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Thinking I Can Make People Anxious

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DaDaDoeDoe

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
5
Location
Bay Area
Hey, so does anyone here think they have like a magic power to make people anxious. Sometimes it feels like if i just am anxious or having feelings of anxiety I can like send that anxiety to people without really doing anything. I also don't just mean to people I'm having a conversation with, I also mean people in the street below my apartment or even far away down the street, people who shouldn't be able to see me or hear me really. Sometimes it even feels like I can even make the birds around my house uncomfortable, like once i start to have the feelings of anxiety they chirp less or their chirps are more strained. It makes it really hard to relax and i like try super hard to not make the people or animals around me uncomfortable.
 
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Summerof76

Active member
Joined
Oct 6, 2019
Messages
33
Location
Wales, UK
Hey, so does anyone here think they have like a magic power to make people anxious. Sometimes it feels like if i just am anxious or having feelings of anxiety I can like send that anxiety to people without really doing anything. I also don't just mean to people I'm having a conversation with, I also mean people in the street below my apartment or even far away down the street, people who shouldn't be able to see me or hear me really. Sometimes it even feels like I can even make the birds around my house uncomfortable, like once i start to have the feelings of anxiety they chirp less or their chirps are more strained. It makes it really hard to relax and i like try super hard to not make the people or animals around me uncomfortable.
Hi Dadadoedoe,
Have you spoken to a professional about your feelings? It would be a good idea to confide in your doctor about how you feel, as what you've described appears to be paranoia.

It's not unusual for the moods of others to affect our own and visa versus, but that has its basis in body language and how we come across to others. Humans are just complex animals- we may communicate through language, but we unconsciously communicate through gestures, body language, eye-contact, smell, etc and even tiny changes in someone else are picked up by us. Even if we don't know it!
If someone is anxious, their body language and facial gestures, voice tone and language style, reflect that. Our brains (wonderful things!) will read the different signals and out them together to come to a conclusion about how another is feeling and thus, how they will react to us. And we empathise- we 'feel' what they're feeling and mirror them.
The same with all emotions- you can tell if someone is happy and as humans, it can 'catch'.

But some people are more sensitive to interpersonal communication than others and they absorb the atmospheric tensions more.

However, these are not things picked up on when others aren't actually with or communicating with you or in fleeting moments, such as passing someone on the street. Someone in the apartment below you will definitely not know how you are feeling, unless you went and told them. In fact, they are probably too busy dealing with their own life issues that you are no more than the person who lives in the apartment upstairs.
On a day-to-day basis, other people are thinking about themselves and those closest to them- not neighbours or strangers.

When it comes to the birds around- again, you can reason that they don't feel uncomfortable around you. How can they? A birds aim in life is to survive- to eat, stay away from predators and adverse weather conditions, and to breed. They don't have the cognitive functioning to recognise human anxiety.
If you recognise a change in their chirp, you are super-perceptive and you should pat yourself on the back for even noticing. Most humans don't take the time out to listen to the communication of birds. I live in amongst a lot of seagulls and wow- do they have a unique communication system! Birds, like us, communicate with each other- food, predators and even signals (both flight patterns and chirps) to tend young. Birds chirp to signal us as predators- all humans, not just you. The seagulls round my area even shout at each other when I let my cats out. They also try to attack them, but that's another story! (Seagulls are modern day pterodactyls!)

I know- easier said than done- but try to reason with the thoughts that you have and seek a professionals help. Our thoughts and feelings effect us- not others. It's our behaviours that affect others. At the moment, you have a distorted perception of the amount of power your thoughts and feelings have over other people and the environment around you and you may need support in reasoning with those thoughts.

Take care.
 
D

DaDaDoeDoe

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
5
Location
Bay Area
Hi Dadadoedoe,
Have you spoken to a professional about your feelings? It would be a good idea to confide in your doctor about how you feel, as what you've described appears to be paranoia.

It's not unusual for the moods of others to affect our own and visa versus, but that has its basis in body language and how we come across to others. Humans are just complex animals- we may communicate through language, but we unconsciously communicate through gestures, body language, eye-contact, smell, etc and even tiny changes in someone else are picked up by us. Even if we don't know it!
If someone is anxious, their body language and facial gestures, voice tone and language style, reflect that. Our brains (wonderful things!) will read the different signals and out them together to come to a conclusion about how another is feeling and thus, how they will react to us. And we empathise- we 'feel' what they're feeling and mirror them.
The same with all emotions- you can tell if someone is happy and as humans, it can 'catch'.

But some people are more sensitive to interpersonal communication than others and they absorb the atmospheric tensions more.

However, these are not things picked up on when others aren't actually with or communicating with you or in fleeting moments, such as passing someone on the street. Someone in the apartment below you will definitely not know how you are feeling, unless you went and told them. In fact, they are probably too busy dealing with their own life issues that you are no more than the person who lives in the apartment upstairs.
On a day-to-day basis, other people are thinking about themselves and those closest to them- not neighbours or strangers.

When it comes to the birds around- again, you can reason that they don't feel uncomfortable around you. How can they? A birds aim in life is to survive- to eat, stay away from predators and adverse weather conditions, and to breed. They don't have the cognitive functioning to recognise human anxiety.
If you recognise a change in their chirp, you are super-perceptive and you should pat yourself on the back for even noticing. Most humans don't take the time out to listen to the communication of birds. I live in amongst a lot of seagulls and wow- do they have a unique communication system! Birds, like us, communicate with each other- food, predators and even signals (both flight patterns and chirps) to tend young. Birds chirp to signal us as predators- all humans, not just you. The seagulls round my area even shout at each other when I let my cats out. They also try to attack them, but that's another story! (Seagulls are modern day pterodactyls!)

I know- easier said than done- but try to reason with the thoughts that you have and seek a professionals help. Our thoughts and feelings effect us- not others. It's our behaviours that affect others. At the moment, you have a distorted perception of the amount of power your thoughts and feelings have over other people and the environment around you and you may need support in reasoning with those thoughts.

Take care.
Thank you this was very reassuring :)
 
toutatis

toutatis

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2018
Messages
472
Location
Auckland, NZ
@DaDaDoeDoe

Just wanted to say I can totally relate. Maybe not so much regarding the birds or other animals but definitely with people, yes. The effect or perception of reality is changed so much by the state of mind, so it would seem. And when my social anxiety is triggered severely, it's best I remove myself from being around people because I simply can't handle the intensity of the awful reality in front of me. It's a form of madness I tells you.
 
D

DaDaDoeDoe

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
5
Location
Bay Area
@DaDaDoeDoe

Just wanted to say I can totally relate. Maybe not so much regarding the birds or other animals but definitely with people, yes. The effect or perception of reality is changed so much by the state of mind, so it would seem. And when my social anxiety is triggered severely, it's best I remove myself from being around people because I simply can't handle the intensity of the awful reality in front of me. It's a form of madness I tells you.
Yah i try not to avoid it, it just feeds it. it's a constant battle
 
toutatis

toutatis

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2018
Messages
472
Location
Auckland, NZ
@DaDaDoeDoe
Okay, our experience must be a little different then. It gives me panic attacks. Yes, it's a constant battle. I'm glad the birds haven't turned on me, though. They're the one thing who bring me meaning in my lows.

Stay strong!
 
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