Quietening the Mind

Kerome

Kerome

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#1
So I thought it would be worthwhile to collect some thoughts about this. It's something we as mental health sufferers have a unique amount of difficulty with, but perhaps people have also developed particular techniques to do with it.

Sight

Trance generators: swirly blob, open fireplaces, sea surf
Nature video journeys
Underwater fish ballet
Lava lamp
Gardens: zen gardens especially
Darkness (closing ones eyes)

Sound

Nature: rain, open fires, sea shoreline
Tibetan singing bowls
Trance music: many varieties
Binaural beats
Birdsong

Smells

Incense
Aromatherapy oils

I'm sure other people can come up with many more, but these are some of the things I sometimes use to calm my mind.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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#3
This audio track was developed to be super calming by a collaboration between musicians and a group of scientists. I really enjoy it. There is also a long version which is nice.

 
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#4
The core principles of my own contemplative / meditative / mindfulness practise -

Merely observing everything without judgement ('inner & outer' reality).
Allowance / Acceptance of what is - as it is - as is. Allow to be - everything is as it needs to be - everything is perfect as it is.
Watching the mind without identification - thoughts, feelings, emotions, sensations / senses.
Non-judgement
Non-attachment
Gratitude

A whole range of other principles that i try & focus on as well, But the above is the main contemplative practise.
 
Kerome

Kerome

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#5
The core principles of my own contemplative / meditative / mindfulness practise -

Merely observing everything without judgement ('inner & outer' reality).
Allowance / Acceptance of what is - as it is - as is. Allow to be - everything is as it needs to be - everything is perfect as it is.
Watching the mind without identification - thoughts, feelings, emotions, sensations / senses.
Non-judgement
Non-attachment
Gratitude

A whole range of other principles that i try & focus on as well, But the above is the main contemplative practise.
I think that's a really good summary of a meditative practice that does not concentrate energy in the head, or puts focus on the mind. It is quite a pure form of contemplation.

There are certain Buddhist practices of meditation that do cause you to concentrate or focus, i.e. expend effort within the head and the mind. So I wouldn't do a blanket recommendation of meditation techniques as means for decreasing the energy in the head or quietening the mind. But if you're an advanced mindfulness practitioner it will very likely work for you.

However, to gain the skills and the silence necessary to do really well in mindfulness isn't that straightforward with a mental health condition.
 
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I think that's a really good summary of a meditative practice that does not concentrate energy in the head, or puts focus on the mind. It is quite a pure form of contemplation.

There are certain Buddhist practices of meditation that do cause you to concentrate or focus, i.e. expend effort within the head and the mind. So I wouldn't do a blanket recommendation of meditation techniques as means for decreasing the energy in the head or quietening the mind. But if you're an advanced mindfulness practitioner it will very likely work for you.

However, to gain the skills and the silence necessary to do really well in mindfulness isn't that straightforward with a mental health condition.
Yes, there are all the practises to focus the attention / awareness / mind.

i was reading something the other day that there are some 120 different types of meditative practice within Buddhism.

Buddhism, as with Eastern Philosophy in general contains a vast amount of writings & practices.

i do also feel that the contemplative / meditative tradition is Universal & can be applied within a secular sense, & on very basic principles. i quite like the work of Alan Wallace -

Mind in the Balance | Santa Barbara Institute for Consciousness Studies

Toward the First Revolution in the Mind Sciences - YouTube

i also found the little book 'Meditation' by Sogyal Rinpoche very good -

i have kind of developed my own understanding, practise & cosmology as time has gone on, from the hodge podge of everything i have experienced, done & read.

There are i feel individual difficulties & complexities having a mental health - psychological / emotional condition, with the application of a spiritual practice. There are complexities to my diagnosis / condition / medication & the difficulties that i have. But then that is where a lot of the work & acceptance is.

i do try to bring everything always back to some very basic principles. i also try very much to focus on observing my own reactions & responses.
 

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