Pyschosis and my partner/ Quetiapine

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SarahV

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Dec 12, 2018
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Pontefract West Yorkshire
#1
Good morning,

Last night I had the worst type of conversation with my fiance about how his medication/mental illness is making him feel constantly angry at everyone and everything, he says he is constantly unhappy with everything even saying last night he wasnted to finish our relationship as he didnt know if he'd be happier on his own but felt like he was throwing it all away if he did. I have asked him to speak to his doctor/mental health team as he was taken off Risperdrone in May last year and put onto Quetiapine. He struggled initially with the side effects then he seemed fine after that, but he is having some real issues in the last couple of months with hearing voices, anger and unhappiness. He spoke to his doctors surgery yesterday but got a triage nurse who suggested he take a hot bath or socialise more which is zero help what so ever for him. I'm so worried for him, he needs helop but apparently his mental health worker is on sick for 2 weeks at the moment too....any suggestions please?
 
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coffeerox

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#2
Good morning,

Last night I had the worst type of conversation with my fiance about how his medication/mental illness is making him feel constantly angry at everyone and everything, he says he is constantly unhappy with everything even saying last night he wasnted to finish our relationship as he didnt know if he'd be happier on his own but felt like he was throwing it all away if he did. I have asked him to speak to his doctor/mental health team as he was taken off Risperdrone in May last year and put onto Quetiapine. He struggled initially with the side effects then he seemed fine after that, but he is having some real issues in the last couple of months with hearing voices, anger and unhappiness. He spoke to his doctors surgery yesterday but got a triage nurse who suggested he take a hot bath or socialise more which is zero help what so ever for him. I'm so worried for him, he needs helop but apparently his mental health worker is on sick for 2 weeks at the moment too....any suggestions please?
Hi. I came down with psychosis in late April 2018 & I was also put on seroquel about a month to a month and a half after that. I only stayed on seroquel for about two months and after that, I got off of it.

It sounds like your fiance is depressed. It's what I went through when I went through psychosis. It's called psychotic depression. Sadly the people who are supposed to diagnose these illnesses don't correctly identify them. Because they didn't correctly identify it, they couldn't provide me with the correct treatment.

The seroquel stopped or slowed down the voices temporarily but it did nothing to resolve the depression. In fact it made it worse because it blocks your neurotransmitters. Those neurotransmitters need to be regenerated & replenished, not blocked.

I digress. What your fiance really needs is to resolve the depression & the physical state that comes with the condition. He will need therapy to help sort out his issues. Once he comes to terms with his life and his situation, things can start going up rather than down. Therapy can be done on your own but you need to be self-critical & objective. Then be real about what you need to do to resolve those issues.

He will also need to go on a diet that is more nutritious & focused around supplying his body with what it needs to produce dopamine and serotonin.

Finally, he will need exercise as the process of exercise acts as stress relief & also kickstarts the healing that the body is naturally capable of. Oh I almost forgot, get some multivitamins and fish oil too.

All of these things help kickstart or speed up neurogenesis. By the way, his counselors were right about the social contact. Social contact was an integral part of my healing & it came to me right after I started taking seroquel. Activities and people who make you happy does go a long way towards recovery. Just have fun with this part because it can be anything. For me, I played card games with my friends & later played online games as well as watched Twitch streams.

Anywho, good luck and I hope things work out! At some point he'll get to where I'm at where the voices are only a small fraction of the day.
 
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SarahV

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#3
Thank you for your reply, i'll take any help i can get to try to help him through this. We were fine together at the start of last year, then he changed tablets, his grandad passed away after a short cancer battle, we are due to be married in May this year and i dont know if he's feeling pressure to move into my house (i'm not forcing him in any way, if he's happy staying in his flat then i have no issue with this...i own my home, he rents its just a financially better solution if thats what we end up doing). I dont know if it IS the tablets causing problems, if he's still grieving or if he just feels pressure in general. Do you think he needs to talk again to his doctor about changing medication? is there anything he could qupliment the quetiapine with to stop his mind racing all the time? I dont want us to fall apart because of this because we have had some fantastic times before this all happened.
 
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coffeerox

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#4
Do you think he needs to talk again to his doctor about changing medication?
Not really. If anything he should get off of it but that's just my opinion.

is there anything he could qupliment the quetiapine with to stop his mind racing all the time?
This is resolved not by medication. He has to learn to practice mindfulness. It is the practice of slowing down your thought processes to the point where you become an observer, even for your own thoughts. Achieving this will be up to him. What helps to kickstart this process is quiet time. Take an hour or so each day to take a walk. No music or anything. Focus on the environment & natural sounds. He'll eventually become aware of his own thoughts and become able to slow them down.
 
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SarahV

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#5
Thank you, he listens to a lot of punk/metal music and i dont always think that does him a lot of good. He also has a lot of faith and will listen to Christian songs. I'm just at a loss as to how to help him through this. I know we can be happy but how can i stop it being destroyed before we can get through it?
 
Cazcat

Cazcat

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#6
Hi,

My husband also suffers from episodes of psychosis and depression. Psychosis is a symptom of a number of different conditions and what works for one person doesn't necessarily work for another. There is a fair bit of trial and error in finding the right medication/treatment for each person. In our experience GPs are generally pretty rubbish at managing it. My advice would be to call his mental health team and explain what's happening, ask for a duty worker and explain that this can't wait for his worker to get back from sick leave. It's taken us a while to realise we can do this without him actually being at crisis point, but now we have it works much better as preventing a crisis is always best if possible for everyone. They may also be able to get him an urgent appointment with his psychiatrist if necessary.

My husband's last major relapse was triggered by a friends death, grief and any other type of emotional stress can definately be a trigger. Medication changes again are always difficult for my husband and tend to result in an increase in symptoms before the Docs get the right balance, and of course side effects can be unpleasant too. My husband does find mindfulness helpful, but it's not enough on it's own for him, he definately also needs medication. He's currently on Citalopram and Aripiprazole and that's been the best combination we have found for him in terms of good control of his symptoms without difficult side effects, but everyone responds differently.
 
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SarahV

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Pontefract West Yorkshire
#7
Thank you for your reply-every little helps and at the moment i feel lilke i need as much advice as i possibly can get. I feel like it has some to do with his Grandads death, i know he will often say how much he misses him and its only been since September. Im not in work on Friday and i'm tempted to do a sit in at his doctors until someone agrees to sepak to him/us, he isnt very forceful and if someone tells him no he just accepts it whereas i will keep at it until i am satisfied-basically i want to fight his corner to try to get him the best help possible. Do you think his mental health team would speak to me? if they would i'd be more than happy to speak with them to try to get him some sort of help. Thank you x
 
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coffeerox

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#8
I know we can be happy but how can i stop it being destroyed before we can get through it?
Well I'm sorry to tell you this but there is no final answer. I'm on month 9 and I'm still getting voices. However, what I can say is that I'm at a point where I'm happy and wanting to progress in life.

There's no "one solution", or medication that can fix it all. Real healing will take a lot of work on your fiance's part. Everything that I told you, I did for myself, and I'm sitting here with 99% hallucination free experience.
 
Cazcat

Cazcat

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#9
Do you think his mental health team would speak to me? if they would i'd be more than happy to speak with them to try to get him some sort of help. Thank you x
His mental health team (and his GP) have a duty of care to your partner to listen to your concerns. They can't give you any information without his permission, but they should listen to you. If he has specified to them that he is happy for you to be involved in his care then they can involve you more.

It would be worth asking your partner if he has a staying well plan or crisis/relapse prevention plan and if so if he is happy to share these with you.
 
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SarahV

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#10
I think he would be more than happy to let me speak to them. He is reluctant for other family members as he see's them as trying to take over his life but i think he knows i have his best interests at heart and only want to help. He's at my house now and i finish work in half an hour, i'll speak to him. Thank you for your advice x
 
Cazcat

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#11
Going forward so long as he is comfortable with it my advice would be to ensure you are aware of, what early signs are of him becoming unwell and what support he would find helpful in those situations. What is normal for him. How to get him help if he is too unwell do seek help himself (I have had to ask for my husband to be detained under the mental health act in the past). If he has any advanced directives or wishes, what these are and where to find the legal documentation for this if needed.

I don't know how your partners psychosis affects him and how well controlled it is, but I have found that when my husband is unwell it affects me as much as him and I have a support worker, purely to support my in being able to support him now. There are some really good books about, one I recommend is called My lovely wife, by Mark Lukash and is his experience of supporting his wife through psychosis.

It would be worth finding out if you are your partners 'nearest relative' too. This is a legal term under the mental health act (there's useful info on the Rethink Website). Currently he can not chose who this is, as his wife it will automatically be you. I was my husband's even before we were married but I'm not sure how it works with you not living together at present. A nearest relative can request a Mental Health Act Assessment, and request admission to a psychiatric ward if necessary, they can also request discharge from hospital on his behalf.

If he would be happy for his mental health team to speak to you about his care, he needs to ask his team to record this clearly, and ideally set it out in an advanced statement too, so that if he loses the ability to make his own decisions at any point it is clear that he wants you kept informed (If he does obviously).
 
Jbb79

Jbb79

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#12
Relapses are Tough, it can be many things, Illness But, also Life-troubles, Worries, General Anxiety x x

I Can't help Beyond this, Try to be observant, Reach your own conclusion, Then, Decide on Actions x xx
 
MeropeneM

MeropeneM

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#13
Not really. If anything he should get off of it but that's just my opinion.


This is resolved not by medication. He has to learn to practice mindfulness. It is the practice of slowing down your thought processes to the point where you become an observer, even for your own thoughts. Achieving this will be up to him. What helps to kickstart this process is quiet time. Take an hour or so each day to take a walk. No music or anything. Focus on the environment & natural sounds. He'll eventually become aware of his own thoughts and become able to slow them down.
Yep it's an advanced meditation technique where you find your fixed point or your reference point that remains unchanged from which you can observe changes in self. I do this all the time it's very useful but you cannot alter the state in which you are also, you can only observe it xD

There is a physicality about that, you need Risperidone to alter that state. From your unchanged viewpoint you can only observe what is, and compare it to what was, or to what you want it to be, but to change that which is, medication is required. I would be highly surprised if you can do this without drugs, there's only a bunch of people on Earth that claim they can, and I don't believe them xD

By physicality I mean, with your thoughts you cannot chop your arm off. Your levels of dopamine are like your arms.
 
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Jules5

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#14
Psychosis has isolation and withdraw from family as one affect. Do not let him push you away. Kindness, love and self sacrifice is upmost if you really love him. Go out of your way to show you care not just about his state of mind but as an aspiring person ready to live again in the comforts of your love.

He sounds like a Keeper and he is worth it. Hope all goes well for you