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Those with Bipolar Disorder, 3 X’s More Likely to Develop Diabetes

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Keesha

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Apparently those with bipolar disorder are three times more likely to become diabetic.



The relationship between bipolar disorder and diabetes type 2



This is worth looking into. I had no idea until now.
 
Tawny

Tawny

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I think it is mostly due to those taking antipsychotics.

My medication, Lamotrigine, does interfere with sugar levels, i don't know the details though.

It is also hard to eat properly when unwell.

Depression makes me less active so that is another problem.
 
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keith74

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I think it is mostly due to those taking antipsychotics.

Yes a common side effect of a lot of the antipsychotics is that it makes you crave sugar. This is the reason for the weight gain and added risk of diabetes. My wife had big sugar cravings when she first started taking olanzapine and quetiapine (the cravings seemed to have leveled off somewhat over time). It took a lot of discipline to keep the cravings in check.
 
Tawny

Tawny

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Yes a common side effect of a lot of the antipsychotics is that it makes you crave sugar. This is the reason for the weight gain and added risk of diabetes. My wife had big sugar cravings when she first started taking olanzapine and quetiapine (the cravings seemed to have leveled off somewhat over time). It took a lot of discipline to keep the cravings in check.
I found i was craving bread. I was always desperate for the next meal! It was difficult to cope with as was the weight gain, but people say that after a while, it stabilises.

Olanzapine, according to my CPN, 10mg per day is the point at which weight gain becomes a problem.
 
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keith74

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I found i was craving bread. I was always desperate for the next meal! It was difficult to cope with as was the weight gain, but people say that after a while, it stabilises.

Olanzapine, according to my CPN, 10mg per day is the point at which weight gain becomes a problem.

Oh yes, carbs for sure! Makes sense since carbs are a type of sugar. My wife would easily clean off bags of potato chips or eat a whole loaf of bread on her own. We got to the point where we just couldn't keep any in the house at all.
 
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PTSD is well known to commonly co-occur with mood disorders, including bipolar disorder. Studies indicate that people with bipolar disorder are nearly 10 times more likely to be diagnosed with PTSD than the general population.

(Except in the UK)
 
Tawny

Tawny

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PTSD is well known to commonly co-occur with mood disorders, including bipolar disorder. Studies indicate that people with bipolar disorder are nearly 10 times more likely to be diagnosed with PTSD than the general population.

(Except in the UK)
I have seen on TV people with PTSD who have difficulty stopping eating. One man, ex military i think he was, gained so much weight due to PTSD.

Bipolar and PTSD are different disorders though. They would only occur together if a person had bipolar disorder and had been through a traumatic event, which is down to chance. Obviously there are people with PTSD who may develop bipolar disorder due to the stress of a traumatic event.
 
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Comorbidity

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I have seen on TV people with PTSD who have difficulty stopping eating. One man, ex military i think he was, gained so much weight due to PTSD.

I have 2 fold C-PTSD it's very easy to see exactly why bipolar sufferers are 10x more likely to develop it through trauma. The incredibly increased intensity, combined with the highly accelerated mind. A bipolar sufferers severe trauma is not only more intense and severe than a neurotypical persons, their highly accelerated mind means they're effectively experiencing it 10 x or more longer than a neuro typical person too - Not rocket science
 
Tawny

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I have 2 fold C-PTSD it's very easy to see exactly why bipolar sufferers are 10x more likely to develop it through trauma. The incredibly increased intensity, combined with the highly accelerated mind. A bipolar sufferers severe trauma is not only more intense and severe than a neurotypical persons, their highly accelerated mind means they're effectively experiencing it 10 x or more longer than a neuro typical person too - Not rocket science

Neurotypical? I thought that referred to Autism.
I'm not sure i agree but that is ok.
 
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Comorbidity

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Neurotypical? I thought that referred to Autism.
I'm not sure i agree but that is ok.

'Neurotypical or NT, an abbreviation of neurologically typical, is a neologism widely used in the autistic community as a label for non-autistic people.'

“Neurotypical” is a newer term that's used to describe individuals of typical developmental, intellectual, and cognitive abilities. In other words, it's not used to describe individuals who have autism or another developmental difference."
 
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Comorbidity

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I'm not sure i agree but that is ok.

It is ok, it is true for me and makes perfect logical sense to me, maybe it's the culmination of my conditions

I have incredible intensity - In severe trauma I experience that more intensely

I have always been incredibly meticulous, explored things and found new depths in them that other people hadn't and consider and explore every possible angle - So in trauma, if you consider the rumination and all the what if's and buts, together with the paranoia creating even more, it's already a far more severe experience of trauma than most normal people

Then consider the first 2 things that are different to normal people that will make severe trauma worse for me combined with how incredibly accelerated my mind is, and I'm doing more than normal people and doing it at least 5 times more every single minute, so my trauma is effectively over 10 times as severe as a normal persons

As an idea of how accelerated my mind has been when just hypomanic, I took a critical safety test, scheduled for 1 hour 30 minutes, you could leave as soon as you'd completed it, I completed the test, quadruple checked every answer, thought I had taken my time, got up to leave and wondered why everyone was staring at me, walked outside which took about 5 minutes, took out my phone and realised I'd completed the test in 12 minutes, and I scored 100%, the next person came out around the hour mark, just before or after and most probably had not quadruple checked every answer as I had and when manic my head is even more accelerated
 
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Tawny

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It is ok, it is true for me and makes perfect logical sense to me, maybe it's the culmination of my conditions

I have incredible intensity - In severe trauma I experience that more intensely

I have always been incredibly meticulous, explored things and found new depths in them that other people hadn't and consider and explore every possible angle - So in trauma, if you consider the rumination and all the what if's and buts, together with the paranoia creating even more, it's already a far more severe experience of trauma than most normal people

Then consider the first 2 things that are different to normal people that will make severe trauma worse for me combined with how incredibly accelerated my mind is, and I'm doing more than normal people and doing it at least 5 times more every single minute, so my trauma is effectively over 10 times as severe as a normal persons

As an idea of how accelerated my mind has been when just hypomanic, I took a critical safety test, scheduled for 1 hour 30 minutes, you could leave as soon as you'd completed it, I completed the test, quadruple checked every answer, thought I had taken my time, got up to leave and wondered why everyone was staring at me, walked outside which took about 5 minutes, took out my phone and realised I'd completed the test in 12 minutes, and I scored 100%, the next person came out around the hour mark, just before or after and most probably had not quadruple checked every answer as I had and when manic my head is even more accelerated

I can imagine the speed of thought, the crowded thoughts, makes PTSD so much worse for you. I have some similar problems which is why i am up at 4am, my thoughts are upsetting so i have to get up because they won't switch off but i am not even hypomanic. Is that part of what you mean?

That is interesting about your test as i did a brief exam once and was the first to finish. I was desperate to beat this one other person on the course and was speeding through it. We kept looking at each other, i could tell he was wanting to beat me :) I got 100%. When not hypomanic, i would not have done as well. It is an interesting thing.
 
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Comorbidity

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I can imagine the speed of thought, the crowded thoughts, makes PTSD so much worse for you. I have some similar problems which is why i am up at 4am, my thoughts are upsetting so i have to get up because they won't switch off but i am not even hypomanic. Is that part of what you mean?

That is interesting about your test as i did a brief exam once and was the first to finish. I was desperate to beat this one other person on the course and was speeding through it. We kept looking at each other, i could tell he was wanting to beat me :) I got 100%. When not hypomanic, i would not have done as well. It is an interesting thing.

The development of both my C-PTSD's was through experiencing severe trauma over a prolonged time period while manic for the reasons stated

I wasn't trying to beat anyone in my tests, part of my being on the autism spectrum also gives me incredibly intense focus and isolation, the time it took me would be no different if there weren't any other people in the room, when I focus like that it is as if I am in the room on my own.

Hypomania, and mania, in the right environment and combined with the incredible intense focus and isolation of my autism spectrum traits is an exceptionally powerful thing, you can do things to a quality and quantity that are actually superhuman that other people can't, other people, especially neurotypical people really don't like that, they do not like that at all
 
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Keesha

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Thank you for educating me. Some of these things make a lot of sense.
Somehow I didn’t make the connection but now do.
 
jajingna

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I find diabetes scary. It was a reason I changed my diet over a year ago. While taking the antipsychotic quetiapine (seroquel) for a few years I was eating loads of sweet stuff, cookies and a bunch of other junk daily, just a terrible diet. Put on lots of weight. I stumbled on an article about getting away from sugar, and I also stopped taking medication about the same time I tried going keto/low-carb. Pretty hard at first, but adjusted by sticking with it. I live with a brother who continues to eat the same old junk so it's always around but I'm not interested in it anymore. I think that medication does cause craving somehow. Got another brother who takes it and he got fat too.

Another thing I've heard about is insulin resistance, which can lead to diabetes, is also thought to raise the risk of dementia such as Alzheimer's and that that is higher in diabetics, which is pretty scary too. Some have even called Alzheimer's type 3 diabetes, suggesting that insulin resistance can reach the brain. I think the cells then are not getting fed properly or something, leading to damage. Of course it is all way more complicated than this, this is just a rough idea based on a small bit of info I read and a few videos I watched.
 
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