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The drugs and driving debate

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trainwreck

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ok , into the fire i go again ,how many of us drive on prescribed MED,S,Yes about 99 percent who own a car,now i think soon they will take our driving liecence away, think about it, what makes us better thad drink drivers.i no meds effect me at the wheel so if you say to me they dont you, i wont believe you,, the cops reconise now the percent of people with illegal an legal meds that drive, and even if you may not think your a danger to yourself an the public you are simple as that.so if they pull you sometime in the future an you say i had 10mg of valium today they may ban you.an dont say i drive slower an make sure im more aware because that mak,s you a worse driver, more relaxed than normal make you a worse driver you take more chances,but we need to drive so we do, an we continue to run the gauntlet
 
S

saffron

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its a fact, but sometimes unavoidable for people who rely on cars for a near normal life, ie work, shopping etc. illegal drugs is different because you are not entirely sure what they are cut with so cannot have a clue on the effective results. Its really hard to get a drug that will help all round, I am pretty luck in getting one that allows me to continue to drive and I can have a drink on them..
Driving whilst on illegal drugs just if not worse than drink driving because there are a lot more measures and choice involved to take care not too. once you are prescribed something the choice to take it or not decreases.
as for the solution to having to drive on meds, i really would not know where to start. other than trying to get the best drug to suit your lifestyle and your problems.
S
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
Drink driving is about the worst. I'd rather get in a car with someone who was stoned on pot; than someone on psychiatric meds.

Most people don't drive very well anyway. How many people are driving around with serious health conditions?

I know a guy with type 1 diabetes; is on handfuls of tablets a day, insulin injections, can't see properly, has the reactions of a slug; has had both his legs amputated; has had strokes & stomach cancer, & up until recently was driving a car! He is in hospital at the moment recovering from an operation; & the consultant has been trying to boost his mood by telling him he'll get him rehabilitated & back behind the wheel of a (disabled) car soon. This guy is a mason, Doctors are all in their own branch of the masons; I think that has a lot to do with it. & people in this state of health get allowed on the road? It's no wonder people are killed on Britain's roads.
 
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R

ramboghettouk

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I thought of getting rid of the moped,, but would have to show a valid cbt if i changed my mind and bought a new moped, i doubt i'd pass the eyesight test, they say 50% of those over 40 would fail.

Maybe i shouldn't ride it on these drugs, i don't mostly just to the supermarket and back occasionally

After spending money on the gear, it's hard just to waste it
 
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Apotheosis

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Is this the Kind of thing you do on your Moped Rambo?

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ramboghettouk

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Couldn't handle it on my meds. it's all i can do to drive in a straight line, if anything gets in the way i classify it as a hallucination.
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
Couldn't handle it on my meds. it's all i can do to drive in a straight line, if anything gets in the way i classify it as a hallucination.
Best way; if there is anything in the road do you speed up, beeping the horn, while shouting? That works quite well too.

:)
 
daffy

daffy

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If you take your meds responsibly and follow the guidlines of getting used to the meds b4 you start driving again. Wenever you change meds they can make you drowsy or more agitated which neither are good for driving, but normally within a couple of weeks you should know yourself whether you are safe to be on the road.

Your Pdoc will tell you normally not to drive if they think you will be affected. Mine did and ignored her and twice i have knocked wing mirrors off cars due to my spacial awareness. After paying for them to be repaired, whe she says dont drive for 2 weeks now i dont
 
daffy

daffy

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.

I know a guy with type 1 diabetes; is on handfuls of tablets a day, insulin injections, can't see properly, has the reactions of a slug; has had both his legs amputated QUOTE]

Im also diabetic but T2 I was only dx last year, but had to inform my insurers and the DVLA. I was told it was a notyfiable illness but T2 was okay as long as you didnt inject (which the majority of T2 dont, but need medication). However T1 has to be noted with the DVLA and your insurers. You are supposed to check your BG every time b4 driving as your glucose levels can change very quickly. If you are T1 and have 2 hypos in one year that need hospitalisation then you can have your licence taken from you for 12 months. And if you have not informed the DVLA it is illegal and your insurance is invalid.
 
T

TheFinalShowdown

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The fear of an accident is sometimes the cause of it.
 
pentagram

pentagram

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Regards diabetes, and other health problems and driving. ALL the facts are on the government website for people to check what they need to do.

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/DriverLicensing/MedicalRulesForDrivers/MedicalA-Z/DG_187349

Diabetes on diet and driving Diabetes on diet is a condition that you may need to tell the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) about. Telling DVLA will depend on what type of driving licence you hold. Find out if you need to tell DVLA about your condition.
Car or motorcycle driving licence holders
If you hold a car or motorcycle driving licence - you will not need to tell DVLA about your medical condition.


Diabetes on tablets and driving Diabetes on tablets is a condition that you may need to tell the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) about.
Car or motorcycle driving licence holders
If you hold a car or motorcycle driving licence - you will not need to tell DVLA about your medical condition


Diabetes on insulin Diabetes on insulin is a condition that you need to tell the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) about. Find out which questionnaire you need to complete for the driving licence you hold.
Car or motorcycle driving licence holders

To tell DVLA please download the medical questionnaire 'DIAB1' and send it to DVLA.


I have had T2 diabetes for a year and am determined to keep it under control, so I stick to my diet so I am not on any pills yet. Therefore there is no need to tell DVLA or insurers.
 
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pentagram

pentagram

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Depression and driving Depression is a condition that you need to tell the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) about. Telling DVLA will depend on whether your condition affects your ability to drive safely.

Car or motorcycle driving licence holders Depression - does not affect your driving

If depression does not affect your driving - you do not need to tell DVLA.

Depression - affects your driving If depression does affect your driving - you will need to tell DVLA.

Unsure whether depression affects your driving

If you are unsure whether depression affects your driving - you will need to check with your doctor or consultant who will be able to advise you.
 
M

mckie

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My son was given permission to drive by his doctor many years ago. I occasionally go with him and think he is a good driver. He has only had one accident and that was smeone driving into him when he was parked in a car park! I saw a little time ago that the Government were thinking of changing the limit to 80 m.p.h. I think that is mad. Life is too fast for everyone today except in emergency. I think that all the conferences that people have should be on line. Perhaps following a first one when a face to face meeting is desirable.
 
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Violets

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i drive and take meds on/off - it says on my medication 'if affected do not drive' and i havent noticed anything that has affected my driving.
 
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takeholdofthedream

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Other than threats from the psych of taking my licence away, I dont get much trouble. I ride motorcycles (full licence) and am now learning to drive a car too in about an hour and a half, Although my medication is rather potent the the sedative department it goes one of 3 ways. Learn to adapt to its effect, dont take it or you can request medication less sedative effects or do as I do which will remain classified. To be honest the driving while mentally ill rule is a chance game, my friend who has just depression not that bad was refused as she had SH'd a couple of times where as my idiot step father drug/drink addict 10x more braindead than ozzy and 50x as stupid is allowed to drive without any problems, go figure.
 
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