Teaching Mental Health In Schools

BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#21
my dad used to take me to the Childrens Library, it remains a happy memory, one of the few times I spent with him alone.

yes I knew I was giving them something but I had no idea no one else did. :(

its really sad but then again - when have Mental Health Skills like sitting quietly losing yourself in a book, ever been taught to any of us?

All goes back to what's in the curriculum.

Maybe if the Y gen was taught the importance of old fashioned reading as a Relaxation Tool, the kids now wouldn't be so illiterate :shrug:

no I don't know where your ID comes from btw I just did the Latin :D
 
Poopy Doll

Poopy Doll

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#22
MY mother also took me to the library. She never read to me, and when I tried to tell her about my books she said, "I don't CARE". So I stayed at my end of the house reading my books and she stayed at her end of the house reading her books (I wasn't allowed in her room) and in an odd way I got to be close to her by emulating her.

When I had my own children, I read to them but soon their father bought a Sega system for them and reading went out the window until the Lord of the Rings came out. The oldest read the Lord of the Rings.

My youngest is writing a book. He's thirty-something. He's taken author workshops. He originally told me the theme of the book was to disprove the existence of God. Raised in a yoga group, this is rebellion but I just encourage him to finish the book and get it published. When I published my little graphic novel, this was the best encouragement for him to see.
 
CarpeDentum

CarpeDentum

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#23
I think it's going to be key for someone in power to sit up and say: this is what the next generation need...skills and strategies for health and wellbeing particularly-mental health. If they don't do it now I think we are going to have a bigger problem.

I so wish I had the freedom to teach what I know they will really need, admitted we do a lot of it, the basics-a foundation to build upon. But we are challenged. As mentioned the children coming through the doors at 4 and 5 are not able to read as at majority. Some can't tend to their own toileting needs, a lot cannot use a knife and fork.
If we were allowed to completely focus on the basics first it could just about be manageable but we have to get them reading and writing, adding and subtracting. Reading has come before becoming a writer but if no one reads with their child at home then the twice weekly chaotic sessions just aren't going to be enough. They're meant to leave me on a reading level 6 if they're to make the expected progress in year 1. Frustratingly when I know full well that the class I've had have all made really good progress with me, it's never enough because of the level they come in at. I feel sometimes like that failure and the blame is directed at the foundation team rather than looking beyond that and putting the early interventions in place. Not many people fully understand the value of this crucial stage in a child's development and think that I (?!) just play all day!!! If I played all day I doubt very much I would be on this forum right now haha.

You've given me a lot to think of in terms of after school clubs that I could provide that address mindfulness, calming techniques and inspiring a love of reading again. For now I suppose I just need to get myself well enough to do that. It's emotional.

Carpe Dentum is a play on words that Robin Williams said as Mrs Doubtfire. It means: seize the teeth. :D
 
CarpeDentum

CarpeDentum

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#24
MY mother also took me to the library. She never read to me, and when I tried to tell her about my books she said, "I don't CARE". So I stayed at my end of the house reading my books and she stayed at her end of the house reading her books (I wasn't allowed in her room) and in an odd way I got to be close to her by emulating her.

When I had my own children, I read to them but soon their father bought a Sega system for them and reading went out the window until the Lord of the Rings came out. The oldest read the Lord of the Rings.

My youngest is writing a book. He's thirty-something. He's taken author workshops. He originally told me the theme of the book was to disprove the existence of God. Raised in a yoga group, this is rebellion but I just encourage him to finish the book and get it published. When I published my little graphic novel, this was the best encouragement for him to see.

Amazing. I would love to write books, I have so many ideas and have tried a few times to get started. I've never tried hard enough though, mostly through to self-doubt. Talking with you guys though is very inspiring.

Our children will read again!!!!
I think it's got to be up there with one of the best gifts that you can pass on to a child.


My grandad taught my nannan to read early into their marriage. She didn't stay at school as there was too much to be done at home and she was the only girl. My nannan was the one who took me to the library when I was a little girl. She used to read so many books herself that when she got older that she'd have to draw a little ring around a page number that meant something to her so that she'd know she had read it already.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#25
my daughter wasn't even 2 when she began reading, it was quite spooky to have this baby in nappies point to a shop sign and read it out to you....:eek2:
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#27
Wow! Your baby was determined to read!
and write, it seems :D

Yes she was always very bright, they both are actually but in different ways. Her brother hadn't even been near a computer at school yet, but had written advanced "cheats" for his computer games by age 8. Where the heck did he get that knowledge from? :shrug: Self taught it seems.

He's also been freaking me out since he was tiny. I remember when he was 5, he wouldn't walk past some turds because of the "stench". I'm not even kidding, I don't use that word at 50.