The medicalization of "ups and downs": The marketing of the new bipolar disorder

F

fidget

Guest
The medicalization of "ups and downs": The marketing of the new bipolar disorder

"The concept of bipolar disorder has undergone a transformation over the last two decades. Once considered a rare and serious mental disorder, bipolar disorder is being diagnosed with increasing frequency in Europe and North America, and is suggested to replace many other diagnoses. The current article shows how the modern concept of bipolar disorder has been created in the course of efforts to market new antipsychotics and other drugs for bipolar disorder, to enable these drugs to migrate out of the arena of serious mental disorder and into the more profitable realm of everyday emotional problems. A new and flexible notion of the condition has been created that bears little resemblance to the classical condition, and that can easily be applied to ordinary variations in temperament."

The medicalization of "ups and downs": The marketing of the new bipolar disorder
 
F

fidget

Guest
"The expansion of bipolar disorder, like depression before it, medicalises personal and social difficulties, and profoundly affects the way people in Western nations conceive of what it means to be human."
 
cpuusage

cpuusage

ACCOUNT CLOSED
Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
37,660
Location
Planet Lunatic Asylum
All very true. The majority won't see it though, you have difficulties, you go to the Doctor, what the Doc says is Gospel, you can't compare severity of illness/problems, & people love their labels & drugs - perfect for big pharma profits, social control & ignoring & denying the real issues. It's sad. i posted this type of observation 12 years ago on-line, was set upon & attacked for it - Label & Drug everyone up, there's No stopping it.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
17,156
they want us alive, unwell, and addicted to Big Pharma.

I mean, theres a thread on here asking if 2 ADs are enough for SAD.

NO ANTIDEPRESSANT is designed for SAD!!!! :(

a walk would do more good.
 
F

fidget

Guest
it is interesting reading for anyone but i would particularly recommend those with a bipolar II diagnosis to read the paper
 
T

Topcat

Guest
To be honest, I'm embarrassed to say I've been diagnosed with bipolar.
It seems ridiculous, like the article says, it's a serious condition where you end up in hospital having lost the plot.
And the claim the medication doesn't work, and causes problems, that's why I never wanted anything. I was given antidepressants, they were a nightmare.

But.... I don't know what else to do?
I've got this diagnosis, I don't know what else to do. I've had recurring cyclical depression for all my adult life (which I managed for years with various self help). And other recurring irrational 'symptoms' for at least 10yrs that I remember. Everything became worse following extreme upset and stress (I struggle with stress/adrenaline), and antidepressants.

I didn't take meds properly until April this year, because although in my depressions I had thought twisted thoughts and planned how and where I would kill myself, this year I had taken steps towards realising that I could. And where depression started off as lasting 2/3 weeks every four months, it is now lasting for months, with brief respite where the world and I were awesome, and ending up back in that hole maybe a couple of months later.

But I've never been in hospital.
I've functioned.
I'm not seriously ill.
I don't like the label, or the treatment, or any of it. I don't think it's me. But I'm so fucking confused, I have no idea what else to do other than this pharmaceutical break I'm on.

Reading these articles makes me feel like more of a fake and a fraud, and more pathetic and weak than I do every day by myself.
 
F

fidget

Guest
I don't for a second think you have any reason to feel like a fake or a fraud. It is the medical professions failing not yours Topcat. From what you post on here, your life sounds STRESSFUL. It is no wonder you have had to turn to the doctors for support and help with your problems, which sound both serious and real. I'm sorry the post made you feel invalidated, I don't think the argument is that unless you have severe bipolar you should receive no treatment, it is that the treatment that is dolled out to people is entirely inappropriate and is being dictated by big pharma rather than working with individuals to find ways to alleviate some of their suffering. From an outside perspective you are not pathetic and weak at all, you work really hard and consistently try to keep things manageable despite adverse life conditions, overwhelming emotions and bugger all support.
 
F

fidget

Guest
i think a lot of my worry around it all is that we seem to be moving to a position with some that unless their problems are pathologised, they feel they are not valid, which is an unhelpful splitting i think of human experience. The flip side of it is also that without being pathologised the meagre support that is available is not accessible. Apart from maybe these newer IAPT schemes, which seem inadequate and too rigid to effectively deal with peoples individual and complex issues
 
F

fidget

Guest
as someone pathologised with a severe mental illness who has spent fair chunks of their adult life on psych wards I would prefer the whole conversation to move away from pathology at all. I think my psychoses make sense as human processes/responses to untellable social positions, experiences which pushed enough anyone could have but which i happen to be highly sensitive too. I think they make sense on the continuum of human experiences and it would be more useful if "normality" was expanded rather than "illness" being expanded. That isn't to say I don't think mental health services should exist, i think people generally need more support than they get currently but i think that support should be social and emotional not primarily drug based
 
F

fidget

Guest
i meant to write "untenable social positions" there but i guess untellable makes more sense in a way
 
cpuusage

cpuusage

ACCOUNT CLOSED
Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
37,660
Location
Planet Lunatic Asylum
Applies as much to any psychological/emotional crisis -

"Although out reach and crisis services are needed, without a 24/7 front end system sanctuary like Soteria, CooperRiis, Diabasis House, the Open Dialogue or the sanctuary - folks don't have a chance to avoid having their potentially transformative psychosis being aborted with medications and a Schizophrenic diagnosis being laid on them for the rest of their lives. Loren Mosher on alternative approaches to psychosis, was agreed that all the sanctuaries like Laing's Kingsley Hall, John Weir Perry's Diabasis House, Soteria, Burch House, Windhorse, the Agnews Project. And the med free, no restraints, no diagnosis, open door Ward sanctuary; plus the Euorpean and Scandanavian Open Dialogue places- well they ALL basically do the same thing. They provide the necessary and sufficient conditions for a person to go through a psychotic process and come out the other side-'Weller than well'- as Karl Menninger famously said. By being held in the healing crucible of a caring, open hearted setting, the psyche naturally sets it's own course and heals from the early wounds that made a dramatic psychosis renewal necessary in the first place. If instead, a person is labelled as having a diseased brain and medicated into emotional numbness and submission, then the energy and power and symbolic expression of the purposive psychosis simply falls back into the unconscious. Then whenever a loss or trauma happens, the person de-compensates into an ever more amorphous emotional and fragmented daze of so-called chronic psychosis where renewal and healing is far more difficult."
____________________________________________

“I have now, after long practical experience, come to hold the view that the psychogenic causation of the disease is more probable than the toxic [physico-chemical] causation. There are a number of mild and ephemeral but manifestly schizophrenic illnesses - quite apart from the even more common latent psychoses - which begin purely psychogenically, run an equally psychological course (aside from certain presumably toxic nuances) and can be completely cured by a purely psychotherapeutic procedure. I have seen this even in severe cases”.

- Carl Jung

____________________________________________

"Those people who, through their expression of pain or confusion, fall into the arms of the 'helping professions', perhaps becoming psychiatrically diagnosed as psychotic or neurotic or 'inadequate personalities', have in my experience almost all arrived at their predicament through an entirely comprehensible, rational and (of course with hindsight) predictable process.

If you run over a pea with a steam roller you don't blame the pea for what happens to it, nor, sensibly, do you treat its injuries as some kind of shortcoming inherent in its internal structure, whether inherited or acquired.

Similarly, if you place the (literally) unimaginably sensitive organisms which human babies are in the kind of social and environmental machinery which we seem bent on 'perfecting', it can be no real surprise that so many of them end up, as adults, as lost, bemused, miserable and crazy as they do.

The only surprise, perhaps, is that so many pass as 'normal',"

David Smail
Taking Care

______________________________________

The truly insane thing, is that there is No definitive basis/evidence/proof to biomedical psychiatry.
 
cpuusage

cpuusage

ACCOUNT CLOSED
Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
37,660
Location
Planet Lunatic Asylum
To be honest, I'm embarrassed to say I've been diagnosed with bipolar.
It seems ridiculous, like the article says, it's a serious condition where you end up in hospital having lost the plot.
And the claim the medication doesn't work, and causes problems, that's why I never wanted anything. I was given antidepressants, they were a nightmare.
You always remind me of a case study in the book -

'Users and abusers of psychiatry: a critical look at psychiatric practice' - By Lucy Johnstone

It's well worth a read -

Review of Johnstone L (2000) Users and abusers of psychiatry
 
cpuusage

cpuusage

ACCOUNT CLOSED
Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
37,660
Location
Planet Lunatic Asylum
“I have now, after long practical experience, come to hold the view that the psychogenic causation of the disease is more probable than the toxic [physico-chemical] causation. There are a number of mild and ephemeral but manifestly schizophrenic illnesses - quite apart from the even more common latent psychoses - which begin purely psychogenically, run an equally psychological course (aside from certain presumably toxic nuances) and can be completely cured by a purely psychotherapeutic procedure. I have seen this even in severe cases”.

- Carl Jung
The life conclusion of arguably the greatest psychiatrist/psychologist who has ever lived, was that what is considered in the mainstream to be the most biological of 'functional' mental disorders, was in fact primarily psychogenic. That says something profound (imo).
 
calypso

calypso

Well-known member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jan 5, 2011
Messages
42,163
Location
Lancashire
it is interesting reading for anyone but i would particularly recommend those with a bipolar II diagnosis to read the paper
I have a diagnosis of bipolar ll and take a little exception to the implication that I am not dealing with a severe illness. Whilst some might not be in the new diagnosis criteria, I have ended up on ICU for 10 days following a severe OD and near death and had several admissions to hospital amongst other serious attempts on my life. Also serious self harm with depression and hallucinations and delusions. Add to that being picked up by the police for a serious manic episode I think you should think before assuming that BP2 isn't a valid diagnosis.
 
Last edited:
F

fidget

Guest
oh for fucks sake, did you read any of my following posts? I wasn't saying that people diagnosed bipolar II don't have serious problems, just that it's most interesting for them to read about the development of the diagnosis and the treatment approach to it.
 
F

fidget

Guest
it is interesting because the diagnosis was made to follow the drugs

I wasn't denying anybodies suffering but psychiatric categories are not neutral descriptions of disease processes
 
F

fidget

Guest
Calypso, I'm sorry, I'm sorry the post made you feel I was invalidating your experiences. That is not my aim, nor I think the aim of the paper
 
F

firemonkee57

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Messages
8,215
I think there will always be a debate as to where the boundary between good and bad mental health lies. Some take a liberal stance while others take a more conservative stance.
For me it's about distress and/or level of dysfunction and how best to improve on that. I think there are those pro the medical model and anti it who fail to see that there is no one size fits all solution.

The question is how to accommodate the need for a person centred approach within a system of finite funding and resources?
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Azelka Bipolar Forum 7

Similar threads


Top