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  • Safety Notice: This section on Psychiatric Drugs/Medications enables people to share their personal experiences of using such drugs/medications. Always seek the advice of your doctor, psychiatrist or other qualified health professional before making any changes to your medications or with any questions you may have regarding drugs/medications. In considering coming off psychiatric drugs it is very important that you are aware that most psychiatric drugs can cause withdrawal reactions, sometimes including life-threatening emotional and physical withdrawal problems. In short, it is not only dangerous to start taking psychiatric drugs, it can also be dangerous to stop them. Withdrawal from psychiatric drugs should only be done carefully under experienced clinical supervision.

The Dangers of Coming Off Psychiatric Drugs

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la femme folle

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I would too but having come off imipramine for a few months and purely put on an antipsychotic I would say that it would be extremely difficult if not impossible. I switched to clomipramine briefly but they don't even work as they used to when I first too them, only the imipramine can lift the depression and OCD symptoms now (meds wise). My GP had said to me at the time that your brain gets used to a medication very quickly, and it seems I am now stuck with them.

I might try coming off them again, but if I can't function without them I don't want to end up in hospital again. So I'm stuck in an impossible position now. If a doctor had told me that before I went on antidepressants I wouldn't have taken them. I can see how the drugs ruin your level of empathy, and make it hard to feel anything, I can't cry or laugh properly. There is a feeling of being dead inside and that's no way to live. It's emotional flatness and it makes life seem pointless when you cannot experience it as you should.

However sad or angry I get about it though, I can't get too upset because the drugs have made it impossible to do so. It is no wonder, in the present day, with all the injustice around us, that we are encouraged to take psychiatric medication, as it stops us from feeling so impassioned and driven to change things, and no one who does well out of this world wants that. :(
 
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I would too but having come off imipramine for a few months and purely put on an antipsychotic I would say that it would be extremely difficult if not impossible. I switched to clomipramine briefly but they don't even work as they used to when I first too them, only the imipramine can lift the depression and OCD symptoms now (meds wise). My GP had said to me at the time that your brain gets used to a medication very quickly, and it seems I am now stuck with them.

I might try coming off them again, but if I can't function without them I don't want to end up in hospital again. So I'm stuck in an impossible position now. If a doctor had told me that before I went on antidepressants I wouldn't have taken them. I can see how the drugs ruin your level of empathy, and make it hard to feel anything, I can't cry or laugh properly. There is a feeling of being dead inside and that's no way to live. It's emotional flatness and it makes life seem pointless when you cannot experience it as you should.

However sad or angry I get about it though, I can't get too upset because the drugs have made it impossible to do so. It is no wonder, in the present day, with all the injustice around us, that we are encouraged to take psychiatric medication, as it stops us from feeling so impassioned and driven to change things, and no one who does well out of this world wants that. :(
Yea. i feel very similar with it all, as you are aware.

Sadly it's the ways this current society / system is, & way that mental health is currently generally treated.

Some 12 years ago i had to come to an acceptance of the diagnosis / condition / medication, as the alternatives to that are far worse in my experience. It is in ways a kind of limbo & Not fully living, how can it be to be permanently drugged on powerful psychoactive / sedative substances.

i'm very tired of trying to fight it all.

What real dent in it all are people like Peter Breggin, Robert Whitaker, Peter C. Gøtzsche, Joanna Moncrieff, David Healy, & many others really making? & i'm Not in a position of influence anything like any of them are. It was the same in the 50's / 60's / 70's etc - it just goes on & on, has done for Centuries. The biomedical; label & drug Model is now totally entrenched, & that's what the majority of society & the system wants - i feel it's a case of accepting that is the way it all is, there's No changing it (imo). Am bored of banging my head into a brick wall around it all, it is wiser to partly drink some of the Kool-Aid, same as the vast majority of the rest of the population.

Of course it's all largely wrong, But what does this society & system fundamentally care..........
 
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la femme folle

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Yea. i feel very similar with it all, as you are aware.

Sadly it's the ways this current society / system is, & way that mental health is currently generally treated.

Some 12 years ago i had to come to an acceptance of the diagnosis / condition / medication, as the alternatives to that are far worse in my experience. It is in ways a kind of limbo & Not fully living, how can it be to be permanently drugged on powerful psychoactive / sedative substances.

i'm very tired of trying to fight it all.

What real dent in it all are people like Peter Breggin, Robert Whitaker, Peter C. Gøtzsche, Joanna Moncrieff, David Healy, & many others really making? & i'm Not in a position of influence anything like any of them are. It was the same in the 50's / 60's / 70's etc - it just goes on & on, has done for Centuries. The biomedical; label & drug Model is now totally entrenched, & that's what the majority of society & the system wants - i feel it's a case of accepting that is the way it all is, there's No changing it (imo). Am bored of banging my head into a brick wall around it all, it is wiser to partly drink some of the Kool-Aid, same as the vast majority of the rest of the population.

Of course it's all largely wrong, But what does this society & system fundamentally care..........
They don't. But I don't think many are really aware of the damage the drugs do. Neither do they question the labels that are applied, unless it comes to claiming benefits, in which case you are deemed just lazy and feckless.

As the article points out, in Scotland prescriptions are free, so it is much easier to just pick up the pills than have therapy. There are very few psychologists in NHS Scotland compared to psychiatrists, only one in my area as far as I know.

This is not seen as an issue by most people. It is only.when they find themselves on a waiting list of over 18 - 24 months for a psychologist that they realise how awful the situation is.

That is not to paint psychologists as perfect because a lot of them are not up to much and don't really help, but it's quite obvious that most people probably don't need to be on high doses of meds for a lifetime.

I think life circumstances including poverty, conflict and childhood adversity etc. are not going away and there is no real attempt to do so. It's a lot easier for the Establishment of any country to back the medical model of mental health problems than it is to admit that the ills caused by their policies and their associated experiences and traumas are to blame for the high rate of emotional distress present in society. So it is no surprise that it has lasted as long as it has, even if a small amount of independent thinking and reading of actual fact based evidence can easily reject it. It is not the fault of anyone who tries to challenge it, the opposing force with which resistance is met is much greater and stronger, especially with such corporate and institutional approval. Governments and pharmaceutical companies have much more influence than those individuals who stand up and tell it like it is. That is not to say that other psychiatrists/mh professionals couldn't do more to change it, because they could, but they are corrupted by drugs firms for a start. They toe the 'party line' just like politicians do.

It's not the fault of the ones who are honest, it's those who are dishonest or ignorant that are to blame for the way things are (in my opinion).
 
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Totally agree with all that & then that's how it is - has been for the past 400 years if you make a study of it all, & really has been the same for 12 thousand years in a broader systemic sense. Can't see it all changing? It would take a Universal Miracle to do so.
 
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la femme folle

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The way this world is it is unlikely to change. There are too many powerful people who want it to stay as it is. The point is you shouldn't feel bad or a failure for trying to fight an out of control monster when it has a much larger army. At least you have the guts to stand up to it and do battle with it, and that is unfortunately more difficult when you have been a psychiatric patient. The odds are stacked against you anyway, but the label applied to you by doctors makes it much harder for you to be listened to, it shouldn't be that way but it is.

I think if one person is motivated by your online posts and fight to raise awareness then it is a success, however small it might seem. Given what you are up against it is an achievement. :hug:
 
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natalie

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Interesting to read at a future date.

To give an outline, without reading, the article at the moment, a few years ago, I wished to have gradually weened off my antipshycotic, and general szchophrenia based health; and it was sworn by the powers that be that I couldn't come off, this was the mental health unit, under them for a revised referral, at the time, back in 2015, and even a bit before that - my GP service, and also mother. All three have been against the idea for me to ween off and stay off the med.

So there we have it, I am stuck happily and at far the best doseage, being on my med, and in fact, we took me off Olanzapine, which never worked, well, tried on something else I couldn't possibly recall the name off now, and that hadn't worked, sufficiently, well the main med head, the medication for it, for side affects, gave me such problems, not until, finally back in Jly 2007, that Abilify had come along, now, I won't swear that it was a powerful drug to begin with - it wasn't , not until much later on , on 25ml, always on occasions, unless anything very acute comes up, works brilliantly around the clock, for 24/7.


The chances are, I'm trying to confirm, that if one a party paitent discharge orotherwise, ever wished to come off, med, don't it's not worth the risk, and one also could very much so, then have once more relapses, and that's nasty implied to go through, both for the sufferer, and carer of. or carers of.


It's about 19 years, i have been on Abilify, and I would highly reccommend this type of med, to anyone whom is planning hopefully not to come off their med, maybe to switch though to something else, and Abilfiy is a proven strong sample, how one can manage mental health on a long term/permanent basis, without any med interruptions, and dose levels.

I was advised, by GP service, I could increase dose up to 30ml, in total, i thouight well, that might give me something much more of a problem I am already awaer of, so I thought nope, I'll stick withwhat I know at 25ml.

Could you all please note that in terms of my sensitivy and paranoia problems, whilst away, just after next week, I plan to take my dose about 2pm, on anfternoon, otherwise we'll be at lunch still, meaning at 3.30/4pm, I'll take, and it is much more helpful for paranoia controlling during the evening, and hearing voices as well, hopefullly well about 3000, the ship holds, and I am still very well on 25ml from 3.30/4pm, the following day hopefully. I can't predict problems which might come up,, and I'll report to here apart from parents as well, even them as well, if i might happen to be well, stuck in a mental health rut, and I might need offloading, points, I'll file, at some point, much later on into the trip, couldn't do that tooe arly on, I can never get my paraphrasing sorted out, when I'm unwell, so expect a filed post report, earlier to the middle of the following week away, or during over the middle weekend away.


Sorry to diagress, I just wanted to point out and stress, that no, one can't come off med, even if one has been on antipshycotic med, for years, don't risk it, it;s not worth the hassle.


Best Regards All,


Natalie.
 
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Sorry to diagress, I just wanted to point out and stress, that no, one can't come off med, even if one has been on antipshycotic med, for years, don't risk it, it;s not worth the hassle.
A percentage of people do get successfully medication free long term, & more fully resolve things.

There is a lot of debate as to the bigger picture regarding best primary treatment approaches & longer term outcomes, between a focus on more comprehensive psychological / social support & minimum / wise / limited use of medication (such as Open Dialogue & associated projects), with the current standard model / treatment.

It is Not a settled debate.

& yes, for some people, once dependent on neuroleptic drugs in a percentage of cases it is likely wiser to stay on them, & certainly be very aware of the potential for severe withdrawal reactions in stopping medication.
 
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la femme folle

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I think it depends how long you've been on the meds and how high the dose is. If you've been on it for 6 months I think you would have much more success than after 6 years. You also have to taper off at a slow pace that suits you. The problem can be that psychiatrists take you off it too quickly, and you end up ill, which gives them the excuse to say that it proves you have the illness and need the medication.

Doctors get plenty of benefits from prescribing drugs and are rewarded by pharmaceutical companies for their loyalty, so you have to take what they say with a pinch of salt.

You have obviously been on meds for a very long time, Natalie, so I am not surprised that you need them to function. It wouldn't be worth the risk to try and come off them in your case. But if people can reduce the dose at their own pace and if they haven't been on the drug for very long it is possible they might be able to stop it.

I get this argument from my GP when I talk about coming off Abilify, it's the drug with the 'least side effects', but it is also expensive, and is quite a new med, so there have been no long term studies on it. It is laughable that because it is seen as a 'more healthy' medicine it is the most expensive. That tells you all you need to know about Big Pharma and their values.

I would never tell anyone to come off their meds but I would try and support them if they chose to do so. While I am not saying that people should try it, as it is a matter for the individual, to believe that you need it for life if you haven't been on it for long would be a bit premature. The drugs are not good for your body, they all have side effects, and are most certainly not necessary for every person who is prescribed them, at least not long term, as the article states.

At the end of the day though it is up to the individual, and while in many cases it really isn't worth the risk, it shouldn't be discounted by everyone out there. Some people do need them, and cannot cope without them, but others don't and there should be alternative treatments available, sadly this is not usually the case in most Western countries.
 
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The way this world is it is unlikely to change. There are too many powerful people who want it to stay as it is. The point is you shouldn't feel bad or a failure for trying to fight an out of control monster when it has a much larger army. At least you have the guts to stand up to it and do battle with it, and that is unfortunately more difficult when you have been a psychiatric patient. The odds are stacked against you anyway, but the label applied to you by doctors makes it much harder for you to be listened to, it shouldn't be that way but it is.

I think if one person is motivated by your online posts and fight to raise awareness then it is a success, however small it might seem. Given what you are up against it is an achievement. :hug:
i do feel bad & a failure in ways about things at times.

Yea, it's a Balrog, a totally out of control & insane monster.

i hope that some people get something out of some of what i post.
 
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la femme folle

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Well I know I do and that others do too as they have said as much. You're not a failure if you inform people of alternatives and get people to question what they take for granted. Even people who don't agree must have had a seed of doubt planted in their mind by what you post and argue for. To say you have failed is just wrong.

You support people on here well and I know if I have a question about mh issues you would be the first person I would ask about it. :hug:
 
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la femme folle

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Just listen to their stories • A Disorder For Everyone!

"What is most extraordinary is that the current system of psychiatric diagnosis, embodied in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases, has been openly discredited by the world’s most eminent psychiatrists, including the very people who chaired the committees that wrote these manuals. This is something of which the general public and many professionals are largely unaware. For example, Dr Allen Frances, who chaired the committee that produced the fourth edition of DSM, has criticised the fifth and current edition in the strongest terms, saying: ‘There is no reason to believe that DSM-5 is safe or scientifically sound.’1 In the same article, he writes: ‘… disappointingly, 30 years of advancing knowledge has had no impact whatever on psychiatric diagnosis or treatment… DSM-5 hoped to include biological markers that might reflect past research and promote future research. This was a premature and unrealisable ambition: the science simply isn’t there now.’"
 
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Well I know I do and that others do too as they have said as much. You're not a failure if you inform people of alternatives and get people to question what they take for granted. Even people who don't agree must have had a seed of doubt planted in their mind by what you post and argue for. To say you have failed is just wrong.

You support people on here well and I know if I have a question about mh issues you would be the first person I would ask about it. :hug:
Thanks. Maybe in a percentage of cases it is primarily a biological pathology best treated with medication?

Arguing the toss & endless polemics with people for 30 odd years doesn't change anything, personally or socially.
 
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tawanan

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From what I've been reading on here and other forums, there seems to be a "conspiracy theory" that mental illness is not caused by a chemical imbalance. This is all a ruse by big pharma to sell more products.

All I can say is that I wouldn't be here if I hadn't taken meds.
 
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