Student Mental Health

amathus

amathus

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Joined
Apr 23, 2010
Messages
16,324
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goodness knows!
#1
NHS Choices talks about Mental Health:

Student mental health - Live Well - NHS Choices

"Key signs of a mental health problem if you're a student include weight loss or gain, decline in personal hygiene, and poor attendance at lectures. You may also do too much work, become withdrawn, or start speaking in an unusual way, such as speaking more loudly or showing more agitation than usual."

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Getting help with your Mental health problems:

"If you feel persistently unhappy or that you can no longer cope, don't keep it a secret. Telling someone how you feel, whether it's a friend, counsellor or doctor, may bring an immediate sense of relief.
Initially, it's a good idea to talk to someone you trust, such as a friend, member of your family or college tutor. This is especially important if your academic performance is being affected by your disorder. Many mild mental health problems can be resolved this way.
Many student unions and university student services offer student-led pastoral services. Although the students involved aren't qualified counsellors, you may prefer to talk about problems such as stress and depression with another student."

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R

Rebecca Louise

New member
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Messages
2
#2
Ive found that if you have any problems like this you are discriminated and thrown off.
 
C

Celebrity

New member
Joined
Aug 15, 2018
Messages
1
#3
You are so right especially in my country even the high courts discriminate.
 
A

anyajp

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Joined
Dec 14, 2010
Messages
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London
#4
Amathus (the first poster on this topic). I totally agree with you about academic performance being affected by mental illness....I started to feel depressed age 16 after my GCSE year. I forced myself (ages 17) to do my as levels in the high school sixth form which I deeply regret...I knew I should have left the sixth form and gone to the doctor to get my severe depression sorted out. Its no wonder I couldn't cope in the a s a level years....I really wish I had not stayed in that school...jeeze, I felt so ill back then. At 21 I had a bad break down of severe psychosis and got admitted to the early intervention team or psychosis...it was probably one of the worst times in my life....I felt like I was dying, I really did...It was a tough time for me but I pulled through some how and I am on better terms now.
 
C

Candy19

Guest
#5
school and colleges don't give a shit if you have mental health issues lol, why would they? they get a good ofsted report on grades not on students well being
 
T

TheRedStar

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Aug 4, 2009
Messages
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Location
West London
#6
Perhaps it depends on the institution you're attending? I can only say that both the sixth form college and the university I attended were helpful when I went to them at times when I was experiencing problems. My sixth form allowed me to spread out taking my A-levels so that I completed just one at the end of two years, and the other two the following year after redoing my second year in those subjects.

At university, I was allowed to defer handing in coursework for a semester, which in practice gave me the time and space of the summer holidays to concentrate on it. When I hit a massive low halfway through second year and simply missed a deadline (my head was in a place where I just didn't care), the module leader phoned me up, said he'd checked my records and seen that I'd never failed to hand work in on time before, and asked if I was okay... that became one of the pieces of work I was allowed to defer until the following August.

All that said, at neither institution was there much in the way of emotional support, but then I see that as the responsibility of the healthcare system rather than the educational one. That NHS mental health provision is fucking shit shouldn't be something that schools, colleges, and universities are put under pressure to help clear up.