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Theos Report: Religion Is Good For Your Mental Health?

Per Ardua Ad Astra

Per Ardua Ad Astra

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I caught sight of a leader comment in The Guardian yesterday, and it made reference to a think tank I had never heard of before, Theos.

Apparently, Theos has produced a report exploring the link between religion, wellbeing, and good mental health.

One of the claims is that religion can be better for your MH, than say sport.

Not sure what people make of this, but a think tank dedicated just to this sort of issue, was worth putting out there I thought, so here's the link:

Religion good for your mental health, says new study - @theosthinktank - Theos Think Tank

:)
 
BrianHorlicks

BrianHorlicks

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Sorry to offend,
(I hope not.)
How can narrowing your mind be good for you?
Is it because of the routine and rigid structure of religion that could help?

I still stand by what I believe,
Mental health problems are spiritual awakenings.
 
shaky

shaky

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Sorry to offend,
(I hope not.)
How can narrowing your mind be good for you?
Is it because of the routine and rigid structure of religion that could help?
Two reasons
1. Being in a religious community means having support and friendship which are both good for mental wellbeing
2. Discipline brings Freedom. By following spiritual practices - meditation, prayer, self-denial etc., we can become better people and free ourselves from the crazy, helter-sketler, commercial, capitilist world that is causing a great deal of mental illness.
 
B

billym4467

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the problem i think, is your either a believer or your not. ive no doubt for many reasons religion can help with MH. but you cant make yourself believe.
 
BrianHorlicks

BrianHorlicks

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Two reasons
1. Being in a religious community means having support and friendship which are both good for mental wellbeing
2. Discipline brings Freedom. By following spiritual practices - meditation, prayer, self-denial etc., we can become better people and free ourselves from the crazy, helter-sketler, commercial, capitilist world that is causing a great deal of mental illness.
I just couldn't believe that God is separate,
For the past 42 years (I am 47)
It's not made sense.

I am free from what you mention,
It's just that I've chose to live this way.
Surely believing in a god that is separate,
is going to cause more problems.
 
BrianHorlicks

BrianHorlicks

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the problem i think, is your either a believer or your not. ive no doubt for many reasons religion can help with MH. but you cant make yourself believe.
The only thing people should believe in is their self.
 
Per Ardua Ad Astra

Per Ardua Ad Astra

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I'm not a believer or a follower of any religion anymore, though I was brought up as an Anglican (Church of England) Christian. I used to serve on the altar, considered for many years entering the Ordained Ministry, and studied religion all the time I was at school, and it was half of my degree at uni. I was in a faculty of theology :)

Some people would argue, that religion can have a detrimental effect on people's emotional and mental health: potentially frightening concepts and beliefs, very strict and ascetic morality that can run contrary to people's, say sexual identity - think of some LGBT people's experiences....

However, this has more to do with how people interpret beliefs, and then how they apply them to others, perhaps without due thought and consideration. It's not necessarily a problem intrinsic in religion itself.

I tend to think that a quiet spirituality can be quite a wonderful thing, and religious, social fellowship can be pretty cool.

I have had an interest in the Indian religions too. I feel drawn to Hinduism, particularly bhakti yoga, the devotional path. And I like the idea of Buddhism, based on human realization.

I like ideas of Ahimsa (non-violence). I like the pacifist ways of some religious persons, of all faiths. There are Christians known as Memonites (I think, can't quite remember name n spelling) are they are non-violent in every regard.

I also like the Unitarians, the Quakers, and I like the idea of strong bonds of Brotherly and Sisterly solidarity you see in some religious folk.

Also, I think humanism is okay too, cos it can be at its best, human moral consideration and togetherness, put without creeds and formulas.

I might take up a spiritual path at some point, I might not. I'm just posting for purposes of discussion, and working life out, if you know what I mean :)
 
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billym4467

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yes of coarse you should believe in yourself, sadly though on here many probably dont have self be-leaf. is yourself the only thing you should believe in, would probably be a big discussion point. those who believe in god, i am quite jealous of them for having the faith to do that.
 
Per Ardua Ad Astra

Per Ardua Ad Astra

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I loved going to Church. I loved the Eucharist, the hymns, sung creeds, candles, incense...it was amazing. Some of the people were okay too, but some are like meds, a small dose can be enough hehe.

I've tried to get my religious belief back. When I was very unwell in my early 20s I thought I was gonna die, so I was hoping n hoping that there was a god, and I might have a miracle or and afterlife, but no. You cannot force the supernatural belief, it's either present or not.

But you can engage in religious practice, or try spirituality. I think there's probably a form, albeit sectarian in some faiths, or a certain mindset, a way of being and doing, that is not bossy or rigid or authoritarian. A form that allows for freedom of expression, makes room for difference, for reason, for quietness, for peace :)
 
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billym4467

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yes theirs some things that religion teaches that can be used in every day life. i'm sadly an on the fence, i hope and believe theirs more to come, but as theirs so much evil in the world i have to wonder why. if life's a test from god then i thing its a sad one. ive been a god parent 4 times and even though i strongly believe that if there is a god he would never turn an nu-christaned child away, i agreed to be a god parent, but did tell the parents it wasnt for religious reasons that i did it. it was if anything happened to them i would watch over there child.
 
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supergreysmoke

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Religion is healthy unless you are unlucky to be having it used as a excuse to fire bullets at you, or burnt at the stake. I'm OK with some 'spirituality' but organised religion is soul destroying, steals wealth via tithing and a ugly form of brain washing. Like they say with any contract, read the small print.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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I think there are aspects of religion that can be beneficial - community, meditative practice, an outlet for difficult subjects - but it depends on how you approach it. If you partake in fundamentalist dogma, it very quickly becomes a negative and the benefits are largely negated.

Religious and spiritual beliefs also are a double-edged sword in that they provide a framework that includes powerful negative concepts as well as positive ones. A Christian is more likely to believe in demons or possession than an atheist, I think.

But I think the compassion-based practices of some religions are a powerful healing element, if they are correctly followed, Buddhism in particular.
 
BrianHorlicks

BrianHorlicks

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I think there are aspects of religion that can be beneficial - community, meditative practice, an outlet for difficult subjects - but it depends on how you approach it. If you partake in fundamentalist dogma, it very quickly becomes a negative and the benefits are largely negated.

Religious and spiritual beliefs also are a double-edged sword in that they provide a framework that includes powerful negative concepts as well as positive ones. A Christian is more likely to believe in demons or possession than an atheist, I think.

But I think the compassion-based practices of some religions are a powerful healing element, if they are correctly followed, Buddhism in particular.
But,
You are still following someone else's ideals,
How can you find out who you are,
Why you are here,
And the world around you,
If you're following what someoneelse had written,
For all we know,
They could be just making it up,
Leading you on a false path of disbelief,
On the other hand they might not be,
But,
To me it still feels restrictive,
I follow what I know,
What I feel,
To take on everything I can and make my own decisions,
To decide what is right,
And then compare with other people,
I meet on my journey,
And find out what they know,
And take it on board,
And expand my knowledge of this world.
 
B

billym4467

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dont we all follow somebody elses ideals, isnt that just a fact of life we live we learn and we take others ideas on board, decide what we like and what we dont like.
 
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