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Stigma in bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder: time for a cultural shift.

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firemonkee57

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Stigma in bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder: time for a cultural shift.

Results

Four principle themes were identified from the interviews:

Cultural imperialism
Pathologisation: Participants in both diagnostic groups described experiences they viewed as ‘psychologically normal’ as being overshadowed by supposed ‘pathological processes’. This occurred within both healthcare and family settings.
Normalisation: In contrast participants also described experiences wherein their distress was ‘normalised’ by others. For example those with a diagnosis of BPD felt that healthcare staff, friends and family dismissed their experiences of ‘illness’. In addition, participants with a BD diagnosis also experienced such events in their workplace; where managerial figures, and welfare assessment officers, were perceived as being insufficiently flexible.
Stereotyping: Participants felt that in association with a diagnosis of BD there were stereotypical expectations of their behaviour, manufactured through media representations. Those with a BPD diagnosis in contrast felt that while there was little public knowledge in relation to the diagnosis, healthcare professionals assumed stereotypical descriptions of their behaviour.

Powerlessness
Participants described gross discrepancies in the power balance between patient and practitioner, with some describing little ability to influence treatment offered.
In contrast, those with a BPD diagnosis often felt powerless to resist exclusion from treatment. Outside of healthcare both groups of participants recognised the impact from over-protective families, or excessive work supervision.

Marginalisation
Participants with a BPD diagnosis felt marginalised in that a diagnosis was often withheld for protracted periods, or that no treatment was locally available. Little explanation as to the nature of the diagnosis was offered, further disempowering them as individuals and treatment, when offered, was often considered too brief or terminated too early when participants were deemed ‘recovered’.
Both participant groups also considered mental health services as marginalised in terms of mental health funding. Participants with a BD diagnosis found themselves marginalised in terms of employment and from products such as insurance packages.
Finally both groups of participants considered their mental distress as marginalised during discussion with their families.

Violence
Participants described experiencing physical and psychological violence during admission to healthcare settings. Violence was also experienced within personal and family relationships.

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SomersetScorpio

SomersetScorpio

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Thanks for posting.
Indeed, there needs to be a huge shift!
The stigma is ruining lives day by day.. it can't happen soon enough.
 
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lovagemuffin

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Oct 21, 2014
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all types of stigma are not helpful and just full of stereotypes.
 
megirl

megirl

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Apr 9, 2010
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stigma well and truly lives in all aspects of life.
It well and truly lived on the ward in a general surgical ward where i worked here in fucking nz the nurses that is most of the ones i worked with their would be snarkey comments in regards to any type of mental illness i think bipolar schizophrenia eating disorders were pretty much up there.

One nurse even discussed with me that she just cant understand it they just need to 'get over it theres no reason to be depressed' Their have been many people i could have bashed if i had the guts too i can tell you
But the so called nice me pretends that shes nice at times lol
no theirs people that choose to be ignorant how the hell can you be a truly empathetic and caring health professional with this attitude??? They obviously know how to pass their psych part of their training therefore they obviously do have the knowledge in regards to it but i guess having true empathy is something that cant be taught sad really
 
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Rowan

Rowan

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One nurse even discussed with me that she just cant understand it they just need to 'get over it theres no reason to be depressed'
She sounds like a ******* moron! I would have reported her.:mad:
 
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