Teaching Mental Health In Schools

BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#1
It occurs to me that we are so focused on the right school and universities we are failing to teach our kids some super basic stuff about Mental Health.

Families (my own included) focus on Achievement and give zero coaching on how to actually be successful or fulfilled or balanced or happy or content, or even how to care for yourself properly with time off and holidays.

I think this should be taught in schools because we are seeing mental health problems in younger and younger children. This world is just too much, and they don't get any support, a lot are barely parented at all because everyone's at work.

I would like to see one or two hours a week devoted to subjects like self care, meditation, warning signs, ways to relax, ways to grow the positive pathways in the brain

all the stuff youre lucky to stumble across in a womens magazine :(

it should be taught to 5 year olds, imho. We are missing something really really important, in our drive for material achievement. Life skills.
 
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natalie

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#2
Here here, I have vowed for solong now, in fact for many years, that seeing as I happened to have been bullied in school, what we know in the UK as secondary education, they always found reasons for bulllying, and I don't just feel, it was because of my communication difficulties, that years later, and went brewed up undetected within me, below and behold - mental health problems. I feel certainly, that in all fields of education, and as you suggest for from 5 year olds and upwards, mental health and yes, including debt problems as well, in older life, should be taught within the school curririculum.


So I wish, that in the UK, governments should introduced basic mental health into education. This is a very very vailid subject to be broached, not only via on here, also hopefully, charities, in which I am registered with/support, will also raise awareness, about this, through their publicity awareness weeks, throughout the year if at all. In other words, campaigns ought to be instigated.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#3
imagine if schools had a class where children could put the details of a bully incident into a hat and have it read out but anonymously, so the whole class knew about the incident but not who it was, only the bully would know?

what sort of peer pressure would that create I wonder?

if there was open dialogue on an ongoing basis about kids feeling safe and part of a class as part of Mental Health?

instead of some principal standing in assembly once a month dribbling on about school spirit, there was Actual Tangible Classroom Efforts to Build it?
 
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natalie

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#4
On the other hand though, although I do like the idea, what you are suggesting, a certain so called bully culprit, supposing, if they weren't actually in that class set, and that maybe they, were located in a different class set, so therefore, they wouldn't actually have known, what went on so in this respect to read an account of bullying and kept the bullies name anonmyously, because the bullies themselves, would have been in a different class set, or subject group, talking secondary based here, I've been through that senario, that although the bullies, were in my subjects at school, secondary, they weren't actually in my own official class set.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#5
On the other hand though, although I do like the idea, what you are suggesting, a certain so called bully culprit, supposing, if they weren't actually in that class set, and that maybe they, were located in a different class set, so therefore, they wouldn't actually have known, what went on so in this respect to read an account of bullying and kept the bullies name anonmyously, because the bullies themselves, would have been in a different class set, or subject group, talking secondary based here, I've been through that senario, that although the bullies, were in my subjects at school, secondary, they weren't actually in my own official class set.
say little darling A takes little darling B's pencil

B could put something in the bully hat, Someone stole my pencil

so then the whole class including A and B get to talk about this incident - what do we think about pencil stealing kids, did it make the person feel bad?

therefore starting the discussion and the peer pressure.

If you have the whole class nodding and saying yes, that was mean, it made the person feel bad, that is Peer Pressure.

Its also a way to Out Behaviour. so the victim can include names or not, but the Education and discussion are entirely anonymous.

so Kid A who took the pencil gets to nervously realise its him who is being disagreed against.

do you see what I mean? and Kid A also gets a chance to see how others react (peer pressure), they may not see it at home, at home it might be, Who Grabs First, they may have no idea they were even really stealing or hurting someone.

this way, they get to understand in a non threatening way,, that maybe taking pencils isn't so smart.

also the group gets to feel just that bit more Protective of someone weaker.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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#6
I think it's a good idea. But then I think there are many things they should teach 5 year olds which are not on the curriculum. Meditation for example, that's beneficial from a very early age. And they should teach the basics of trading and game theory, that stuff is really important in making your way in the world.

Later in life I think there should be classes on comparative religion, for instance. And probably some mental health topics should be kept for a little later too.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#7
I think it's a good idea. But then I think there are many things they should teach 5 year olds which are not on the curriculum. Meditation for example, that's beneficial from a very early age. And they should teach the basics of trading and game theory, that stuff is really important in making your way in the world.

Later in life I think there should be classes on comparative religion, for instance. And probably some mental health topics should be kept for a little later too.
I sent my kids to Catholic College and Comparative Religion was compulsory. It was part of the curriculum, maths, English, Comparative Religion. Catholicism downunder is almost unrecognizable from Catholicism up there, that's why my friends priest brother was sent to the Vatican. He was too extreme for NZ tastes.

My kids went to school with Muslims. At Catholic College. :D

Its so different down here. I'd hate to live in Europe, so bloody classist.
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#8
our youth suicide rates are skyrocketing Downunder, particularly of females 14-40

It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out this Unnatural Statistical Bubble is somehow related to the feelings of failure most women are raised with

your tits aren't big enough, (now its youre arse too, wtf) your hair isn't shiny enough blah blah bs blah

Yes, Mental Health needs to be taught in ALL schools imho...our kids are dying. :(
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#10
Our old people are dying too! It's only the middle aged codgers who are still clinging on (that would be us).
my niece is dying in front of my eyes.

Her father hasn't even called me back. 3 days now. I have no words.
 
CarpeDentum

CarpeDentum

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#11
I teach this age group...( not right now obvs) but maybe if there was more emphasis on mental health and a more open dialogue then we would not have half the problems we have now. I wish I had more control on the priorities in our already packed to the rafters curriculum but I don't :low:

That being said just before I was signed off I planned as part of a unit of PSHE learning-1 week of learning based around feelings using the inside out characters and introducing 1 feeling a day to explore and discuss.
I made a powerpoint and resources and then sadly didn't get to see how that went with my beautiful children.

I have cried many a time over what our education system expects of these children. A one sized fits all approach from the policy makers that leaves teachers, parents and children alike feeling frustrated, bewildered, helpless and in my case angry sometimes.

It seems so blumin clear and just common sense that our basic wellbeing and life skills should be the priority and the foundation on which to build the other stuff. Why won't they let us do that? Let us just get on with what we're trained to do and passionate about?!

Anyway I said I was going to sleep, I really am this time haha. *Steps down from soap box.*
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#12
its so good to hear this from a professional

btw I love your ID :D
 
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Izera

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#13
I have cried many a time over what our education system expects of these children. A one sized fits all approach from the policy makers that leaves teachers, parents and children alike feeling frustrated, bewildered, helpless and in my case angry sometimes.
Kinda nice to hear from someone who's been in the trenches. I quoted that part because so many teachers seem to be the opposite. I've heard tons of complaints about how hard it is to teach when you have 10 IEPs to deal with. Those teachers seem to want a cookie-cutter approach, instead of meeting the various ways students learn.
 
CarpeDentum

CarpeDentum

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#14
Only just seen this properly.
Thanks @BDU Hehe :D do you know where it's from? Gold star if you get it right haha.


I think the reason teachers despair over the IEPS etc is that whilst there's been a push for inclusion and (a dramatic drop in funding and services which I suspect prompted the push) it means that class sizes are at the max in the UK in most schools I can bet, the cohort is so so diverse but yet the goalposts and expectations haven't changed to go with it! Meaning the pressure for attainment is still the same and when the results and data don't look positive or in line with national average then outside agencies come poking around and as a teacher your practice and provision is examined and questioned.
It's truly stupid. The pressure comes from the government that I think seems to be wanting cookie cutter schools and academies and corresponding 'good looking' results to show the world that the UK's education system stands up alongside the rest, and then the pressure filters down to local authorities, heads, senior leadership, teachers and then the poor children. The latter being the bit that really breaks my heart. Conveyor belt education with children being passed on up to the next level even though they're not ready or equipped to deal with it.

Below is something I just wrote to illustrate the struggle and frustration. No real names, not all EYFS provisions are the same but this example is as close as it gets to mine.

10 minutes in EYFS -My reality.
"Come and read" the teacher says (I have to get through 3 more groups this morning and then read with them all again on Thursday)

"No" says the child (busy learning through play, not ready to read, barely able to speak in a full sentence, he needs socialisation and less time in front of the TV or on the xbox)

"Everyone has to read, come on we won't be long and then you can get back to the sandpit" (I've got to go an do my outside duty soon, if I can't get these 4 year olds to sit down and read in their groups of 6 before 10.30, I'll have to just swap their books over. I don't want to call them out during their dinner time, they need to eat and play and I need 5 minutes to breathe, but I don't want to be seen to not be following policy.)

"Miss, Jack has fallen down"
"Oh dear, okay one moment and then I'll have a look." (Barely a scrape on the knee but I have to deal with it as there's no one else and policy requires I write a bump note to inform parents)

"Jack darling, have you had another type of accident too?"
*shakes head*
"I think you have lovely, okay let's send you next door to class 1. I need someone to go with him and take this note." (I can't leave the classroom but he needs changing asap, he doesn't have a care plan yet he keeps soiling himself everyday. We're meant to have 2 adults to one child when changing but how is that possible unless we stop everyone doing what they're doing and line all the children up in the corridor?)

"Miss, look at my picture, it's for you" (can I spend some time with you please? I want a cuddle.)

"Wowee, look at that! And you've written your name on it too! Well done you. (She wants to be by my side all day, she missed 6 weeks due to hospitalisation, but now I have to swap over to outside duty, the reading groups will have to wait, I wish that Jacks parents would come to parents evening, I'm really concerned, I keep reporting it to pastoral care and think he may have SEN. Now what was on that picture again?)
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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#19
my kids both had the same Reception Teacher and after the second child she said to me,

in all my career (35 years or something) ive had about 4 kids who arrived at school able to read; yours were two of them.

true.

sad but true. While their classmates were struggling through "baby" books mine were wandering around the classroom trying to find something they hadn't already read 15 times. They both got elevated a year, which caused another set of issues :(

My secret to having literate kids, was barely a secret at all.

I used to read, a lot, I was forever backwards and forwards to the library, kiddies in tow, getting 20 books at a time. I used to get them to take books out also, it was Pure Pleasure.

This apparently has a MAJOR effect on a little child. Monkey see, monkey do.

A friend who was a teacher told me some of her kids didn't even know how to Hold a book, and that the pages turned from right to left. :(

Also I used to read to them every night in bed without fail.

I bought them books every birthday and Christmas, just like I had as a child - a sack of toys and the books were almost the most exciting part.

Parents are either too tired or not educated enough or too busy scoring their drug of addiction or working 3 jobs these days, to read to their kids.

or, to read themselves.

Parking a child in front of a screen of some sort is Child Rearing, 21st Century style.

Its sad, books were the Main Pleasure in my life growing up.

And now, my daughter is a Published Author with a Journalism Degree.

Coincidence. Hardly. :(
 
CarpeDentum

CarpeDentum

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#20
my kids both had the same Reception Teacher and after the second child she said to me,

in all my career (35 years or something) ive had about 4 kids who arrived at school able to read; yours were two of them.

true.

sad but true. While their classmates were struggling through "baby" books mine were wandering around the classroom trying to find something they hadn't already read 15 times. They both got elevated a year, which caused another set of issues :(

My secret to having literate kids, was barely a secret at all.

I used to read, a lot, I was forever backwards and forwards to the library, kiddies in tow, getting 20 books at a time. I used to get them to take books out also, it was Pure Pleasure.

This apparently has a MAJOR effect on a little child. Monkey see, monkey do.

A friend who was a teacher told me some of her kids didn't even know how to Hold a book, and that the pages turned from right to left. :(

Also I used to read to them every night in bed without fail.

I bought them books every birthday and Christmas, just like I had as a child - a sack of toys and the books were almost the most exciting part.

Parents are either too tired or not educated enough or too busy scoring their drug of addiction or working 3 jobs these days, to read to their kids.

or, to read themselves.

Parking a child in front of a screen of some sort is Child Rearing, 21st Century style.

Its sad, books were the Main Pleasure in my life growing up.

And now, my daughter is a Published Author with a Journalism Degree.

Coincidence. Hardly. :(
Absolutely wonderful to read that!

And yes absolutely true, so many children can't hold a book the right way round and turn the pages. Very sad reflection of the times. I grew up loving books and would devour them; they were a treat. Now a 'plain old non interactive' book is just too dull for some. Monkey see, monkey don't.

Wish there were more out there like you. To take a child to the library seems like a strange and ludicrous notion to some but I remember those weekends very fondly.

Thank you for sharing that BDU. The proof is there plain to see.