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Returning to work after years of unemployment ?

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Bb2019

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Jun 1, 2019
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Ireland
I'm nearly 25 and have been unemployed since I was 18 , I studied hairdressing for a year last year but it's not for me so I'll never use it ...I can't see me being able to work for at least another year or 2 so by then I'll be 8 years unemployed ! Would anyone even want to give me a job ? I don't know if there's even any point trying to work on myself if nobody would even give me a chance to work ... so I'm wondering has anyone else got a job after long term unemployment ?
 
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natalie

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Aug 1, 2014
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I'm not about to probe into your background, however, if you do have certain issues, and this is how you arrived onto this forum website, then, your best bet forward would be volunteering. You can still be skills creative only voluntary work. You might have to apply or reapply for benefits, medical benefits such as ESA and or also PIP which used to be formerly known as Dissability Living Allowance.

Unfortunately, due to my original mental ill health and I have been recovered well and on med, for many years, well, I say, recovered well I still do have odd acute problems from time to time, whilst on med, I just haven't been able to entertain the idea of paid even part time paid work.

So as I suggest, your best way forward would be volunteering.

i wish you luck, and well with your goals to be in work of some form, eventually.
 
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Worriedyin

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Oct 2, 2019
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197
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UK
Is there an employability service you could use to help you prepare for going back to work? I'm really interested to hear if anyone has managed to go back to work after a long break, there must be people as it's quite normal for other reasons I.e. Raising children etc.

I work part time at the moment as was worried about having a long career break but it's a pain really as not that much better off than not working.
 
LizBo

LizBo

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Down-under
Hey there @Bb2019, @natalie and @Worriedyin

I'm currently interviewing for positions after a 5 yr break from a breakdown in my workplace. I grieved a 30 yr career in the govt sector during this time due to not feeling a valuable contributor to my community anymore.

I turn 60 in a few weeks so I thought finding a job would be impossible, but there are plenty of organizations out there who respect maturity and lived experience.

Our state govt has introduced enormous funding packages for org's to employ Mental Health Peer Support staff. It's early days yet, but I've managed to interview four times; the last one on Thursday's looking promising.

What I'd say to you Bb, is look back at your life and jot down activities, subjects, likes/dislikes and especially dream jobs in a journal, even going as far back as your first school days. This time's before outer influences corrupt our thinking and desires. Hopefully it'll reveal a story so to speak.

As Nat says, volunteering is a great way to gain experience you can include on your resume' to provide perspective employers a glimpse of who you are. If you're not confident with creating one, there's plenty of employment agencies who'd be willing to lend a hand.

Also, having a 5 yr plan could spur you on. It shouldn't be set in stone, it's moreso an evolving set of ideas and how you think you could achieve them.

Hope this was helpful hun. I wish you luck in your endeavors.

Liz x
 
LORD BURT

LORD BURT

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Mordor
Set your target. Then move in that direction. By simple logic, you will get there.
 
neorealism

neorealism

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North East of Scotland
Start with voluntary work, gives you and any perspective employer an opportunity to scout each other out. Gives you a chance to see what you like and don’t like.

I spent nearly 6 years unemployed from 21 through to 27, lying in bed. Voluntary work was the gateway to better things.
 
daffy

daffy

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I agree with what the others have said i think voluntary work is the way for you. Potential employers see it and it shows thats you have kept yourself occupied . There lots of different volunteering you can do just look up on the net for opportunities in your area. I’m now retired but spent 8yrs voluntary in a charity shop while on esa and now volunteer in an office one morning a week and help out with an elderly charity
 
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ramboghettouk

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my take on things negative is if you move towards work side you leave the sick side and if you depend on sick benefits for an income that can be a problem

i remember all those years ago on the employment training there was unoficial streaming, there was a stream of women returning to work who could explain they're unemployment to an employers satisfaction in terms of having children, then there were the disabled and black people who would get used as cheap labour for a while and never get a job, you did 6 months work experience whilst getting benefits
 
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ramboghettouk

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good work if you can get it and good work if you can do it
 
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Poppyflower

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Aug 16, 2014
Messages
86
I was unemployed for 6 years after graduating University and it was the worst time of my life. I built up to employment by doing voluntary work. When I felt ready I applied for paid part-time work and got a job as a support worker for people with learning disabilities.

I think care assistant/support worker jobs are generally pretty easy to get because if you can demonstrate you are a compassionate person who can care for others then the employers don't tend to mind about other things (such as loang-term unemployment).

After 7 months here I moved onto a full-time job. While I stayed in this job for 18 months, I'll admit I struggled and had lots of time off sick, which was problematic. I had to attend meetings about my attendance, which was horrible. I found the job and the hours too difficult.

Now I am working part-time again (20 hours a week) in a job I love and working has done wonders for my mental wellbeing. I would like to work full-time again in the future but for now I'm doing what I can manage.

I hope this helps you in some way and that you'll be able to work in the future when you are ready.
 
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ramboghettouk

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i think you need an enhanced crb check for a care worker job, and since i told that bigoted policeman i was schitzoprenic and spent the night in the cells i don't know if i'd pass

part time it's fine if you've got a private sick pension you can earn on top of but with means tested benefits most of the money will be taken off you and whats more you'll lose disability benefits on the ground you are capable of work

must admit that may only be my situation and i'm been optimistic in considering myself capable of work
 
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BlueYou

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Oct 17, 2019
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Cthulu Holiday Inn
If you're looking to return to the workforce after several years out of work, first step would be to find all the resources in your area to help you - job clubs, outreaches, anything that can help and support you.

You basically need two things: a general plan and a presentable CV. A good job club will help you with both of these.

Retail and catering are two sectors which are good for easy access employment and are always looking for people. Call centres are accessible too but they can be very high pressure.

Look at large retail brands, restaurants/fast food chains, they are almost always looking for cashiers, porters, and warehouse workers. These kinds of jobs will not care so much about your history in comparison to others.

So if your plan was to work in a large retail chain, build your CV and concentrate on your skills i.e. communication skills, computer literacy, and so on. It may not be huge or impressive, but you don't need it to be. Then send it out to as many chains as possible online - indeed.com is a great one at the moment.
 
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ramboghettouk

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i heard i'm on a identity fraud register and that can effect my employment prospects what employment prospects, it's a long way to fit for work on drugs for schitzoprenia or the diagnosis
 
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