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Shamed/selfish for not taking meds (despite being well)??

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billybob99

New member
Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
3
Location
UK
Hi,

I have a history of mental illness which started out life as anxiety, and rapidly "mushroomed" into psychosis perhaps as a result of the medication I was prescribed (citalopram) a long time ago.

Since then I've had many high's and low's with various medications thrown into the mix along the way. My most recent episode was over two years ago and for the last year I've been medication free (out of personal choice) and feel better for it.

I recently told my Mum that I'd not been taking any medication for this length of time, and despite the fact I've been well she said that I was selfish and didn't think of other people. My response was that I should not have to take medication in order to make her feel better (seems to think if I'm taking medication then everything will be ok, which has not been the case historically).

Has anyone else experienced anything like this? I feel like for people who have experienced psychosis there is a strong sense of confirmation bias whereby the attitude is "well it's only a matter of time before you get unwell again". Perhaps there's evidence to back this up but I do not accept it's that black & white?

Any thoughts or shared experiences appreciated?
 
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Roseessa

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 11, 2018
Messages
100
Location
Nottingham
You have to do what is best for you and if you feel better not taking the medication than thats what you need to do, just like if you felt better on the medication than you should take it. Like I said do what is best for you, you know yourself better than anyone
 
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billybob99

New member
Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
3
Location
UK
You have to do what is best for you and if you feel better not taking the medication than thats what you need to do, just like if you felt better on the medication than you should take it. Like I said do what is best for you, you know yourself better than anyone
Hi Roseessa, I couldn't agree more. I suppose I'm interested to learn if others have experienced this sense of pressure / guilting into taking meds? I can't be the only one
 
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Worriedyin

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 2, 2019
Messages
193
Location
UK
I know in my area they actually encourage patients with psychosis to taper off medication when they are well enough to do so, so it's not set in stone that you have to be on medication to be well.

There are some studies which show that you're more likely to achieve recovery off medication than on it, too, which is an interesting alternative.

Having said that, family worries are important - I've extended my taper for a couple of weeks as there's been a big event in the family and it would be a bad time to be ill again. So I can see both sides of the argument.
 
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linus

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2019
Messages
573
Location
Eastern Europe
"Our" psychiatrist told us that the international medical protocol for a first episode psychosis is to use the anti-psychotic at least 1 year and then discuss the tapering off. This is according to the largest stats available and it says that with such protocol you have the best chances for recovery without relapse. Of course in the end details matter for an individual (if it was started because of drugs, special trauma, etc), but if you are on a low dose and don't experience any weird disconnections with the reality (understanding and properly observing what's around you, rather than paranoid thoughts, etc) you should target a med free life after a FEP.
 
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