• Welcome! It’s great to see you.

    If you'd like to talk with people who know what it's like

    Our forum members are people, maybe like yourself, who experience mental health difficulties or who have had them at some point in their life.

The dark underbelly of 'antipsychotics'

A

Apotheosis

Guest
Many non-medical personnel are making decisions related to the use of psychiatric drugs for children and adults. These may be poorly informed about these substances and may be alarmed by the negative outcomes they see daily in their client base.

Straight answers to simple questions on this subject are incredibly hard to come by.

It has been estimated that 69 cents out of each dollar spent on antipsychotic medications in the U.S. comes from the taxpayers pocket. A new federally financed drug research reveals a stark disparity: children in the public system are given powerful antipsychotic medicines at a rate four times higher than children whose parents have private insurance. And the Medicaid children are more likely to receive the drugs for less severe conditions than their middle-class counterparts.

While the use of these dangerous medications in children is grossly repugnant, a look at the prescribing practices in adults within this system defies reason. Two, three, and even more different antipsychotics, each in maximally allowable doses, are prescribed to many of these patients. This is all top shelf stuff, some costing the the taxpayer the better part of $1,000 a month for each individual prescription.

So if the findings of maxi-doses of multiple same-class products to the same person is correct, the drug bills for many individuals in this system can easily range upwards of $50,000/year for individual clients, even at government pricing. Adding to this drain on the public coffers is the cost of unnecessary treatment-caused hospitalizations, the ancillary treatment to relieve iatrogenics, and the many other problems these medications cause.

The human cost in terms of productive lives lost and quality of life is incalculable.

The question here is:

* Are these prescribing practices effective or are these just making the problem worse?
* Can be medications of this magnitude be justified as medical necessity?
* So, what are the outcomes? Morbidity and the death rates associated with psychoactive products is outrageous.

From a major NIMH-funded survey, these individuals will die 25 to 30 years before their peers* in the general population. They will suffer and die from many treatment-related conditions. For the full report click here.*

* As alarming as these numbers are, today’s real-world numbers might be far worse. This paper was published in 2006. The data used in this study was from years prior to 2000. The use of psychotropics have increased exponentially in the more than ten years since the data was compiled for this paper. Before the ’90s, the mortality deficit was the then-alarming ten years of shorter life expectancy.
 
darren

darren

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2008
Messages
49
Location
uk
In the context of mental disorders, the premisses regarding the use of antipsychotic drugs differ broadly. Prescribing doctors need to be aware that their mentally ill patients are likely to be confronted with extremely negative public attitudes towards antipsychotic medication. Doctors should anticipate the most relevant prejudices and address them explicitely.
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
In the context of mental disorders, the premisses regarding the use of antipsychotic drugs differ broadly. Prescribing doctors need to be aware that their mentally ill patients are likely to be confronted with extremely negative public attitudes towards antipsychotic medication. Doctors should anticipate the most relevant prejudices and address them explicitely.
What of facts?
 
darren

darren

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2008
Messages
49
Location
uk
What of facts?


The vast majority of antipsychotics work by blocking the absorption of dopamine, a chemical that occurs naturally in the brain and is responsible for causing psychotic reactions, especially those that happen as a result of mental illness. Dopamine is one of the substances in the brain responsible for transmitting messages across the gaps, or synapses, of nerve cells. Too much dopamine in a person's brain speeds up nerve impulses to the point of causing hallucinations, delusions, and thought disorders. By blocking the dopamine receptors, antipsychotics reduce the severity of these symptoms. The brain has several types of dopamine receptors, and their unselective blockage by antipsychotic drugs causes the side effects.

When a patient takes an antipsychotic drug, he or she enters what is called a neuroleptic state. Impulsiveness and aggression decrease as do concern and arousal about events going on in the environment outside the person. The person taking the drug has fewer hallucinations and delusions as well. Once these symptoms are controlled by antipsychotic drugs, he or she can live a more normal life, and physicians can more easily treat the cause of the psychosis.



Read more: Antipsychotic Drugs http://science.jrank.org/pages/443/Antipsychotic-Drugs.html#ixzz0oodzubR4
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
The vast majority of antipsychotics work by blocking the absorption of dopamine, a chemical that occurs naturally in the brain and is responsible for causing psychotic reactions,
No proof of that Darren. The dopamine hypothesis in relation to schizophrenia has been proved incorrect.

The person taking the drug has fewer hallucinations and delusions as well. Once these symptoms are controlled by antipsychotic drugs, he or she can live a more normal life, and physicians can more easily treat the cause of the psychosis.
No proof of that either.

The facts that I was referring to is people dying 25-30 years earlier than everyone else once prescribed this class of drug. The highly debilitating side effects that severely reduce quality of life, & the highly over prescribed nature of these drugs; in opposition to far more effective & proven method's of treatment, & support.
 
R

ramboghettouk

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2008
Messages
17,191
Location
london
To some extent i can agree with psychotherapy as an alternative to meds, even a better alternative, what annoys me is when you encourage people to come off meds without support, i know you deny that but your constantly posting anti med arguments that will encourage people to come off meds without support

Maybe meds aren't perfect by any means but people who self medicate on alcohol are damaging themselves and those around them more

I don't agree with forcing meds on people, though when someone is behaving in a way that compromises the happiness of those around them and when those around are vulnerable themselves there is an argument, people do not have the right to come off meds and behave in any antisocial way that effects those around them, those around them have rights as well

I stand by what i say, when what i say is cut and pasted it is not what i said
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
To some extent i can agree with psychotherapy as an alternative to meds, even a better alternative,
It's taken years to get such acknowledgement out of you; it would be better if most people acknowledged such things.

what annoys me is when you encourage people to come off meds without support,
Nope - never done that.

i know you deny that but your constantly posting anti med arguments that will encourage people to come off meds without support
What about all the people arguing that people must take meds & telling people to take meds??? That's OK is it?

Maybe meds aren't perfect by any means but people who self medicate on alcohol are damaging themselves and those around them more
2 separate issues to my understanding.

I don't agree with forcing meds on people, though when someone is behaving in a way that compromises the happiness of those around them and when those around are vulnerable themselves there is an argument, people do not have the right to come off meds and behave in any antisocial way that effects those around them, those around them have rights as well
We have laws, & a psychiatric system ect ect ect - That enforce such things - What's so wrong with it all? If drugging people as a matter of policy & treating people as they are treated under the current system is 'correct' procedure - then why all the moaning? Why all the problems?

I stand by what i say, when what i say is cut and pasted it is not what i said
Good for you, I stand by what I say too. I have never edited any of your posts.
 
S

starfish

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 15, 2009
Messages
655
Location
country cottage
cut and paste

well said rambo. i ran out of my meds last week and have gone a bit manic.
 
R

ramboghettouk

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2008
Messages
17,191
Location
london
Seems a certain person has cut and pasted my words taken them totally out of context then argued against them as usual

If i could handle the computer classes i could do the same i guess
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
i ran out of my meds last week and have gone a bit manic.
If being drugged is so important - then why have you run out of them; & risking your mental health messing around with medication?
 
R

ramboghettouk

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2008
Messages
17,191
Location
london
Take a computer class the cheap ones are overcrowded, i can't handle them with my social anxiety and the better ones are too expensive

You'll probably make a point about the drugs not working which is true but they're working well enough to prevent the extremes of behaviour

Maybe you think if you argue the psychotherapists position enough one will offer you free psychotherapy, let me tell you they're only interested in those who can pay a fortune up front
 
A

Apotheosis

Guest
Take a computer class the cheap ones are overcrowded, i can't handle them with my social anxiety and the better ones are too expensive
You could always teach yourself? I did - or just carry on moaning & doing nothing about it.

You'll probably make a point about the drugs not working which is true but they're working well enough to prevent the extremes of behaviour
If they work so well - then why do the people on the most drugs appear the illest? & how come people on drugs appear so f*cked up & unhappy? The more drugs the more f*cked up & unhappy they appear to be.

If these drugs are so wonderful - then why not just put everyone on them? & make it compulsory to give them to all children as well - like they do in America.

Maybe you think if you argue the psychotherapists position enough one will offer you free psychotherapy, let me tell you they're only interested in those who can pay a fortune up front
Not all of them. I have some things in the pipeline. To be honest; I've learnt in many ways to be my own counsel - there are better methods of recovery as well - don't worry; I'm not gonna throw my pearls to pigs.
 
Last edited:
I

IntrospectionFtw!

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
383
Location
Buried under a sand castle.
tbh I'm more worried about the kemadrin i took about two months ago i'm still feeling the negative effects of it seems to be mimicing dementia.
 
R

ramboghettouk

Well-known member
Founding Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2008
Messages
17,191
Location
london
theres a question you've been avoiding answering so i'll ask it again do pdeople have the right to refuse meds and then behave in a way that impacts negatively on those around them, when if they take meds they would act otherwise?

To quote the voices at outpatients you don't have to be a danger to yourself or society to be annoying the neighbours
 

Similar threads

Top