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Talking Therapies Explained

nickh

nickh

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The Mental Health Foundation have published a new booklet entitled 'Talking Therapies Explained' which can be downloaded via a link at.....


The booklet is a basic guide to why and when you might want a Talking Therapy, how to find them and (taking up about half the space and most importantly) a good basic description of the various types of Taking Therapy available.

It seems a pretty good guide and the only specific fault I have picked up (admittedly I am certainly no expert!) is in the definition of bibliotherapy which (as the leaflet points out) isn't strictly a talking therapy at all; the leaflet's definition is a very narrow one - the wider and more interesting one, which is being worked on in some parts of the country, involves the use of many kinds or reading, but especially fiction and poetry, in a therapeutic context.

It can also be said that as a whole it is simplified (as it must be) and idealised - there are bad therapists (just as there are bad doctors, plumbers etc.), it is often very hard to obtain talking therapy on the NHS, it can be a long process to find which particular therapy is right for you etc..

But given these limitations this is still a good place to start for basic questions about what talking therapy is and the various types available.

Nick.
 
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riverx

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This is a website that is oriented to information, understanding, and has a potential for self help.
Hope its ok to post here?
It has a focus on the schizoid disorder.

www.selfinexile.com

its useful, humanistic and informative, :)
 
M

maudikie

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Nickh.

I have a good dictionary but even that doesn't give bibliiotherapy! I suppose if it's babies you deal with it's babbliotherapy" Take no notice I just do it for a giggle!!Anyway. thanks for the information.
I used to read a great deal.but it makes my eyes ache now, so I go to the radio where there are some very interesting talks and discussions. I get fed up with T.V. and am sure it dosen't do the youngsters much good. And whilst I am listening to radio I can get on with my knitting or crochet ore mending or button sewing on. Some of the oldies who have had strokes and lost the use of their hands, keep bringing me things to put their buttons on.
It's good to feel you are of some use if only a little.
:) Take care.
 
Carol

Carol

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Biblio- therapy ( Bible)

I understand this to be the use of the 'Bible' to help you with therapy needs. Actually this can be quite good at helping with therapy needs and is used extensively.

How wonderful to find that there are reasons for things happening, and to know God is in control and actually people have seen over many years that no matter how bad it may seem to be, it is not the first time our world or we, of this world, have been to this point and had problems. We learn that we can have many people working along the way to help us, and most of all God Himself will never let us down no matter how bad life may seem at any time in our life.

People do let us down, meaning so or not, but not God. We hold certain expectations for people in our lives and in the world, and even for ourselves and the minute one of them ( including self) slips up in anyway, we find fault and are angry and begin to doubt all things.

Th Bible can bring this fact out that we must love God with all our heart, mind and soul and neighbor as thy self" this is what the whole world should turn on the 'agape 'love. ( Easier said then done and we must know that as long as we walk this testing ground called "earth' the more we too will find we cannot and never will live up to 'all' expectations for anyone including ourselves.

Well this is a little of what Biblio-therapy ( Bible)can help us see by pointing out Bible verses that back every single thing said.

Carol

Maybe not truly found, but seems to work out as looking at the( prefix and ending of it and I know you already knew all of this anyway) :):grouphug:
 
trombone_babe

trombone_babe

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Nowt to do with the Bible to my mind, just biblio- is the greek-derived prefix for book.

As far as I'm concerned, if there were any sort of God, he wouldn't let good harmless people suffer like this. And I'm not prepared to enter into any sort of religious discussion about that.
 
maxitab

maxitab

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This is interesting. Some good links but no actual explanation of talking therapies unless you get a publication from somewhere. Can't be good.
Okay, the following is information I have and some is my opinion, all of it is based on my experience so apologies in advance for and mis-representations or inaccuracies.
Therapy = Psychotherapy, as distinct from Counselling......
What is counselling ?

Counselling is a process that enables a person to sort out issues and reach decisions affecting their life. Often counselling is sought out at times of change or crisis, it need not be so, however, as counselling can also help us at any time of our life.

Counselling involves talking with a person in a way that helps that person solve a problem or helps to create conditions that will cause the person to understand and/or improve his behaviour, character, values or life circumstances.


Psychotherapy, or personal counseling with a psychotherapist, is an intentional interpersonal relationship used by trained psychotherapists to aid a client or patient in problems of living.
It aims to increase the individual's sense of their own well-being. Psychotherapists employ a range of techniques based on experiential relationship building, dialogue, communication and behavior change that are designed to improve the mental health of a client or patient, or to improve group relationships (such as in a family).
Psychotherapy may also be performed by practitioners with a number of different qualifications, including psychiatry, clinical psychology, clinical social work, counseling psychology, mental health counseling, clinical or psychiatric social work, marriage and family therapy, rehabilitation counseling, music therapy, art therapy, drama therapy, dance/movement therapy, occupational therapy, psychiatric nursing, psychoanalysis and those from other psychotherapies. It may be legally regulated, voluntarily regulated or unregulated, depending on the jurisdiction. Requirements of these professions vary, but often require graduate school and supervised clinical experience. Psychotherapy in Europe is increasingly being seen as an independent profession, rather than being restricted to being practiced only by psychologists and psychiatrists as is stipulated in some countries.

Generally speaking, counselling is more sought after and readily available to 'the worried well' rather than by those who have a diagnosis of mental illness.
Therapy for those with a dx and within the NHS is undertaken by someone who (usually) has a degree and has then gone into Clinical Training (4-5 years long). All NHS therapists are required to undergo therapy themselves as part of their training and to have an ongoing form of therapy mainly to do with their clients, called clinical supervision.
There are two main theoretical/philosophical approaches.
Therapy that promotes change though insight and involves looking at past life events and important decisions made. The sorts of therapy that do this are:
Freudian Analysis
Jungian Analysis
Transactional Analysis
Anything with Analysis in the title.... these therapies recognise and use the existence of the unconscious, and consider the role it plays in our lives, not to the exclusion of all else, but as a major feature. I am not sure they are available on the NHS because classically therapy takes place about three times a week and is seen as a lifelong process......
The following also have an understanding of and draw on the unconscious, and are insight based:
Gestalt therapy
Humanistic therapy
Rogerian therapy.
The Expressive Arts therapies ( Dance, Art, Music, Writing, Drama)
Transpersonal therapy

Then there are the sort of therapies which I think of as Functional....they are looking at changing thoughts, patterns of behaviour, regulating emotions etc. The infamous CBT and it's ilk.
Cognitive based therapies usually only deal with the past only insomuch as it may affect present thinking. There is no exploration of it, and the role of the unconscious is often absent or not a significant factor. The basic premise is a chain that goes:
Thought - leads to feeling - leads to action - leads to more thoughts etc......
The notion is that if you can change the thought you can change the feeling, and if you are no longer feeling the same, you will act differently...so there will be a different outcome. Therapies are:
CBT. Includes a variety of approaches and therapeutic systems; some of the most well known include cognitive therapy, rational emotive behavior therapy and multimodal therapy. Defining the scope of what constitutes a cognitive–behavioral therapy is a difficulty that has persisted throughout its development.
The particular therapeutic techniques vary within the different approaches of CBT according to the particular kind of problem issues, but commonly may include keeping a diary of significant events and associated feelings, thoughts and behaviors; questioning and testing cognitions, assumptions, evaluations and beliefs that might be unhelpful and unrealistic; gradually facing activities which may have been avoided; and trying out new ways of behaving and reacting. Relaxation, mindfulness and distraction techniques are also commonly included. There are lots of different forms of CBT.
Psychosynthesis
NLP
Focusing
and probably many many more.
 
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maudikie

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Thanks for that Maxi. It was very interesting and informative. I think it obviously applies to people who have difficulties in interpersonal relationships. I also think that the more severe mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, manic depression and the obsessional behaviours require medical input, and probably, almost certainly medication.. My particular interest is schizophrenia and a great deal of research is taking place into this illness which varies in severity, and can be of two types depending on the previous character of the person. i.e. introvert and extrovert. Many people who suffer from this condition are clever or talented, but as the onset is not usually observable until about 17 - 25 and brings a great change in the person's outlook and sometimes behaviour, it is very difficult for the family to understand.. The reason for the age onset has not yet been explained, but a great deal of research is going on particularly in the U.S. but also world wide. Schizophrenia is a difficult condition to treat because of the lack of insight which accompanies it. Also the confidentiality of the professionals renders it difficult as the patient cannot recognise their illness, This is probably the reason that many refuse treatment and when there were hospital beds ended up in the revolving door system. Now that the psychiatric beds are few and far between it is more difficlt to establish treatment before they get into some sort of difficulty or trouble. Mental illness h as never had priority, and when things go wrong and the patient does get into difficulties the reporting by the media that they are "schizophrenic"" does little to help. But changing the name to Psychosis does not alter the illness /condition - whichever term you wish to use. Also the fact that it fluctuates does not help, as they can give outsiders who do not understand, the impression that it is an illness of violence. Thus the patient becomes isolated which does not help their recovery. And by recovery I do not infer cure, as figures have shown that some recover a little some a bit more and some not at all.(I haven't the figures to hand )
When the National Schizophrenia was started it was helpful in meetig the families, but when I became involved overr 30 years ago very little was known about schizophrenia, and unlike other illnesses one cannot take biopsies of the brain!
I agree that a great many people take themselves to their G.P. and say they are depressed when it is what I describe as the fed up depression, and I am afraid that too many doctors just dish out anti-depressants,ad.lib. Perhaps when we get more CBTs etc. this will improve. But for those with severe and enduring mental illness they require medication possibly as well as CBT> One of the difficultlies is that many of the medications have side effects, and the patient is given the impression that if theyt take a few pills for a few weeks they will be cured. Thus they stop or forget to take the medication and the revolving door comes into the picture, but now without any doors!
I have suggested that once diagnosed with one of the severe illnesses it would be practical for them to make an advance directive as to any treatment they would not wish to receive such as E.C.T. - or possibly a medication which has made them feel worse. This is something that the R.C.Psych + Government should work out. Also if they are being cared for by family it does not appear to be widely known that the carer can apply to have an assessment of need, which would include in many cases a regular weekly break. This could be arranged by opening some sheltered workshops for the patient such as the one in Cornwall - Pentreath Industries - which was rehabilitative for the patient and also gave the carer a break.
Thanks again for your reply. Maudikie.
 
maxitab

maxitab

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More about understanding talking therapies:

If you decide therapy is the way forward, or this is suggested to you, there are some basic things to ask yourself.
Why am I looking for therapy or why am I being offered it?
What form of therapy will it be and who will be the therapist? Are they properly trained, by whom and what clinical supervision do they get. Do ask these questions....I often feel we hand over our minds into the hands of people we know less about than we would bother to find out about a plumber!
Am I ready and able to engage with this therapy - can I or am I willing to talk about my past? What if there is 'homework'? How much effort am I prepared to put into it? Do I see this as a method for someone to fix me or as a working relationship of support where both myself and the therapist do the 'work'?
Have I got questions to ask the therapist at the first meeting and will I actually ask them......
Am I clear about what they expect from me and what I can expect from them?
 
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Roger Waldram

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Thanks for what you've written Maxi. Not sure you're right regarding personal therapy-certainly it is not a requirement for qualification as a psychiatrist & I don't think it is a pre-qualification requirement for psychologists either.

With BACP(counsellors) accreditation just 40 hours is required, with my training institute personal therapy was part of the training contract-so continued throughout & with BABCP (CBT psychotherapists) I don't think personal therapy is a requirement either.

Maudikie, I think I may have said this before regarding your question about the age of onset of serious mental illness, but here's some research;

"However, in writing of their extensive research into
‘The Two Trauma Mechanism’ where adult stress/trauma triggers childhood
trauma and psychiatric diagnosis, McKenzie and Wright (2003, p. 6) say of
their findings,
‘they vindicate the parent from blame because they identify accidental
traumatic experiences that happen to occur at crucial stages of development,
and about which no-one is aware.’
This is important since it frees the research field and parents from issues of
fault or blame that are unnecessary."

The authors' research indicated that problems from birth or childhood were triggered by stress or trauma at the key developmental stage of teens to twenties-a time of major change both physically and emotionally. "accidental-trauma' so no blame for parents. This seeking to deny the influence of upbringing is a factor that has & will hamper research particularly in America.

Sorry Maxi, I've gone off-topic. Though the essence of the outcome of my research was 'good-enough' relationships including 'good-enough' psychotherapy can lead to recovery from serious mental illness. (Perhaps I would say that, wouldn't I?). There is robust research that suggests that.

Roger
 
maxitab

maxitab

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Not sure you're right regarding personal therapy-certainly it is not a requirement for qualification as a psychiatrist & I don't think it is a pre-qualification requirement for psychologists either.
Thanks Roger, but I personally would never consider a uk psychiatrist to be a therapist unless you want to put that under physical therapy, i e meds. I know there are a few (very few) pdocs who also do psychotherapy here but they have all had and are required to have additional training.
All NHS psychotherapists (including those who do CBT) have to have undergone therapy themselves and all have clinical supervision. I can't guarantee the quality of the supervision.

Lots of other non NHS practising therapists meet the requirements of their training institute, so some will be required to have therapy and others will not....which is why I think it is important to ask. I personally would not want to have therapy with anyone who did not have personal and ongoing experience of the process.
These are good points to raise and I think point up the importance of not just accepting whatever and whomever we are 'handed' in the NHS.
I would also dearly love to see a widening of the forms of therapy available, with less predominance of CBT as the panacea for all ills!
 
M

maudikie

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Talking therapies explained

I understand that psychiatrists are firstly trained doctors and take psychiatry as their speciality. I think that any good doctor whatever their specialisty should have thepersonality which enables them to make good contact with their patients. But that psychiatry speiclialyreqires the abilitytomake good contact with the patient. Not just to see the outside of the person, but to in some way unjderstand their inner workings. I also consider that the outside lifeof the patient e.g. home etc. has a great effect on the patient. That overcrowding is contra-indicative to good progress of their illness. That good loving realtionships appropriate in the family are important. It is already known that patients who live in high E.E. families do less well than those in low E.E.(Expressed emotion) families' Now that the old mental hospitals are closed it is even more important that families are acquainted withthe nature of the condition and how they can best support the patient. ( am referring ijn particular to schizophrenia)
 
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