The issue of consent

H

heisenberg

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Messages
156
#1
Hi all,

Does anyone know the general rule when it comes to 'psychologists' and 'psychotherapists' sharing personal and confidential information between each other?

It seems I have had very sensitive and confidential information happily exchanged between these people without my explicit consent.

If anyone know more about this, please share.

Many thanks in advance.
 
Wiseowl

Wiseowl

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Joined
Mar 13, 2011
Messages
8,423
#2
Sharing of confidential information within agencies and organisations like the NHS would come under the Data Protection Act 1998. The link below might be of help.

Patient confidentiality | Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust

I believe that a team of health professionals involved in your care would be allowed to share information with due reason.

If you look on your NHS trust website they normally have a copy of their data protection policy. There should also be a complaints procedure document should feel you have grounds for a complaint.
 
R

rosesinthehospital

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Joined
Jul 23, 2013
Messages
60
#3
I believe it is all down to the issue of percieved risk to yourself or others. If they believe you might hurt yourself or someone else, and sharing the disclosure may prevent that, then they can share with other professionals.
 
H

heisenberg

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Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Messages
156
#4
Thanks guys.

I suspect that they will try play the 'risk' card so to speak. I am currently having a complaint addressed relating to this.

The issue relates to a criminal investigation which was promptly thrown out of court due to the extremely poor and shoddy evidence.

There was a psychiatrist/psychotherapist who gave evidence on my behalf who was pretty aware of the charges and details thereof as I had met with him to discuss in some detail.

After the case was thrown out, I told the above party about this however I suspect he will argue he did not believe me.

It now appears he is bad mouthing me to other parties and in doing so subjecting me to prejudice.
 
R

rosesinthehospital

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Jul 23, 2013
Messages
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#5
I have just realised I assumed you were British.
Also, if you are check the NICE guidelines for your diagnosis. In your letter there may be something you can quote to show them they are not following what they should be. For example I have BDP and the NICE guidelines talk about the importance of an open and honest relationship and trust. xx
 
H

heisenberg

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Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Messages
156
#6
I have just realised I assumed you were British.
Also, if you are check the NICE guidelines for your diagnosis. In your letter there may be something you can quote to show them they are not following what they should be. For example I have BDP and the NICE guidelines talk about the importance of an open and honest relationship and trust. xx
I am British and resident in the UK.

Diagnosis is depression and a personality disorder (whatever the hell that is).

Never heard of NICE before so will check that out.
 
J

jacobjh

Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2014
Messages
6
#8
Sharing of confidential information within agencies and organisations like the NHS would come under the Data Protection Act 1998. The link below might be of help.


I believe that a team of health professionals involved in your care would be allowed to share information with due reason.

If you look on your NHS trust website they normally have a copy of their data protection policy. There should also be a complaints procedure document should feel you have grounds for a complaint.
I think you get your answer what you looking for.