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The Legacy of R. D. Laing An appraisal of his contemporary relevance

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The Legacy of R. D. Laing: An appraisal of his contemporary relevance (Paperback) - Routledge

The name R. D. Laing continues to be widely recognized by those in the psychotherapy community in the United States and Europe. Laing’s books are a testament to his breadth of interests, including the understanding of madness, alternatives to conventional psychiatric treatment, existential philosophy and therapy, family systems, cybernetics, mysticism, and poetry. He is most remembered for his devastating critique of psychiatric practices, his controversial rejection of the concept of ‘mental illness,’ and his groundbreaking center for people in acute mental distress at Kingsley Hall, London.

Most of the books that have been published about Laing have been written by people who did not know him personally and were unfamiliar with Laing the man and teacher. The Legacy of R. D. Laing: An appraisal of his contemporary relevance is composed by thinkers and practitioners who knew Laing intimately, some of whom worked with Laing. This collection of papers brings a perspective and balance to Laing’s controversial ideas, some of which were never addressed in his books. There has never been a collection of papers that address so thoroughly the question of who Laing was and why he became the most famous psychiatrist in the world.

As M. Guy Thompson’s collection illustrates, there are now a number of alternatives to psychiatry throughout the world, and much of this can be credited to Laing’s influence. The Legacy of R. D. Laing will ensure the reader has a keen grasp of who Laing was, what it was like to be his patient or his friend, and why his thinking was far ahead of its time, even in the radical era of the 1970s. It is timely to appraise the nature of his contribution and bring Laing back into contemporary conversations about the nature of sanity and madness, and more humane approaches to helping those in profound mental distress. This book offers an in-depth insight into the work of R.D. Laing. It will be a must read for psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, family therapists, psychiatrists and academics alike.

M. Guy Thompson, PhD is a Personal and Supervising Analyst at the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California and Chairman of Free Association, Inc., a non-profit organization devoted to the dissemination of Laing’s ideas, in San Francisco. Dr. Thompson received his psychoanalytic training from R. D. Laing and associates at the Philadelphia Association and is the author of numerous books and journal articles on psychoanalysis, phenomenology, and schizophrenia. He currently lives in San Rafael, California.
 
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Haley

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Thank you for this book. I have been wondering and wondering if neurofeedback would get a brain back to square one so to speak, so that when one stops medications it isn't an automatic disaster of anxiety and insomnia. It seems to me that people get on the medication merry go round and then can never get off. Of course, no insurance will pay for expensive neurofeedback.
I will go to the library and look for this book.
 
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ramboghettouk

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i don't think laing had anything to do with neurofeedback, it'd probably be too biology orientated for him

when i first broke down, my parents went to see a turor at uni the 70s my dad said he's right we've only got ourselves to blame, laing i blame for giving that tutor the ammo to press the catholic guilt switch, the national schitzoprenic fellowship was created as an answer to laing my parents joined, didn't help my recovery journey, though maybe nothing would have

laing blames family but you should try to live with a schitzoprenia label without family, most of laings old boys are getting they're pension now
 
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ramboghettouk

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Does he?

Do you not see any way that familial dynamics effects mental health/prognosis?
i can see it can be very difficult for family to handle a mental health diagnosis as a lot of the information about mental illlness is covered up, thats different from saying family cause mental illness
 
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Laing did say that Schizophreniform parents could induce apparent psychosis in a child. But he didn't say it was the same for all psychosis. In one book (Family something), all his subjects quoted were women, which I think is interesting.

I saw him on stage at Oxford University once - (I got in through the toilet window! I was studying psychology and couldn't miss the opportunity) - and his accent was very strong so had to really concentrate to understand him. I don't remember much, but I do remember him saying that schizophrenia was part environment and part brain. But he did assert that some people might be vulnerable, but that vulnerability wasn't always triggered in some families. Then he did a lot of his poems, which I found harder to follow than his accent.

I read most of his books, and found them fascinating, but sometimes a little simplistic. Just my opinion of course.
 
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ramboghettouk

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What about people who are abused?
not everyone is abused though there was a time when everyone had been sexually abused as an alternative to a schitzo diagnosis

Laing whatever else cameron expects family to care for people don't i know it

Asked the last shrink who sould be caring for me is it family or is it social services or should i be caring for myself she said who do you think should be caring for you i said i'm asking you as one friend said it's then she closed my case
 
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