The Schizophrenic Mind

A

Apotheosis

Guest
An OK article -

http://www.newsweek.com/id/153479/page/1

Excerpt -

The first time Chris Coles heard the voice, it spoke to him after midnight. In a gentle tone, it instructed him to meet his friend at a beach cove, right then, and apologize: Chris, the voice told him, had been planning to date the friend's girlfriend. Although Coles was planning no such thing, he did as instructed, arriving at the cove at 2 a.m. It was deserted. He dismissed the incident; imagination, after all, can play tricks in the twilight between waking and dreaming. But the voices kept intruding. Coles saw visions, too. At the beach near his California home, he often saw a profusion of whales and dolphins swimming onto the beach, and a golden Buddha glowing from the bushes by the dunes. "I also had delusions of grandeur," says Coles, now 47. "I felt that I had power over things in nature, influence over the whales and dolphins and waves. I thought I could make things happen magically in the water."

Donna Willey's visions came out of a darker world. She saw "bloody images, cut-up people, dismembered people," she says. Voices, too, began haunting her and, despite medication, still won't stop. "They say terrible things," says Willey, 43. "That what I'm doing is not important. They cuss and yell, trying to get me down, saying I shouldn't have done something that way. They're in my head, and they keep yelling." Even as she talks to a reporter in her office at the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) of Greater Chicago, the demons screech "You shouldn't say that," or "Don't say it that way." "The noise, the chaos in my head--it's hard to keep everything separate," she says.

The disease that came to be termed schizophrenia was first described by German psychiatrist Emil Kraepelin in the 1890s, but it remains one of the most tragic and mysterious of mental illnesses. Whether it brings the voices of heaven or of hell, it causes what must surely be the worst affliction a sentient, conscious being can suffer: the inability to tell what is real from what is imaginary. To the person with schizophrenia the voices and visions sound and look as authentic as the announcer on the radio and the furniture in the room. Some 2.5 million Americans have the disease, which transcends economic status, education, geography and even the loving kindness of family. Neither doctors nor scientists can accurately predict who will become schizophrenic. The cause is largely unknown. Although the disease almost surely arises from neurons that take a wrong turn during fetal development, it strikes people just on the cusp of adulthood. Whatever the cause, it seems not to change in frequency: the incidence of schizophrenia has remained at about 1 percent of the population for all the decades doctors have surveyed it. There is surely a genetic predisposition, but not an omnipotent one: when one identical twin has schizophrenia, his or her twin has the disease in fewer than half the cases. Treatment is improving, but a cure is not even on the horizon.
 
M

maudikie

Guest
Apotheosis

:)Excellent artice. But it needs the rest of the population to be tolerant and understand it. How do yo get the message through?:)
 
T

Twylight

Guest
:)Excellent artice. But it needs the rest of the population to be tolerant and understand it. How do yo get the message through?:)
I think the message could get through via Television

A couple of years ago there was a sit com about a psychiatric community - I think it was called Jerusalem and jam ?
It starred Dawn French and Joana Lumley and focused on the interaction of patients and their day to day activities
 
Rambuie Perspecador

Rambuie Perspecador

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Trouble with homing in on the mind, is that it has a body trailing behind it. Brain laterality is all to do with the mind working for and with other parts of the body. Mess with receptors with medication, for instance, and you are knocking out the functioning of an organism - you - that should be taken as a Whole. We should not have to relearn our functioning just because some quack insists we take anti-psychotics! Therefore miminimise medication and maximise natural activity and functioning.

I also argue that voices are not the complete story with schizophrenia, that schizophrenia is not all-antagonistic to our functioning, and with all things, small doses of anything can maintain balances which do not become all-pervasive in moderation. therefore fantasise in moderation, develop powers of abandonment as well as concentration, and re-introduce variety and diversity into your day. Too much of anything is a bad thing, including dwelling on unhealthy predicaments, which become yours through obsession, but aren't yours when you act naturally and not trapped within yourself. End of sermon. Over to Jesus...:innocent:
 
M

maudikie

Guest
I agree that medication should be minimal, but is still necessary to maintain rational thought and behaviour. Just as a splint is needed for a broken leg. f the illness resents with violence the it is only fair to both patient and carers and public tomake the illness bearable to all. Maybe some would benefit from a punch ball.:unsure:
 
Rambuie Perspecador

Rambuie Perspecador

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Careful! That's a bit like living in a padded cell wherever you go! But then what you are saying is valid. I think that being shut away in a hospital is thoroughly unnatural, and gives no scope for physical activity that is necessary for your body to function in a balanced way - like taking a walk, getting a sweat on, etc. Slowly but surely, the hospital regime screws you up. You need a sabbatical from the regime to make it at all bearable.
 

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