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Sent home from military

K

Khuu556

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2015
Messages
7
Hey everyone, new guy here. So my this is my situation, and if you make it all the way through in reading, I greatly appreciate your patience.

I joined the Air Force last year as linguist, and I entered basic training on April 1st and graduated May 28. I went on to my language school in California shortly afterward. I didn't start class for a few weeks, and it was a very depressive time for me. I was absolutely miserable. I felt like a fish out of water, and I was at very prestigious school which greatly intimidated me. I got so homesick and depressed, you've heard it before, and all I wanted to do was leave. I had to go through in processing and a lot of paperwork. I lost all energy and motivation. When class started, I felt like I needed to talk to someone. My command had me sent to mental health in fear of me resorting to self harm. So I went, and they decided to let me go to class and see how I did. So I did. They gave me a small dose of Zoloft and would follow up with me in a few weeks.

I won't deny it was a very tough language course. It was a year long. I had classes eight hours a day with ten minute breaks and lunch, PT/exericse after school, and two and a half to four hours' worth of homework and study afterwards. I was still having trouble because I was still miserable. Ironically, class helped take my mind off of things. I came to somewhat enjoy the classwork and my fellow service members/students. However, when I spent time alone all I could think about was going home. I did what I could to take my mind off things: I ran, or wrote or went downtown with some people, whatever. It's difficult to describe because my mindset was so different depending if I was in class or by myself. I didn't have any more incidents of suicide watch. I was always tired but I think that was more from studying. I managed to make 90s and above on daily vocabulary quizzes and participated in class. My PT scores were fine. I never had any alcohol related incident or any type of trouble. I went with things for a while. I was in class for about two months before I was pulled out. My command had initiated an entry level separation proceedings, so I was discharged with an uncharacterized discharge, meaning command didn't have enough time to evaluate my performance. I got sent home at the end of August. My discharge paperwork has reason of discharge to be an adjustment disorder, and I am "medically disqualified from all service branches". :low:

What I wanted to ask was if low t had anything to do with it. I hadn't really considered it until a friend brought it up. I am twenty years old. I've never had a girlfriend or sexual contact of any kind. Frankly, I'm not interested. I've read a little bit about the symptoms of low t, and low muscle mass and depression were listed in symptoms. I'm no doctor and I was curious if this was somehow a factor in my depression. I've always been a mellow and laid back person by nature.

I won't deny that I wasn't depressed for a time. I described my situation with as much sincerity as I can. It was a roller coaster of emotions, and I remember my brief time in it like it was yesterday. This whole thing eats at me everyday. I wish I could forget it altogether. I met alot of good people in there. My teachers were natives of Pakistani. Some were Muslim and they are some of the nicest people I have ever met. It's unfortunate that they are given a bad rep. It was quite a cultural experience. My sergeant/language instructor who pulled me out of class said, "I can say you're one of the brightest, you have a lot of potential." There were only twelve of us in class. That just meant the world to me, but there was nothing I could do.

With that being said, how does one overcome this??? I just feel trapped at home. I'm at a community college, but it pales in comparison to what I was a part of. I make good grades, but I am bored to death. I feel stuck. I live in a small town with nothing going for it. I don't really want to go to college. All I want to is travel or do something to get away a while. I have done what I can to help fight this. I practice martial arts and run and read. It's just that all my friends have moved on so I have very little contact with people, and it gets so lonely. Plus, I don't have a good home life. It's bad enough to feel like some of my family looks at me like I was a criminal for being discharged. :low:
 
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Mark_01

Mark_01

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2013
Messages
2,590
Location
California
I assume you went to the Monterey Language School? Are you considered a Veteran? Also, you can get an upgrade on your discharge to Honorable so long as you didn't get drunk and steal the general's jeep. Very important, make sure your mental condition was caused by your military service.

And welcome to the Forum.
 
K

Khuu556

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2015
Messages
7
Yes, I was at the Defense Language Institute. No, I'm not considered a veteran because I wasn't in long enough, and from what I have found there is no "upgrade" for my kind of discharge. Plus, I haven't had any luck with recruiters working my situation.
 
Mark_01

Mark_01

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2013
Messages
2,590
Location
California
I would go through you local veteran's service officer for a discharge upgrade, most counties have one. I am not sure as to what the new rules are, I was in 70-73. If your problem was caused by your military service, you are eligible for certain medical benefits. I would make very sure as to your status. Have you been to a Veterans' Hospital for treatment?

PS: Recruiters are not the people to see about Veteran benefits.
 
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K

Khuu556

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2015
Messages
7
I'm not eligible for VA benefits because I wasn't in long enough.
 
Mark_01

Mark_01

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2013
Messages
2,590
Location
California
If your condition is service connected, it doesn't matter how long you served. They have your service medical records and if they say you were being treated for depression with Zoloft, you might have a claim. I would contact your Veterans Service Officer and make sure. Long ago, I use to write for a Veterans' newspaper, most of my columns were about Veteran benefits. Also, I wrote about discharge upgrades. I'll admit that things changed in many ways in 1981, but things have also remained the same. For example, if they agree your condition was caused by your military service, they may pay for future treatment and medication(s). You may not qualify for a service-connected disability pension, but you may qualify for psychiatric medications which can be very expensive. It doesn't hurt to apply, especially if you are currently taking medication for your condition. Just thought of this, if you are currently on Medicaid/Medical, you might qualify to be treated at a Veterans' hospital. It is up to you.
 
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