'Spiritual' people at higher risk of mental health problems.

BrianHorlicks

BrianHorlicks

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#1
By Stephen Adams,
Medical Correspondent
12:01AM GMT 02 Jan 2013
People who claim to be ‘spiritual’ but not religious are often struggling to cope mentally, according to a study.

They are more likely to suffer from a range of mental health problems than either the conventionally religious or those who are agnostic or atheists, found researchers at University College London.

They are more disposed towards anxiety disorders, phobias and neuroses, have eating disorders and drug problems.
*

In addition, they are more likely than others to be taking medication for mental health problems.

Professor Michael King, from University College London, and his fellow researchers wrote in the British Journal of Psychiatry: "Our main finding is that people who had a spiritual understanding of life had worse mental health than those with an understanding that was neither religious nor spiritual."

The study was based on a survey of 7,403 randomly selected men and women in England who were questioned about their spiritual and religious beliefs, and mental state.

Of the participants, 35 per cent described themselves as "religious", meaning they attended a church, mosque, synagogue or temple. Five in six of this group were Christian.

Almost half (46 per cent) described themselves as neither religious nor spiritual, while the 19 per cent remainder said they had spiritual beliefs but did not adhere to a particular religion.

Members of this final group were 77 per cent more likely than the others to be dependent on drugs, 72 per cent more likely to suffer from a phobia, and 50 per cent more likely to have a generalised anxiety disorder.

They were also 40 per cent more likely to be receiving treatment with psychotropic drugs, and at a 37 per cent higher risk of neurotic disorder.

The researchers concluded: "We conclude that there is increasing evidence that people who profess spiritual beliefs in the absence of a religious framework are more vulnerable to mental disorder.

"The nature of this association needs greater examination in qualitative and in prospective quantitative research."
 
BrianHorlicks

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#2
Is the whole phychiatry industry designed
To stop people becoming spirituality awake?

I think most people don't know or realise that this is what's happening,
Or even worse,
Is that the parents of the child who knows,
And tells them so,
Gets carted of the doctors,
Because the parents think their child is 'mad'?
 
Kerome

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#3
Hmm, perhaps the people who have mental disorders are more likely to become spiritual? How do they know which comes first, the spirituality or the mental illness. Unless they are tracking only the incidence of first episodes, but the article doesn't say...
 
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#4
Is the whole phychiatry industry designed
To stop people becoming spirituality awake?

I think most people don't know or realise that this is what's happening,
Or even worse,
Is that the parents of the child who knows,
And tells them so,
Gets carted of the doctors,
Because the parents think their child is 'mad'?
There has been/is a deliberate dumbing down of humanity.

Why?

Do we go with the ideas & essence of what Icke/Matrix 5/Tsarion et al/etc are saying about everything?

How deep does the rabbit hole go?

Any links between spirituality/mysticism/shamanism within mental health, any serious focus on psychogenic/sociological areas, & any serious focus on genuine healing - ridiculed, suppressed, ignored & denied.

All the areas of systems theory/Holism & associated areas - ridiculed, suppressed, ignored & denied.

Any genuine/serious environmental argument or any alternative system to the current one (especially any challenge/alternative to the dominant economic, political & religious system), such as The Zeitgeist Movement, The Venus Project, Thrive project, New Earth Nation etc, etc, etc - ridiculed, suppressed, ignored & denied.

The list goes on.

i think this Civilisation & our species days are numbered - i'd give it less than another 200 years. Am resided to it all personally.

People can laugh & be in as much denial as they like - we're headed to Collapse.
 
blacksmoke

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#5
By Stephen Adams,
Medical Correspondent
12:01AM GMT 02 Jan 2013
People who claim to be ‘spiritual’ but not religious are often struggling to cope mentally, according to a study.

They are more likely to suffer from a range of mental health problems than either the conventionally religious or those who are agnostic or atheists, found researchers at University College London.

They are more disposed towards anxiety disorders, phobias and neuroses, have eating disorders and drug problems.
*

In addition, they are more likely than others to be taking medication for mental health problems.

Professor Michael King, from University College London, and his fellow researchers wrote in the British Journal of Psychiatry: "Our main finding is that people who had a spiritual understanding of life had worse mental health than those with an understanding that was neither religious nor spiritual."

The study was based on a survey of 7,403 randomly selected men and women in England who were questioned about their spiritual and religious beliefs, and mental state.

Of the participants, 35 per cent described themselves as "religious", meaning they attended a church, mosque, synagogue or temple. Five in six of this group were Christian.

Almost half (46 per cent) described themselves as neither religious nor spiritual, while the 19 per cent remainder said they had spiritual beliefs but did not adhere to a particular religion.

Members of this final group were 77 per cent more likely than the others to be dependent on drugs, 72 per cent more likely to suffer from a phobia, and 50 per cent more likely to have a generalised anxiety disorder.

They were also 40 per cent more likely to be receiving treatment with psychotropic drugs, and at a 37 per cent higher risk of neurotic disorder.

The researchers concluded: "We conclude that there is increasing evidence that people who profess spiritual beliefs in the absence of a religious framework are more vulnerable to mental disorder.

"The nature of this association needs greater examination in qualitative and in prospective quantitative research."
yeah and the reason because we feel like we have caught the wrong bus and ended up somewhere that speaks swaheli.

its rather like being in an enviroment that is so harsh and toxic and somehow we have got to keep on keeping on. we care a lot more

Five in six of this group were Christian. yes for me when EVERY THING has failed me. all the quick fixes and clever intellecutualism that for me is hollow. sure its knowledge but not really wisdom imo. let me put like this. for all these quick fixes and intellectual heavy weights why is the world still soooo screwed up. :(
 
blacksmoke

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#6
Is the whole phychiatry industry designed
To stop people becoming spirituality awake?

I think most people don't know or realise that this is what's happening,
Or even worse,
Is that the parents of the child who knows,
And tells them so,
Gets carted of the doctors,
Because the parents think their child is 'mad'?
how can a sick society help let alone cure a sick person? well that's madness in its true form i reckon. worse than that i believe medication is just one big social experiment on the back of these big pharmaceutical companies that a making loadsa dosh thank you very much. ca ching

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0kcet4aPpQ
 
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#7
how can a sick society help let alone cure a sick person? well that's madness in its true form i reckon. worse than that i believe medication is just one big social experiment on the back of these big pharmaceutical companies that a making loadsa dosh thank you very much. ca ching
That's the truth of it all.

 
ScaredCat

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#8
Hmm, perhaps the people who have mental disorders are more likely to become spiritual? How do they know which comes first, the spirituality or the mental illness. Unless they are tracking only the incidence of first episodes, but the article doesn't say...
This is what I wondered too. Are they having issues already and have turned to spirituality as a way of trying to help themselves?
 
Kerome

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#10
“If you are nothing more than a biological machine, then what you think doesn’t matter. There is no you. Confirming this, deciding this, is the technocrat’s wet dream.”

matrix-technocracy-roots-conspiracy
Osho says that the more conscious you are, the more free you are. The problem would be if people choose not to be conscious, but instead get mired in the automatism of society's system of taught values and mechanisms.
 
BrianHorlicks

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#13
Hmm, perhaps the people who have mental disorders are more likely to become spiritual? How do they know which comes first, the spirituality or the mental illness. Unless they are tracking only the incidence of first episodes, but the article doesn't say...
I have another article.
 
BrianHorlicks

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#14
Spirituality 'link' to mental illness
Behind the Headlines
Wednesday January 2 2013

People with ‘spiritual views’, but not conventional religious beliefs, had higher rates of drug use
“Spiritual people are more likely to be mentally ill”, the Daily Mail reports.
Its headline is based on results from a survey of over 7,000 people in England. The research identified a group of people described as having a “spiritual understanding of life” but not practicing organised religion (for example, attending church regularly).
Researchers found this group were more likely to have a variety of mental health disorders and substance misuse problems than those describing themselves as religious and those reporting neither a religious nor a spiritual understanding of life (which for ease of reference, we will describe as atheists).
It is tempting to conclude that having a spiritual understanding of life (without a religious framework of regular worship) somehow causes more mental health problems, potentially through lack of social support increasing a person’s vulnerability.
However, it is equally valid to conclude that mental health problems cause people to develop a spiritual understanding of life, potentially through searching for alternative answers and explanations for their problems (as the American blues singer Bonnie Raitt put it, ‘Religion is for people who are scared to go to hell. Spirituality is for people who have already been there’).
This highlights the main limitation of this cross-sectional research – that it cannot prove cause and effect. It cannot prove which came first: spirituality or mental ill health.
Further research is needed to explore this potential link and how it may differ from person to person or culture to culture.
Where did the story come from?

The study was carried out by researchers from University College London.
The funding source was not stated in the online publication, but no conflicts of interest were declared.
*
The study was published in The British Journal of Psychiatry, a peer-reviewed medical journal.
The media reporting was generally accurate, although the significant limitations of the study were not highlighted.
What kind of research was this?

This was a cross-sectional study aiming to examine the association between a “spiritual or religious understanding of life” and symptoms or diagnoses of mental health problems and substance abuse. Cross-sectional studies are useful, but their main limitation is that they cannot prove cause and effect, only that two things are in some way related. This study was not designed to be able to tell us whether spirituality actually causes differences in mental health, only whether they are related.
The survey results were appropriately “weighted” to take account of non-response to the survey and to make the results more representative of the English population as a whole.
The statistical analyses were also adjusted to take into account differences due to gender, age, ethnicity, educational attainment, marital status and perceived social support. Social support, the authors stated, is known to be associated with religious belief and practice.
What were the basic results?

A total of 13,171 people were contacted to take part in the interview survey, of which 7,403 (56.2%) responded.
*
Those that took part were 46.3 years old on average, 51.4% were women and 85% were ‘white British’. Of these, 35% had a religious understanding of life (86% stating they were Christian), 19% were spiritual but not religious, and the largest group were neither religious nor spiritual (46%).
Prevalence of mental health disorders was similar between the group of religious people and those with neither religious nor spirituality tendencies, except that religious people were less likely to have used drugs or be a hazardous drinker.
Spiritual people were more likely than those with neither religious nor spiritual beliefs to:
have ever used drugs
be dependent on drugs
have abnormal eating attitudes
have generalised anxiety disorder
have a phobia
have a neurotic disorder
to take psychotropic medication (medication that affects brain function) such as antidepressants or antipsychotics
How did the researchers interpret the results?

The researchers concluded that, “people who have a spiritual understanding of life in the absence of a religious framework are vulnerable to mental disorder.”
Conclusion

This large national cross-sectional survey suggested English people self-identifying as spiritual (without religion) may be more likely to suffer a range of mental health disorders and substance abuse than those identifying as having neither a spiritual nor a religious understanding of life. Those with a religious understanding of life were broadly similar to the group without a religious or spiritual outlook for the majority of mental health conditions assessed.
This national survey highlights a potential link between having a spiritual understanding of life and worse mental health compared to other outlooks on life.
However, there are many limitations to this research that should be considered when interpreting the results:
First and foremost is that this, and all cross-sectional surveys, cannot prove cause and effect. Therefore, it is uncertain whether mental ill-heath in some way causes people to take a more spiritual view of life or whether a spiritual understanding of life is somehow detrimental to mental health. For example, people who have experienced long-term mental health problems may find more comfort in taking a spiritual worldview than a purely rationalist one.
Other factors may be at play, for example, people who describe themselves as spiritual may be more willing to use complementary and alternative medicines to treat conditions such as depression, which may be less effective than conventional medications.
Despite the researchers’ best efforts, the participants in the survey may not be generally representative of the English population. For example, the ‘religious group’ were mainly white British Christians of middle age and so the findings may be less applicable to other groups.
The absolute numbers in the different groups were not reported, only the differences in percentages. And without knowing the numbers of people suffering mental health or substance abuse problems in the sample, it is not possible to assess the importance of these results. For example, the researchers say that religious people were 27% less likely to have ever used drugs (odds ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.88 compared to those who were neither religious nor spiritual. Without knowing how many in this population were using drugs it is not possible to say what this means in terms of how many fewer people this represents – a 27% decrease could ran
religious people were 27% less likely to have ever used drugs (odds ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.88 compared to those who were neither religious nor spiritual. Without knowing how many in this population were using drugs it is not possible to say what this means in terms of how many fewer people this represents – a 27% decrease could range from just one person to thousands.
Further research is needed to explore this potential link and establish any causality and its direction. Based on this research alone, we should not conclude that having a spiritual understanding of life is bad for your mental health.
Analysis by Bazian. Edited by NHS Choices. Follow Behind the Headlines on twitter.
 
burt tomato

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#17
Having educated myself on spiritual matters, I am a calmer person now. My fear of death has eased, and I notice I have a craving for spirituality. I am not bothered about material pursuits as I was before. I think it has helped me on my mental health journey. When I was younger and going through the early stages of psychosis, I was effectively an atheist. Whilst this give me freedom to live, without the fear of being judged it also drove me mad in the pursuit to do everything in life so I would not miss out.

Now I know, that it does not matter about doings things like a bucket list, I am more chilled and more content to 'just be'.

In short I find this whole thread baffling and ridiculous.

I would wager that the spirituality touted by these newspapers is some phoney yoga type of anti-socialness.
 
Kerome

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#18
Kerome.
Does this help?
Yeah it does, it makes it clear that they do not know, and cannot know, how the relationship between spirituality and mental illness works. They only know that there is a relationship, not what causes what. And the fact that they say they do is an erroneous conclusion.
 
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#19
I believe that spiritual people may be more sensitive to unseen negative forces in our environment. For me, spiritual means being more aware of an innate need to have purpose and meaning.
 
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#20
Within psychosis/mental disorder how much can there be/is there spiritual pathology/delusions - it happens too. A lot also written on that subject. What is healthy & unhealthy spirituality? i think it's complex.

What are genuine spiritual experiences (positive & negative) & what is part of a psychotic disorder?