supermarket and schitzoprenia

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ramboghettouk

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#1
you know how at supermarket the expensive items they're hoping to sell are on shelves at eye level where they'll catch the eye whilst the cheap versions are in a corner or at the bottom, if like me you get flustered by a crowded supermarket and say some child is going off like a piercing siren, it's hard to search the shelves, you tend to pick up more expensive versions

today i bought some pasteurised milk for my neighbour from tescos, it's only when i got home i found i'd brought the organic version twice as much, it caught me eye, it looked the same, all intentionally planned by some tesco marketing expert

I wonder if i can argue it as extra cost of disability for pip and whether the dwp will listen

I said at the dla tribunal that i find the queue difficult and would rather go to the corner shop, since the dla has been cut by inflation

The queue the strong can bend the rules to go first and people don't dare say anything if your weak and make some small mistake you get a mouthful of abuse
 
When In Rome

When In Rome

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#2
I'm autistic and read everything pretty much literally. The problem I have with supermarkets is often the total mess the shelves are in with the offers and goods all in the wrong place. We understand people move stuff about but so often I have arrived at a till with something that isn't under offer like I thought. Most stores will be helpful to put it right - actually I just noticed reading again that this was in Tesco - this is the store where I have most problems I think. What you say about deliberate planning may be true as I remember spotting something akin to this last summer where the offers didn't make sense, being out of place and I took time to rearrange the whole affair, something else I cannot help but do.
 
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Tonic

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#3
Go to the supermarket to avoid people I am scared of.
 
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fidget

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it can be overwhelming i agree. Sometimes i like it though cause i feel like i have a purpose and with the new automatic checkouts i can buy ice-cream without having to look anyone in the eye

maybe you can argue you struggle to control your finances, good luck! i think that bit is probably more about people who spend all their benefits in a day rather than buy organic milk though.

this is one of my favourite clash songs, you made me think go it, hope you like it too xx
 
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ramboghettouk

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I'm autistic and read everything pretty much literally. The problem I have with supermarkets is often the total mess the shelves are in with the offers and goods all in the wrong place. We understand people move stuff about but so often I have arrived at a till with something that isn't under offer like I thought. Most stores will be helpful to put it right - actually I just noticed reading again that this was in Tesco - this is the store where I have most problems I think. What you say about deliberate planning may be true as I remember spotting something akin to this last summer where the offers didn't make sense, being out of place and I took time to rearrange the whole affair, something else I cannot help but do.
i have this thing with autistic when i was young autism diagnoseses weren't used then there came in aspergers and autism, i don't know what the dwp make of such diagnoses
 
BorderlineDownunder

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#6
i do big shops online and get them delivered :hug:

it saves me stacks of $ and also i loathe supermarkets with a passion, always have.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#7
i shop on line if i spend more than 100 i get free delivery from sainsburys, once a month i do a big shop i also go to the store to see the bargains and get fresh food, everything i buy if i use this card appears on line
 
BorderlineDownunder

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#8
i shop on line if i spend more than 100 i get free delivery from sainsburys, once a month i do a big shop i also go to the store to see the bargains and get fresh food, everything i buy if i use this card appears on line
yeah its awesome I love it; if only it had been around when I was a single career mum

maybe it would've stopped me Losing My Mind :(

I truly loathe supermarket shopping, just hate it, almost phobic.
 
burt tomato

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#9
I like the supermarket but i do most of my shopping online. it takes the hassle out of it. I start my next shop as soon as one has been delivered, and spend the next two weeks refining my order.

Peanut butter or honey? decisions desicions :D
 
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Twokiwisandabanana

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#10
I always think that it's the most unnatural thing in the world to be TRAPPED
With people looking at food your buying and the stress of putting it all in bags.
I cannot handle it.
Tesco and asda to home deliveries for 1 pound
:clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:
 
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Funnyday

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#11
I shop online as well. I usually get a delivery every ten days. The only thing I dislike is that the pickers are not as fussy as me when it comes to fruit. I always seem to end up with bruised apples when I chance it online.
 
BorderlineDownunder

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#12
I use Coles Online downunder and it depends on the Source store

at my last address the produce was always the Absolute Freshest because it was a massive store

now ive moved it comes from a smaller less busy store, not so much.

I buy the Big Stuff that I loathe carrying myself, cat biscuits, drinks, bulk rice etc. It saves so much money and hassle it pays for itself.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#13
my neighbour asked me to go to the supermarket for her, i said can't your church help, i'd been to the butchers that was enough shopping for the day without walking down a crowded high street to sainsburys and walking back to the bus stop with a heavy rucksack

On line shops from sainsburys umless you buy a lot theres delivery fees, theres also something to be said for actually seeing things
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

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my neighbour asked me to go to the supermarket for her, i said can't your church help, i'd been to the butchers that was enough shopping for the day without walking down a crowded high street to sainsburys and walking back to the bus stop with a heavy rucksack

On line shops from sainsburys umless you buy a lot theres delivery fees, theres also something to be said for actually seeing things
yeah but youre a man

a lot of women find supermarket shopping physically demanding too. :(

even steering a trolley around takes an upper body strength some of us just don't have.
 
When In Rome

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#15
i have this thing with autistic when i was young autism diagnoseses weren't used then there came in aspergers and autism, i don't know what the dwp make of such diagnoses
Not sure what you mean by this. One of the strangest things you see in forms is 'when did your condition begin?' er, we are born like this, of course - what do DWP make of such diagnoses? - I have other disabilities and so benefits are for each one, as an example I have 2 hours per day support which I receive £77pw but have to then pay the community support people that whole amount, we all have to do this. DWP contribute to my other problems in the form of DLA. As far as I am aware, Asperger Syndrome became a recognised condition in 1994. High-functioning autism or HFA which I have, I could not tell you but it makes no difference, the fact is that you come into this world with it, It will be recognised in childhood or later on, as in a lot of cases now, when you are adult.
 
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ramboghettouk

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Not sure what you mean by this. One of the strangest things you see in forms is 'when did your condition begin?' er, we are born like this, of course - what do DWP make of such diagnoses? - I have other disabilities and so benefits are for each one, as an example I have 2 hours per day support which I receive £77pw but have to then pay the community support people that whole amount, we all have to do this. DWP contribute to my other problems in the form of DLA. As far as I am aware, Asperger Syndrome became a recognised condition in 1994. High-functioning autism or HFA which I have, I could not tell you but it makes no difference, the fact is that you come into this world with it, It will be recognised in childhood or later on, as in a lot of cases now, when you are adult.
i'm not sure the dwp clarks react the same way to an autism diagnosis as a schitzoprenia diagnosis, i was diagnosed hebephrenic schitzoprenia negative symptoms predominating around 19 it was the late 70s aspergers didn't exist and autism wasn't used much
 
When In Rome

When In Rome

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#17
i'm not sure the dwp clarks react the same way to an autism diagnosis as a schitzoprenia diagnosis, i was diagnosed hebephrenic schitzoprenia negative symptoms predominating around 19 it was the late 70s aspergers didn't exist and autism wasn't used much
Well there is no relation of ASD with schizophrenia as one is a mental illness and the other isn't. I am not sure why you are linking these conditions.
 
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ramboghettouk

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Well there is no relation of ASD with schizophrenia as one is a mental illness and the other isn't. I am not sure why you are linking these conditions.
whats ASD and why isn't it a mental illness, told psychiatrist my nephews got aspergers he said theres quite often a genetic component in these things
 
When In Rome

When In Rome

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#19
whats ASD and why isn't it a mental illness, told psychiatrist my nephews got aspergers he said theres quite often a genetic component in these things
NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness | Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that affects a person’s ability to socialize and communicate with others. ASD can also result in restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests or activities. The term “spectrum” refers to the wide range of symptoms, skills and levels of impairment or disability that people with ASD can display. Some people are mildly impaired by their symptoms, while others are severely disabled.

Symptoms of autism start to appear during the first three years of life. Typically, developing infants are social by nature. They gaze at faces, turn toward voices, grasp a finger and even smile by 2-3 months of age. Most children who develop autism have difficulty engaging in everyday human interactions. Not everyone will experience symptoms with the same severity, but all people with ASD will have symptoms that affect social interactions and relationships. ASD also causes difficulties with verbal and nonverbal communication and preoccupation with certain activities. Along with different interests, autistic children generally have different ways of interacting with others. Parents are often the first to notice that their child is showing unusual behaviors. These behaviors include failing to make eye contact, not responding to his or her name or playing with toys in unusual, repetitive ways.
Scientists have not discovered a single cause of autism. They believe several factors may contribute to this developmental disorder.

Genetics. If 1 child in a family has ASD, another sibling is more likely to develop it too. Likewise, identical twins are highly likely to both develop autism if it is present. Relatives of children with autism show minor signs of communication difficulties. Scans reveal that people on the autism spectrum have certain abnormalities of the brain's structure and chemical function.
Environment. Scientists are currently researching many environmental factors that are thought to play a role in contributing to ASD. Many prenatal factors may contribute to a child’s development, such as a mother’s health. Other postnatal factors may affect development as well. Despite many claims that have been highlighted by the media, strong evidence has been shown that vaccines do not cause autism.

Autism is treated and managed in several ways:

Education and development, including specialized classes and skills training, time with therapists and other specialists
Behavioral treatments, such as applied behavior analysis (ABA)
Medication for co-occurring symptoms, combined with therapy

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as supplements and changes in diet
Though autism cannot be cured, it can be treated effectively.
And so, by professional definition, autism is a mental health condition but not recognised specifically as an illness.
 
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ramboghettouk

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#20
i think that depends whether your living in america or britain, but ok if you've got some disability like learning difficulties why are you posting here, wouldn't mencap be more your home

can't help feeling with the stigma attached to mental illness saying you haven't a mental illness is cool
 
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