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Recovering from mania-entering depression

K

keith74

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But this is MY view; Keith you seem to be pretty sure that behavioural methods won't help your wife. Try to keep an open mind, I've learnt a lot from websites like this and the experience of others. I'd also advise you and your wife to read round the subject of bipolar - there's a vast amount of info out there that will help. Best wishes, GK.
I have been researching for awhile and came to the conclusion that behavior methods aren't as helpful in the acute phase. I agree with Julie Fast's opinion in her post below:
http://instagr.am/p/CIQ2IuID_O0/
Key quote:
Practices that do help with emotional regulation and psychological problems are often suggested to us as treatment for Bipolar Disorder.

They rarely work. It’s not that they can’t be part of a management plan, they can. But when it comes to addressing a first Bipolar Disorder mood swing and finding stability once you have a diagnosis, the goal is to regulate the brain chemistry that is creating the unstable moods.

We do this with medications, sleep regulation and trigger management. Take Charge of Bipolar Disorder explains this system.

Adding meditation, mindfulness and gratitude usually comes after a big episode has calmed down.


Julie is a pretty well regarded expert on bipolar disorder, with numerous books and articles on the subject. My wife's psychiatrist also agrees with this assessment. When my wife booked one-on-one therapy sessions with a DBT therapist, her therapist basically said that it is hard for her to absorb and practice DBT while in the throes of an acute depression and suggested they postpone the sessions until she is closer to baseline.

Again, I'm not saying that they don't work. They can be very helpful. But like Julie says, it is helpful as part of an overall management plan and not when you are already suffering through a mood swing.
 
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Ginger Kitten

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I don't think I've ever said to only use self-help measures in an acute phase, Keith, I never would. I was advocating self-help in the non-acute phase. When you develop insight through living with bp for a while, you can notice early warning signs and act to stave off an episode. I know what acute phases are like, I was once hospitalised. In that case, medication is the only thing that brings you back to any sort of normality.
Instead, I'm saying get to know yourself and your early signs of the illness and you can prevent experiencing the worst excesses of the illness. (I'm not saying you, I mean 'one', in your case, your wife.) There are many experts in the field of mental health, but nothing can replace the expertise you develop by living with bipolar disorder. I've had it 30 years now, though it was only diagnosed 8 and a half years ago. Almost 9 years is a long time to live alongside bipolar - you become something of an expert yourself by experience. I've replied to your other post btw - thank you.
 
G

Ginger Kitten

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PS, I've just looked Julie Fast up on the Net and she has lived experience of bipolar and schizoaffective order but no psychiatric or psychological qualifications. So what she says will simply be her own opinion and experience, backed up by the professionals she writes her books with. Do please be wary of 'expert' opinion. I tend to feel, in this area where people are so vulnerable, that the best expert opinion is the psychiatrist's - and even then, some people don't have a good experience with them. But at least they have nearly a decade of training, including in medicine. Take care. GK.
 
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keith74

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I don't think I've ever said to only use self-help measures in an acute phase, Keith, I never would. I was advocating self-help in the non-acute phase. When you develop insight through living with bp for a while, you can notice early warning signs and act to stave off an episode. I know what acute phases are like, I was once hospitalised. In that case, medication is the only thing that brings you back to any sort of normality.
Instead, I'm saying get to know yourself and your early signs of the illness and you can prevent experiencing the worst excesses of the illness. (I'm not saying you, I mean 'one', in your case, your wife.) There are many experts in the field of mental health, but nothing can replace the expertise you develop by living with bipolar disorder. I've had it 30 years now, though it was only diagnosed 8 and a half years ago. Almost 9 years is a long time to live alongside bipolar - you become something of an expert yourself by experience. I've replied to your other post btw - thank you.
Ah ok, then I think we are on the same page then. Yes, self-help can be very helpful in the non-acute phase in helping to prevent an acute episode. Totally agree with this no question.

As for Jule Fast, yes she is not a doctor. But she is quite recognized as someone with expertise on bipolar disorder. What I like about her is that she has bipolar and as you said, nothing can replace the expertise you develop by living with bipolar. I tend to find her advice pretty sound. She been researching and advocating since the late 90s. As many can attest on this forum, there are many psychiatrists who don't get it right when it comes to the best treatment for bipolar.
 
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Ginger Kitten

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As many can attest on this forum, there are many psychiatrists who don't get it right when it comes to the best treatment for bipolar.
Yes, I said that too Keith: I tend to feel, in this area where people are so vulnerable, that the best expert opinion is the psychiatrist's - and even then, some people don't have a good experience with them.

I think we're going round in circles a bit. As you said, we're in agreement. That's the best place to leave things.
 
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