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Re-Visioning Madness: Compassionately Responding to People in Extreme States

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Re-Visioning Madness: Compassionately Responding to People in Extreme States

An interesting event for those interested -

Re-Visioning Madness: Compassionately Responding to People in Extreme States | Esalen

Workshop Details

Esalen co-founders Richard Price and Michael Murphy envisioned Dick Price's experiences of madness to be of great potential value in helping others, and as a way to expand the human potential movement. As a result, Esalen became a hub in the exploration of alternative models of madness and the development of new ways to help people in extreme states. Michael Cornwall and David Lukoff have been involved in continuing this exploration for more than thirty years.

Workshop attendees will learn about new, ground-breaking research and contributions by pioneers like Price, Bateson, Laing, Perry, Silverman, Perls, Grof, and others who attended historic gatherings on madness at Esalen.

During collegial conversations, personal sharing, and interactive exercises, we can expand on the paradigms by which madness may be expressed, understood, and responded to, by drawing on heart-centered ways of "being with" an individual in an extreme state.

The primary goal of this weekend together is to renew and inspire each of us to go back into our communities to bring compassion to those we serve.

Note: All potential participants must first contact one of the faculty prior to registration. Please call or e-mail Michael at 707-853-6808 or [email protected], or call David at 707-364-2702.

Recommended reading: Laing, The Politics of Experience and the Bird of Paradise; Jung, The Red Book: A Reader's Edition; Perry, The Trials of the Visionary Mind; Grof, Spiritual Emergency: When Personal Transformation Becomes a Crisis.
 
BillFish

BillFish

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Sep 12, 2009
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An interesting event for those interested -

Re-Visioning Madness: Compassionately Responding to People in Extreme States | Esalen

Workshop Details

Esalen co-founders Richard Price and Michael Murphy envisioned Dick Price's experiences of madness to be of great potential value in helping others, and as a way to expand the human potential movement. As a result, Esalen became a hub in the exploration of alternative models of madness and the development of new ways to help people in extreme states. Michael Cornwall and David Lukoff have been involved in continuing this exploration for more than thirty years.

Workshop attendees will learn about new, ground-breaking research and contributions by pioneers like Price, Bateson, Laing, Perry, Silverman, Perls, Grof, and others who attended historic gatherings on madness at Esalen.

During collegial conversations, personal sharing, and interactive exercises, we can expand on the paradigms by which madness may be expressed, understood, and responded to, by drawing on heart-centered ways of "being with" an individual in an extreme state.

The primary goal of this weekend together is to renew and inspire each of us to go back into our communities to bring compassion to those we serve.

Note: All potential participants must first contact one of the faculty prior to registration. Please call or e-mail Michael at 707-853-6808 or [email protected], or call David at 707-364-2702.

Recommended reading: Laing, The Politics of Experience and the Bird of Paradise; Jung, The Red Book: A Reader's Edition; Perry, The Trials of the Visionary Mind; Grof, Spiritual Emergency: When Personal Transformation Becomes a Crisis.
I seriously think enviroment is key, I don't think novel treatments have a hope of being anymore affective than psychiatry without investment in altering an individuals enviroment even temporarily.The same applies to addiction issues me thinks. Someone in inner city abject poverty would respond much more positively if they could be placed in a calm countryside enviroment for a few months. Working with horses etc has been shown to be very beneficial. I think though that the problem is if such a program were to be implemented by local councils etc, they would become factories, or mass produce camps. Instead of trying to do everything for everyone, I think we should accept that they should implement the technique for the few,and not attempt to replicate it society wide. At least then, some will have the opportunity to truly experience a calming change of enviroment.

Excuse my grammar, I'm a self-taught cave man:p
 
Last edited:
Kerome

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Speaking of altering the environment in this context puts me in mind of the centre which I attended here in Holland. They would take people on for a six month stretch, giving a 9 to 3 pm day of activities which put you in a community of therapeutic community and work, basically a whole new environmental matrix for a large part of your day. And it was clearly beneficial for many people, especially the young people, where everyone could rediscover and redefine their identity within a new structure. People would change over the six months, become more confident, less a victim.

But it didn't help everyone. Some severe depressives were only helped a little, and some older people only adapted to the new environment without being changed by it so much. I think people are a little like clockwork mechanisms in some regard, that they wind down a bit as they get older and are less infused with the key energies of life.

Anyway a small place like such a centre can make a significant difference to the environment of a limited amount of people. There are only a few in Holland, maybe you don't need so many. But they needn't become factories, as long as the scale is kept small.
 
BillFish

BillFish

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 12, 2009
Messages
2,388
Speaking of altering the environment in this context puts me in mind of the centre which I attended here in Holland. They would take people on for a six month stretch, giving a 9 to 3 pm day of activities which put you in a community of therapeutic community and work, basically a whole new environmental matrix for a large part of your day. And it was clearly beneficial for many people, especially the young people, where everyone could rediscover and redefine their identity within a new structure. People would change over the six months, become more confident, less a victim.

But it didn't help everyone. Some severe depressives were only helped a little, and some older people only adapted to the new environment without being changed by it so much. I think people are a little like clockwork mechanisms in some regard, that they wind down a bit as they get older and are less infused with the key energies of life.

Anyway a small place like such a centre can make a significant difference to the environment of a limited amount of people. There are only a few in Holland, maybe you don't need so many. But they needn't become factories, as long as the scale is kept small.
Exactly, I think we should discard the idea of helping everyone and invest in such programs for small numbers. The idea of recovery in the countryside is hundreds of years old, in some places the "mad" worked on farms etc right back to 1700 hundreds, even my local health authority had a farm (now disused) I think abandoned in the 70's. Great accommodation, with single rooms, good food, on a secluded country estate alongside intensive counseling would be life changing for someone struggling in a poverty stricken inner city area.
 
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