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pepecat

pepecat

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Please note this has been approved by mods / admin

Hello everyone,

Have you ever had therapy for a personal or mental health problem? (e.g. counselling, CBT, DBT, couples therapy).
If so, would you be interested in taking part in the survey I have created for my MSc Clinical Psychology Masters dissertation? I am a masters student working towards becoming a clinical psychologist in the UK. I am very interested in hearing about your experiences with your therapist and the therapy itself, and to what extent you were satisfied with the service.
To date, there is very little research looking into the clients perspective of therapy and whether or not they find therapy to be a successful treatment for their personal/mental health problems.

Anyone is welcome to take part, however, you have to be over 18 years old and have finished a course of therapy. All responses remain anonymous and confidential and your help would be VERY much appreciated!
Please click on the link below and follow instructions! It only takes 10-15
minutes:

https://sdu-surveys.herts.ac.uk/psychotherapy/

Thank you very much.

Charlotte
 
pepecat

pepecat

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Just so that people are aware, one of my roles as mod is to assess and approve requests for research, and if they are suitable, to then put them on the forum with a note to say they've been approved.

The requests are not MY personal research - I just approve them and stick them on here.
 
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ramboghettouk

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i don't think the people on this forum should be used as research guinea pigs regardless who's conducting the research
 
Wiseowl

Wiseowl

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Particpation in any research on MHF is entirely voluntary.

As Pepecat said we do assess the validity of researchers wanting to conduct research on MHF, paying close attention to the ethical implications.

It allows members of the forum to give their opinions, express their views and share their experiences, if they so choose.
 
clockworkmonkey

clockworkmonkey

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Only my opinion.
ld share my dbt stuff but as useuall i never finnish anything.So cant.But would if i thought it would help in making things better for people mh wise.
Plus pepecat is a member not just a person just on here to round up ginuie pigs.CM.
 
pepecat

pepecat

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The proportion of requests we get that are approved and put on the forum is pretty small compared to the total requests we get. A lot of people get filtered out at the inital stage when we send them a series of questions asking what the research is about and how it could benefit people with MH issues or the forum as a whole.

As Wiseowl said, there is no compunction to take part in research if you don't want to. It does give us a chance to put our views across though, even in a small way, and being a mental health forum we are a self selecting bunch, so it makes it an obvious place for people to come to to find participants - hence the large number of requests we get.

The last one that got approved and put on the forum was back in June, so there's maybe only five or six a year at most.
 
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ramboghettouk

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the ethical implications are from your ethical position, most of the mods here are pro therapy anti medication and that is a position

Not that i can't see the argument it's just those in long term therapy will tend to have money and be in a non poverty position
 
pepecat

pepecat

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For the purposes of research we don't really have an 'ethical position'.
Some requests are frankly, daft, and others are unsuitable. I turned down one a few weeks that was asking for people's opinions on their therapists having therapy - i.e how do/would you feel about your therapist having therapy.
It didn't stand up to scrutiny, so we turned it down.
 
Jaminacaranda

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It is voluntary rambo. Although what bothers me about this sort of research is that it benefits the researcher (they get to finish their course) and possibly nobody else at all. Even if it gets published in a scientific journal, you often have to pay to read it. It may yield interesting results and get cited in other people's meta-research - but then what happens? I'd venture nothing at all. There is no communication between academic researchers/ policy makers / people who deliver support and care - or at least little that results in positive action for service users. Indeed, service users usually have absolutely no voice and have no influence within the system. It's patronising. AND we all know it will amount to answering a questionnaire in the format rate your agreement with the following statement on this scale from 'agree very much' to 'not at all'...or how often do you think/feel 'x' on a scale from 'often' to 'never' etc...

Anybody can do research like that. I certainly could. It's simplistic. It's unreliable. It is incapable of analysing the complex reality of mental health problems and treatment. It is based on so many assumptions that are in themselves not proven.

So yes, rambo, I'm not impressed but perhaps for different reasons to you.

Sorry for the rant - bit passionate about this!
 
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ramboghettouk

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what is daft and what is unsuitable is a position, i think in the last year of a councilling course all therapists are required to have therapy
 
pepecat

pepecat

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the ethical implications are from your ethical position, most of the mods here are pro therapy anti medication and that is a position
The 'ethical implications' you refer to are on the researcher. Anyone doing research with people has to complete an ethical approval form and have it approved by their University, which details how any personal information will be stored / used / will it be anonymised / if it will be published (and where). The form also includes details of how particpants will be de-briefed after taking part in the research, and provde details of who they could contact if they found taking part in the research triggering.

We ask to see that form so that we know that anyone putting a research request on the forum is going to handle / store / use information you provide correctly.
 
Wiseowl

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Personally, not that I am involved at the moment with research requests, I do not take one stance or the other. I think that it is about what support is best for each individual.

I do think that medication is too easily given out as the only solution, on its own and without people being informed what the side effects may be.

I think that there are good and poor therapists. I also believe that the quality of talking therapies on the NHS is generally low. I believe in the validity of some alternative therapies and non NHS IAPT therapy approaches.

I support an eclectic approach towards mental health.

I know many people in long term therapy who are not rich and scrape by to afford private counselling/therapy at the concession rate because they are unable to the support they need through the NHS.

Yes those in poverty are at a disadvantage and I believe they should get access to good quality talking therapies if they want them.
 
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ramboghettouk

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i strongly suspect the ethics of the researcher and the uni are not shared by those they're doing research into

Remember when i was going to highcroft for my depot, one psychiatrist arranged for his daughter doing a clinical psychology course to have a room at the stockland clinic to do research on the schitzos at the time didn't understand what was wrong with that
 
pepecat

pepecat

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It is voluntary rambo. Although what bothers me about this sort of research is that it benefits the researcher (they get to finish their course) and possibly nobody else at all.
I agree actually, and probably in the vast majority of requests we get here (usually for undergrad or MSc courses), that is true. But by the very nature of those courses, that is going to be the case, because undergrad and Masters level courses don't require students to come up with some ground-breaking new fangled theory, so we do get a lot of fairly 'simple' seeming proposals come through.
I don't think we've had any PhD researchers here.....but I could be wrong!

I'm also not mad on the 'here's a bunch of mad people, lets use them for research' mentality which can exist, and again that's why we have a criteria which people have to meet, and a lot of those requests do get filtered out.
 
Wiseowl

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The ethical guidelines of universities and organisations like the British Psychological Society are constantly evolving, changing in response to societies morals and learning from past mistakes.
 
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