Spirituality without Superstition

-Phoenix-

-Phoenix-

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Basically what I mean by this is a form of spirituality that does not involve adopting a belief system involving some/all of the following: past/future lives, karma, psychics, clairvoyants, chakras, special powers, magic, hungry ghosts, heaven, hell, fairy worlds, gods, demons, wizards, goblins, dragons, the flying spaghetti monster, etc etc. (though the last one sounds like an all-around nice entity).

What I'm finding is that spirituality seems inexorably attached to superstition, which I just can't take seriously. So, the question I ask is this:

Is Spirituality without Superstition possible?
 
Parayana

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Well there's the whole secular Buddhist movement of Steven Bachelor and Sam Harris plus others, personally I find it a bit dry. I've met some people who have psychic abilities and used to dream my future regularly before I went on anti-psychotics.
 
rasselas.redux

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did you foresee in a dream that you were going to 'go on' anti-psychotics?

@OP

we need to assert our own language to distance us from the flying spaghetti monster brigade. I'll put a few links in here later. Thanks for starting this thread. I'm sure there are many more out there that feel the same but feel too intimidated to openly talk about it.
 
-Phoenix-

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Well there's the whole secular Buddhist movement of Steven Bachelor and Sam Harris plus others,
I've read 'Waking Up' by Sam Harris. Secular buddhism is all well and good but as buddhists don't they still have to sign up to believing in karma, past/future lives and hungry ghosts?
 
Parayana

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I've read 'Waking Up' by Sam Harris. Secular buddhism is all well and good but as buddhists don't they still have to sign up to believing in karma, past/future lives and hungry ghosts?
No they don't that's why I find it dry and short sighted.
 
rasselas.redux

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here's a very good film about existential crisis followed by a very good play about it. both are profound in their own way, and unpretentious even if dealing with heady themes...

 
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For me being 'spiritual' i you insist on using that word is remaining curious and child-like, imaginative, humorous, humble, at times bold, crazy, angry even...

It is possible to find deep and moving truths even in the meaninglessness...

Alluding to Blake -- of all people -- we don't have to either return to innocence or remain in it -- as New Agers seem to be advocating -- but rather embracing Experience -- with nod and a wink to what came before
 
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FFS there I am above adopting the language of new agers about 'existential crisis' when in fact existentialism isn't a crisis. It's the kindling of personal truth. A crisis demands a resolution whereas existential insights have no resolution. They cannot be resolved except by recourse to mumbojumbo, the very bullshits the insights explode.
 
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I think just sitting in nature and seeing its beauty and accepting how tiny you are in the universe yet inexplicably unique, taking deep breaths, finding joy in small things, being a nice person, taking chances etc etc
All spiritual, in a personal sense.
A few fairies and myths are a bit of fun to sex it up a bit too :)
 
pepecat

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Is Spirituality without Superstition possible?
Superstition can either be:
Excessively credulous belief in and reverence for the supernatural: ('he dismissed the ghost stories as mere superstition')
or
A widely held but irrational belief in supernatural influences, especially as leading to good or bad luck, or a practice based on such a belief: ('she touched her locket for luck, a superstition she’d had since childhood')
(oxford dictionary)

I suppose all religion has an element of superstition inherent in it - 'If I believe xyz then I'll go to heaven', 'If I do xyz, I'll be saved' down to 'If I pray every day I won't get sick', or 'x happened because God willed it'

Bearing in mind that spirituality is about matters pertaining to the human soul / spirit and not about material things, then it's very to see how one can be without the other (spirituality without superstition). I think. Spirituality is about what is mysterious / unseen / higher / beyond comprehension I think......which is always going to have an element of superstition about it, because we just don't know about any of it. So who's to say what it causing what.

That doesn't make much sense.......
 
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People have lost the common bonds which once tied them together. The bonds which tied them to nature and its seasons.

We have become alienated consequently from ourselves, one another, and our environment. Some people consider 'spiritual renewal' as nothing more than a rediscovery of those lost bonds.

A dictionary definition of 'spiritual' would tell you otherwise. But thankfully dictionaries do not dictate what words mean now. They are simply a guide to what lexicographers decided words once meant.

Spirituality can be experienced without superstition... in its loosest sense of meaning, in terms of going beyond superficial bonds with other people (what can I get from them?) and the natural world (what good is it doing me?)... there are ways of renewing and reappraising ones life to bring about a deepened and more meaningful connection... which could be argued to be more realistically spiritual than attempting to negate ones own ego, or praying to an invisible being for change.
 
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pepecat

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Agree with all that, yes.

Could a connection with nature (for example) not also be called 'natural' though, as opposed to spiritual? Returning from whence we came and all that.....
Is that necessarily (or exclusively) a spritual experience?
Maybe they're the same thing.

Depends what you mean by spiritual, I guess..... as you said.

Words an all.....
 
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A non superstitious spirituality can be very well reasoned with a sober non-silly understanding of basic philosophy/metaphysics & areas of consciousness research -

http://www.mentalhealthforum.net/forum/thread119768.html

When all the cards are laid out however - materialist, dualist (most people are already dualist if you explain to them what it means, & they can comprehend the argument), pantheist, idealist, or any other well reasoned position - what bona fide evidence is there for any one position? Materialism requires as much faith & miracles as does idealism. Whatever the position is going to require an element of faith.

Ironically i think a paradigm consisting of spirit, psyche & physical levels of reality is more rational, & can be far more well reasoned than materialism. Indeed, give it 2 to 3 more decades & i think the current dominant materialist paradigm will start to shift to some form of panpsychism, it's inevitable. Another couple of hundred of years & i think humanity will arrive at a more collective acknowledgement of the spiritual.

Exoteric Religions are currently as much the problem as materialism, imo.
 
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rasselas.redux

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Whatever the position is going to require an element of faith.
That isn't true.

I do not require faith to exist. Nor do I require faith to have things like memory, imagination, sexual desire, bills to pay, visions, goals, plans, aspirations, or moral compass.

I do not require faith to climb a mountain and survey the prospect at the peak and be profoundly moved within myself.

I do not require faith to fall in love.

It is possible for me to witness a philharmonic orchestra and be profoundly moved without faith, or to read a novel or watch a play and be stirred to life-changing insights. All of that as far as many are concerned is spiritual, or could be deemed to be so, and requires nothing more than being.
 
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On any level you care to posit, consciousness and being does not require faith to exist.
 
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On any level you care to posit, consciousness and being does not require faith to exist.
How very Zen of you.

i agree, no it doesn't - An explanation/assumption for it (on any level) does however.

Earlier you were saying you have had a conversion to materialism/Atheism - explain that position then, why it's correct, without some element of faith? If you think you can then you don't understand the argument that's made for the materialist position. The best current explanation is the multi-verse - which is a non-argument & unprovable/faith based as well.
 
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rasselas.redux

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i agree, no it doesn't - An explanation for it (on any level) does however.
Consciousness from a personal point of view doesn't require an explanation either. Any more than a car won't start up and drive down a road until it understands itself or a planet won't spin around a sun unless it knows itself. There is a limit to self-knowing that requires humility.
 
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Consciousness from a personal point of view doesn't require an explanation
What is is - Had that realisation when i was 15.

No it doesn't require an explanation. Depends however upon what ontological assumptions/arguments/assertions are made, i.e. materialism, idealism or others. Hence philosophy, & the Age Old nature of this debate.

'No one' agrees on what is.
 
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