Tips on maintaining Mental Health?

Shiro

Shiro

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Aug 1, 2013
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Georgia, USA
#1
As of currently I do not see a counselor or doctor.
I am not on medications.
I have depression and anxiety.

As of the last two days I've been feeling "up" mostly.
I have been maintaining myself through a journal with:
Advice,
Goals,
& Worksheets/Analysis of Self.

Anything that I could add to this journal such as:
Mantras,
More worksheet ideas,
Social skills,
Anxiety managing skills,
Depression managing skills, etc.
Would be helpful.

I also have a email mentor, which helps some, having someone to listen.

I plan on becoming more active (asked my fiance today to help me with 1+ workouts daily)

What else can I do to improve or maintain my happy, hopeful mood?
 
A

azzza

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Jul 28, 2013
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62
#2
My main piece of advice is - pace yourself - do not commit to too much too quickly, you will get tired then yo will feel bad again.
Learn to say "no" whether it is to people who want you to do things or people who want you to eat or drink things, or anything else where you have in the past let people persuade you to do things that later proved to be wrong for you.
Learn to say "yes" to things that are good for you and that you enjoy even if other people may need to make concessions in some way for you to do them.
Get enough sleep.
It all sounds very simple, but I have good friends who have recovered well from illness but who have over committed themselves whilst feeling good then got over tired or over stretched by them after. I have also seen good friends who feel they have disrupted other people's lives enough while they were ill and that they mustn't do it any more now they are well and through that have not been able to do the things that would have helped them stay well. I wish you all the luck in the world with staying well and every happiness
 
Shiro

Shiro

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Location
Georgia, USA
#3
I'll be sure to add your advice into my journal.
My fiance actually had to tell me this morning, "you're not calling the crisis people today, it can wait, you need to worry about being happy before you worry about everything else. they will understand if you wait a week and then set everything up."
I'm gonna keep up on the journal, try to be active in things online that I enjoy, listen to music, and create art.
That sounds like a good day. :p
 
D

diddypinks

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#4
google moodscope my cpn told me about this you go on there every day and you make a graph of your moods your ups and downs this is good because you can look at what was happening when you were low and well etc. anyone can do it and its free:)
 
Shiro

Shiro

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#5
this will be googled, that can be an extention of my mood calendar, thank you.
 
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Alexa08

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Feb 26, 2014
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#6
Just always focus on the brighter side of things. Always think positive and you will see that your life will be positive too. Negativity will not help you anyway, so why worry? If you can just smile and appreciate the everything that you have. Being mentally healthy is a state of mind. Think healthy and be healthy!
 
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azzza

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#7
If you suffer from chronic depression looking on the bright side and being positive is not how it works. Obviously ifyou could be that upbeat all the time you would not suffer from chronic depression or anxiety. Also nothing more depressing than either faking positivity or being near someone like that. If you are prone to clinical depression and ate well at the moment then it is about keeping healthy, not overdoing it, sleep and avoiding fake happy or fake anything people! Telling people to focus on positive is rather like telling them to pull themselves together when they are ill!
 
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Alexa08

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#8
Meditation and relaxation are best antidote against stress. Looking at the brighter side of life is not allowing yourself to deceive you or to be in a state of denial but instead it will help you feel better while passing thru depression. There is always sunshine after the rain. We only appreciate happiness when we experienced loneliness, there is always two sides of a coin and thus our lives.
 
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azzza

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#9
Meditation is good for some people and avoiding really negative people can help but staying healthy eating well sleeping and the best ways of preventing falling back. Everyone is different some people need to keep busy others need to rest more. Some need to block bad thoughts some need to have a plan or deal with bad things. It's about finding what works for you.
 
calypso

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#10
Meditation and relaxation are best antidote against stress. Looking at the brighter side of life is not allowing yourself to deceive you or to be in a state of denial but instead it will help you feel better while passing thru depression. There is always sunshine after the rain. We only appreciate happiness when we experienced loneliness, there is always two sides of a coin and thus our lives.
If only it was so simple...

I find this and your last post extremely unhelpful and simplistic. I don't know if you have ever gone through a major mental illness, but this would not help on any level. This comes along with "pull your socks up", "stop moaning" and all we need to do is go out, exercise and all the hallucinations, suicidal ideas, desperate pain and despair - will all magically disappear. Meditation is often not possible as it requires a level of concentration and ability to relax. Sorry but you are way off beam here.

Honestly, a positive attitude is just not possible in many cases. Perhaps it might be an idea to look around the forum, read a lot more posts that others have written and try to see things from their point of view.
 
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azzza

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#11
Well said Calypso ! Both of those posts made me so angry. I know some people can meditate but for others it can be a highly distressing experience even trying. I find advice that says look on the bright side, be positive, and get on with it dangerous, unhelpful, and patronising. "Sunshine after rain" and phrases like that do not sound like someone who has experienced the unremitting blackness of true depression and the abject terror of it returning.
Thank you Calypso for adding your opinion to the discussion I was feeling quite upset by these silly comments it's nice to know that I'm not in a minority of one, which is how I feel so often.
 
ScaredCat

ScaredCat

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#12
My main piece of advice is - pace yourself - do not commit to too much too quickly, you will get tired then yo will feel bad again.
Learn to say "no" whether it is to people who want you to do things or people who want you to eat or drink things, or anything else where you have in the past let people persuade you to do things that later proved to be wrong for you.
Learn to say "yes" to things that are good for you and that you enjoy even if other people may need to make concessions in some way for you to do them.
Get enough sleep.
It all sounds very simple, but I have good friends who have recovered well from illness but who have over committed themselves whilst feeling good then got over tired or over stretched by them after. I have also seen good friends who feel they have disrupted other people's lives enough while they were ill and that they mustn't do it any more now they are well and through that have not been able to do the things that would have helped them stay well. I wish you all the luck in the world with staying well and every happiness
Well said Calypso ! Both of those posts made me so angry. I know some people can meditate but for others it can be a highly distressing experience even trying. I find advice that says look on the bright side, be positive, and get on with it dangerous, unhelpful, and patronising. "Sunshine after rain" and phrases like that do not sound like someone who has experienced the unremitting blackness of true depression and the abject terror of it returning.
Thank you Calypso for adding your opinion to the discussion I was feeling quite upset by these silly comments it's nice to know that I'm not in a minority of one, which is how I feel so often.
Well if you are in the minority I am there with you. Everything you say is how it is with me. I try (well i think i do) really hard but always seem to end up going further backwards than forwards. Both my head and my body seem to work against me
 
Kerome

Kerome

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#13
It's hard to know exactly what to add, given that you suffer depression and anxiety I would think about adding these to your regime...

Positive affirmations - these are basically statements to yourself, it can help
Vitamins and nutrients - it's important to get these right, depression can be caused by a vitamin deficiency
Food intolerances - another thing that can cause low energy and depression, try and visit a nutritionist would be my advice to do this and vitamins in one
Sleep and good habits - a regular sleep pattern and good sleep habits are so important to good mental health (which you already knew)
Exercise and fresh air - walking, cycling, swimming and so on are all very good for boosting the body and not getting stuck mentally
Giving and helping - finding a way to give to others and help them can make you feel a lot better about yourself, maybe try volunteering or helping the elderly
Rewarding yourself - despite being depressed, keep trying to find the things you enjoy and reward yourself by doing them, even if they're small like the occasional ice cream

Hope that helps!
 
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azzza

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#14
I agree kerome that vitamins can help, I simply bought some age appropriate ones from boots and within a fortnight I felt better. I was the biggest cynic ever before that but now I really believe these have helped me stay moderately well. Vitamins ate an inexpensive thing to try that can really help
 
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Nicola398

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#15
I am not sure if it is a good idea to take some vitamins with anti-psychotics.I bought some vit C and a multi vitamin and I think that is overstimulating my brain,I am finding it hard to concentrate and keep my attention span going, also i am being absent minded more than usual and feel my head to be empty and unfocused on whatever i am doing,physically i feel thirsty more and as if I am extremely exhausted all the time.I am going to stop taking the supplements for a while to see if these effects go away.I read on someone elses' post who knew of these things that taken with anti-psychotics vitamin C can have these effects as it is activating combined with anti psychotics.
 
R

Rose19602

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#16
I've been on a similar path to you for a year or so now....following chronic anxiety / depression.

I would say that time is the best healer when you come off meds. It takes a while to get the withdrawl reactions out of your system and I found that the way I felt "evolved". It was best not to consider any emotional state as permanent for quite some time....until I felt confident and grounded again.

I've found that I have gradually become much more stable, less anxious and the depression....for me at least....has not reappeared. The anxiety and effects of the years on ADs has not been so easy to rid myself of, and it reappears under pressure.

Stress is the trigger for my mental health / reactions getting out of hand...and there have been hurdles and bumps. The key for me, I think, is to recognise the triggers and to eliminate as much of the stress as I can. Maybe you should identify your triggers?

I think that if you have been very unwell or chronically affected you always carry a fear of symptoms returning and have an innate sensor that activates that fear when you start to go downhill.

I would say, keep in touch with that sensor and be aware. If you can do this, you stand a fair chance of maintaining good mental health by avoiding situations which you are likely to struggle with....not always easy!!

The other well-being advice will help you in your efforts to be healthy and feel good, and I agree that it can help enormously to seek out calm, healthy eating, moderate exercise, quality sleep and all those other things that contribute to a healthy body and mind.
Good luck
x
 
Kerome

Kerome

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#17
I am not sure if it is a good idea to take some vitamins with anti-psychotics.I bought some vit C and a multi vitamin and I think that is overstimulating my brain,I am finding it hard to concentrate and keep my attention span going, also i am being absent minded more than usual and feel my head to be empty and unfocused on whatever i am doing,physically i feel thirsty more and as if I am extremely exhausted all the time.I am going to stop taking the supplements for a while to see if these effects go away.I read on someone elses' post who knew of these things that taken with anti-psychotics vitamin C can have these effects as it is activating combined with anti psychotics.
I'm sensitive myself to moderately large doses of magnesium which are in a lot of multivitamins, so I can relate, it makes my brain go hyper active. I've never heard that vitamins and antipsychotics cause problems. But it's a question of finding what works. High amounts of niacin B6 for example has had good effects on some psychotics, even functioning as a cure for a few people or so I hear. Large amounts of vitamin C are rarely a problem, and help for some. So it's a question of being observant, seeing if it helps, and if things go wrong just stop taking them for a while.
 
R

Rose19602

Guest
#18
Could the thirst be something to do with the diabetes Nicola, and the confusion to do with the thyroid issues?
It's hard to attribute cause sometimes isn't it?
I hope you're feeling OK in general. I've sent you a PM.
x
 
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azzza

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#19
I can't see that vitamin C in normal doses could harm anyone. I avoid anything that goes over 100% recommended daily dose anyway as I know you can overdo vitamin A plus I don't absorb b 12 orally. I think it's a coincidence that you have symptoms from your anti psychotics if you are taking a normal dose of vitamins. The vitamins I take are designed by Boots for women over 50 and they have between 50% and 100% of the recommended amounts of each vitamin. I would not suggest high doses of vitamins as it could be bad for you if you take the wrong ones.
 
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Nicola398

Guest
#20
hi again all, I have had a good night's sleep and woke today and the feeling of overstimulation in my brain is gone.I deffo think it was because of the vitamins so i am not taking them today.I think it is just my brain being sensitive to them and as I said I hear say that with some anti-psychotics vitamin C can be activating. We do not all respond to vitamin and drug combinations in the same way and I think for me I shouldn't take them.I am not saying that for those who are helped by taking vitamin C that that is not a good idea to take it but just so you know if you do get that overactive feeling in the head it may be caused by the effects of taking vitamins combined with anti psychotics.