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The Trip Treatment

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The Trip Treatment - The New Yorker

A long article - But worth a read -

Conclusion -

When I asked Rick Doblin if he worries about another backlash, he suggested that the culture has made much progress since the nineteen-sixties. “That was a very different time,” he said. “People wouldn’t even talk about cancer or death then. Women were tranquillized to give birth; men weren’t allowed in the delivery room. Yoga and meditation were totally weird. Now mindfulness is mainstream and everyone does yoga, and there are birthing centers and hospices all over. We’ve integrated all these things into our culture. And now I think we’re ready to integrate psychedelics.” He also points out that many of the people in charge of our institutions today have personal experience with psychedelics and so feel less threatened by them.

Bossis would like to believe in Doblin’s sunny forecast, and he hopes that “the legacy of this work” will be the routine use of psychedelics in palliative care. But he also thinks that the medical use of psychedelics could easily run into resistance. “This culture has a fear of death, a fear of transcendence, and a fear of the unknown, all of which are embodied in this work.” Psychedelics may be too disruptive for our society and institutions ever to embrace them.

The first time I raised the idea of “the betterment of well people” with Roland Griffiths, he shifted in his chair and chose his words carefully. “Culturally, right now, that’s a dangerous idea to promote,” he said. And yet, as we talked, it became clear that he, too, feels that many of us stand to benefit from these molecules and, even more, from the spiritual experiences they can make available.

“We are all terminal,” Griffiths said. “We’re all dealing with death. This will be far too valuable to limit to sick people.”

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Kerome

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Perhaps. I think there is a long way to go on the subjects of hypnosis and psychedelics in medicine. Definitely some people could find a little brainwashing beneficial, lol. But the establishment has been resisting those influences for years.
 

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Perhaps. I think there is a long way to go on the subjects of hypnosis and psychedelics in medicine. Definitely some people could find a little brainwashing beneficial, lol. But the establishment has been resisting those influences for years.
i think a lot of the opposition to it all is (to generalise) a deeply psycho-phobic culture/society - 'we're' terrified of the Mind (unknown & mysterious) & anything concerning altered/non-ordinary states. Reflected in the fact that anything non-ordinary/abnormal/strange/different has to be labelled as illness, controlled, suppressed & drugged.

People take mind numbing drugs - ones that are allowed/endorsed/popularised suppress/sedate the individual - anything that could be considered in any way entheogenic is seriously curtailed/demonised.
 
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Kerome

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That's quite perceptive. I think you're probably right, although I do think it's more a Western society phenomenon. Certainly indigenous tribes don't have this attitude, witness ayahuasca.

But I'm not sure if most people would know what to do with altered states of consciousness, even if they were made chemically available as commonly as cigs. It takes zen buddhist monks, who are probably the group who most commonly make contact with asc through meditation, a long time to learn to manage and interpret them.

And then there are the risks associated with asc, the so-called "bad trip" which leaves permanent scars, delusions, things that can take years of therapy to clean up. I don't know how common they are, but they do exist.
 
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That's quite perceptive. I think you're probably right, although I do think it's more a Western society phenomenon. Certainly indigenous tribes don't have this attitude, witness ayahuasca.

But I'm not sure if most people would know what to do with altered states of consciousness, even if they were made chemically available as commonly as cigs. It takes zen buddhist monks, who are probably the group who most commonly make contact with asc through meditation, a long time to learn to manage and interpret them.

And then there are the risks associated with asc, the so-called "bad trip" which leaves permanent scars, delusions, things that can take years of therapy to clean up. I don't know how common they are, but they do exist.
Yes, i do think it is primarily a 'Western/modern' phenomena.

i don't think it's a simple or easy subject, & i think it goes into some in depth & complex areas.

To my perspectives it comes back to having approaches & understandings that are more humane, in depth & comprehensive in scope regarding the mind & human experience.
 

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Activist Post: The Elephant in the Room: Silk Road and the War on Drugs

The Silk Road trial has concluded, but why are we here in the first place?

The larger conversation regarding the War on Drugs has been ignored on the whole and the trial has surrounded “Did Ross sell drugs?” instead of “Do we care Ross sold drugs?”.

The war on Drugs after almost a century has only wrecked lives, empowered the police state, and funneled money into a prison industrial complex. This is already common knowledge to many, so why is it missing from the media context of Silk Road’s trial?

America is not ready to end the war on drugs. America still has communities with morals and ethics stemming from the 1950s. The baby boomer generation was force fed stories of crazed men on LSD and violent drug dealing cartel killings through media and school. While both of these things do happen from time to time, their perceived frequency is increased with media.

The boomers and their voting aged offspring are the unknowing force that screams, “think of the children” and “not in my backyard”. Legalizing drugs is seen as condoning the behavior of using drugs and, “sends the wrong message to young people.” Well guess what? Young people have unprecedented access to drugs and drug-related knowledge. Cities and towns are struggling to find budgets to combat the War on Drugs and pay to imprison their citizens.

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