind reading your entry I can feel that you are a strong women, intelligent, caring, supportive, informed and strong.
Take care and stay strong
Regards
 
P

pampope

New member
Joined
May 25, 2016
Messages
3
Yes, he had been to a sleep clinic. He had been on Ambien but began to have episodes of sleep walking. He fell one night and had a severe cut on his forehead. I insisted he talk to his psychiatrist about that. That doctor switched him to Hydroxyzine (and I recently discovered his dose was twice what I had posted above). He dozes on the couch most evenings and then takes his Hydroxyzine to knock himself out overnight. I cannot seem to convince him that his sleep hygiene is bad. He just complains that he is tired all the timel.
 
P

pampope

New member
Joined
May 25, 2016
Messages
3
Could ask a load of question to help me understand you and your husband, but that`s not the purpose of your post.
It appears to me that you are on top of his conditions and medications although you seem to be questioning it.
I think there is a need for career support. When last did you last have time for yourself, to spend some time without worrying about your husband? To talk to someone about your needs and to feel truly listened too.
These things give us help to carry on.
You need some positive stokes and to my mind reading your entry I can feel that you are a strong women, intelligent, caring, supportive, informed and strong.
Take care and stay strong
Regards
I am strong but I feel I come up way short on the compassion/support scale. It scares the crap out of me that the rest of our years together are going to be a progressive march toward someplace I really do not want to go. I have taken over the bulk of household responsibilities and may soon hire someone to do the yardwork. His last accident was when he stuck his fingers under a running lawnmower. He is not careful around power tools and I am surprised he has not done more damage to himself than he has. I do get out and have a number of hobbies. I figure when I am out of the house, he can zone out on the couch without me pushing him to get up and do something. On two recent trips, he completely forgot to pack all his meds and I had to overnight them to his hotel. I try to help him remember stuff but he resents that. We have been married almost 37 years and, as we near retirement age, I just never imagined life would take his direction. We don't really discuss the situation, we just adjust and carry on.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
17,160
I am strong but I feel I come up way short on the compassion/support scale. It scares the crap out of me that the rest of our years together are going to be a progressive march toward someplace I really do not want to go. I have taken over the bulk of household responsibilities and may soon hire someone to do the yardwork. His last accident was when he stuck his fingers under a running lawnmower. He is not careful around power tools and I am surprised he has not done more damage to himself than he has. I do get out and have a number of hobbies. I figure when I am out of the house, he can zone out on the couch without me pushing him to get up and do something. On two recent trips, he completely forgot to pack all his meds and I had to overnight them to his hotel. I try to help him remember stuff but he resents that. We have been married almost 37 years and, as we near retirement age, I just never imagined life would take his direction. We don't really discuss the situation, we just adjust and carry on.
I'm really sorry.

its awful to see your loved one change and be unable to do anything about it

one thing does seem clear - your husband is starting to need assisted living. As I said I have friends in Aged Care on all ranks and get offended on their behalf because I know what extremes they go to to care for their patients. Far from being a Hell Hole of unconcerned beasts your average Old Folks Home is packed to the rafters with staff who CARE and make the experience of the patient a pleasant surprise.

You are ageing too and he may inadvertently hurt you, fall on you, back over you - a myriad of Accidents waiting to happen that you are going to be less and less able to avert or deal with.

we all face the pain of ageing and if your spouse ages at a different rate it can be very painful to watch and also come with a bit of survivor guilt.

I would seriously start calling around for some Residential Care or In House support because the issues tend to get worse not better also quite quickly at times.

I'm very sorry you are going through this, I wish I could do more to help. There may well be some sort of support group you can both go to together, to learn how to cope with these changes, how others cope.

My bff mum is 10 years younger than her 85 year old husband who still has all his faculties and does all her care.

How he copes we don't know but he refuses to Not Cope; they are now in assisted living and he tells them to go away.

:shrug: even if help is there, people aren't always comfortable about taking it.

I can understand why. Getting old and frail is no joke.
 
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