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The dangers of anti-manic and/or "mood stabilizing" drugs.

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Princeton67

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May 19, 2015
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1) The literature is replete with warnings concerning the danger of giving anti-depressant drugs. To wit:
"Giving an antidepressant to someone with bipolar disorder could trigger a manic episode. Manic episodes can be dangerous, because you have very poor judgment, tend to use more drugs, drive recklessly, spend a lot of money, have much more sex - and have it completely unprotected. There's a higher risk of high-risk behaviors because there is poor judgment."

BUT - is not the converse also true? Giving an anti-manic drug/“mood stabilizer” triggers depression … which can be as dangerous or more so (suicide) as mania. I can find nothing in the literature.

2) False diagnoses of bipolarity need to be a consideration. Depending on the respondent's perspectives the results indicated by such indices as the Young Manic Scale can be misleading. I have personally taken a number of these tests. I have found that many, if not all, of the questions posed are ambiguous and can present the respondent with ambivalent choices. In my personal testing, I have found that HONEST answers can vary, and depending upon the choices the respondent renders and his/her analysis of what the questions truly mean, he/she may falsely be diagnosed as testing positive for bipolarity when the accurate diagnosis should be major depressive disorder.

I have some expertise vis-a-vis the design of questionnaires. Cardinal rules: Make certain the respondents understand what you are asking. Make sure that your questions are truly measuring what you are trying to measure. My expertise is limited
to the social sciences. Consequences of improper methodology in that arena are nominal. In the field of medicine, consequences can be lethal.
 
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BipolarJim71

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Jun 5, 2015
Messages
38
Location
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
You're correct. A Bipolar person who's taking anti depressants will send u into a manic episode. My doc specifically told that first you must het the bipolar mania under control before taking an anti depressant. You cannot do the opposite or you're doomed failure. I'm taking Lamictal, Depakote, Latuda, Baritone, prozac. For me, I've never felt better in my life. However I still get the manic episodes, but jot as frequent.
 
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Princeton67

New member
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May 19, 2015
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2
My specific question:
Doctor makes FALSE DIAGNOSIS of BIPOLAR and gives RX for mood stabilizing drug.
True condition is MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER.
Patient takes the improperly prescribed MOOD STABILIZING DRUG.
Reaction: Even DEEPER DEPRESSION. Yes? No?
 
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BipolarJim71

Active member
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Jun 5, 2015
Messages
38
Location
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Doctors use a number of different classes and brands of drugs to treat bipolar disorder. Treatment for bipolar mania may include lithium, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, and benzodiazepines.

Many people who have bipolar disorder keep taking these medications for years or decades after their last manic episode to stay healthy. This is called maintenance therapy for bipolar disorder.

During a period of bipolar depression, you might need other medications. Lithium and other mood stabilizers, certain antipsychotic drugs that treat bipolar depression, and sometimes antidepressants are used to treat bipolar depression.

For mania, depression, or maintenance, these drugs might be used alone or in combinations.
 
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