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Sister falling down occult / spiritual / religious rabbit holes?

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concernedsister1

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A few years ago, my sister was going through a manic episode where she believed her family was coming after her daughter and was eventually hospitalized and diagnosed as bipolar with traits of schizophrenia. During this episode she became engrossed in the idea of Ra and the Law of One.

She’s been doing better for the past few months, but a recent conversation has worried me a bit. She brought the topic up and I asked her if she would consider her belief in Ra and witch-related stuff to be akin to a religion, and she stated that she simply sees it as the truth. She also mentioned that before her medication, when she was “enlightening” herself with these books, she would reach euphoric highs that she is not longer able to reach. Which is a good thing, of course, but it sounds like she is seeing it as a negative thing. Which makes me worry that she may decide that she no longer wishes to take the medication.

I really need some advice on how to properly approach this situation. Though she has spoken to me about this topic, she doesn’t seem to bring it up with her husband or therapist at all. I’m entirely supportive of her and want to encourage her to pursue healthy hobbies, but to me this feels a bit more dangerous and unhealthy than anything. As she previously admitted that this type of stuff likely triggered her delusions, I worry that her continuing to dig too deep and getting too obsessed with this could be detrimental to her overall mental well being. However, I also fear that she may start to see me as an enemy if I try to discourage her from looking into what she considers to be the truth.

What should I do here that would be most appropriate to help her? Should I just sit her down and talk about my concerns directly? Should I talk to my parents and her husband first? Or should I just mind my own business…?

Or maybe I am looking at this entirely wrong and am being ignorant. If so, please let me know that, too!
 
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Zoe1

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I think taking an interest is fine
but in a more loose fitting kind of way
like let her know you are there for her
but don't get intensly enmeshed in her stuff
because I don't think that would hep either of you


:welcome:
 
C

concernedsister1

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I think taking an interest is fine
but in a more loose fitting kind of way
like let her know you are there for her
but don't get intensly enmeshed in her stuff
because I don't think that would hep either of you


:welcome:
Thank you for your advice. I'm a worrywart and I care about her a lot, so it feels like I should do something to prevent her from getting too obsessed with something that could be harmful in the long run. But she also lives with her husband and he has expressed no concerns to any of us lately, so maybe I should just keep those concerns to myself and continue to support her as is?

Thanks again!
 
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Zoe1

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yes because if you get obsessed with her obsession
then thats all heading in the wrong direction
 
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celticlass

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It is hard but we all can decide that we want to try without medication to see if we 'can make it' so to speak. That is a right your sister does have even if those close to her consider it is not in her best interests. Presumably she is taking her medication voluntarily at the moment? I wonder if it might be possible for her to engage in a service users group. Maybe she could ask her mental health team about possibilities. This would potentially open her up to her peer group where she will be able to share and compare. All you can do is try to encourage as you are at present and observe for the indicators of her condition deteriorating.
 
C

concernedsister1

New member
Joined
Jan 30, 2021
Messages
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It is hard but we all can decide that we want to try without medication to see if we 'can make it' so to speak. That is a right your sister does have even if those close to her consider it is not in her best interests. Presumably she is taking her medication voluntarily at the moment? I wonder if it might be possible for her to engage in a service users group. Maybe she could ask her mental health team about possibilities. This would potentially open her up to her peer group where she will be able to share and compare. All you can do is try to encourage as you are at present and observe for the indicators of her condition deteriorating.
Yes, as far as I know she is taking her medication voluntarily right now. And I know she obviously has autonomy and should definitely be able to make those decisions, just in my own head I want what is best for her. But I also don't want to be overbearing with my worries either, which is why I wanted to seek the advice of others before bringing anything up that may be unnecessary.

I think reaching out to or having a support group would be a good idea for her, too. That's at least a benign suggestion that I can throw her way if she's interested.

The idea of there not really being anything we can do unless her condition potentially worsens stinks as I want do what I can to prevent that from happening, but I will have to learn to come to terms with that myself.

Thank you for your input!
 
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