PTSD?

J

JasonR28

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I'm trying to piece together a lot of my health. The NHS who are useless and incompetent haven't really touched on it, even though it's a problem they are aware of (but I've said about them in another post).

What it is, is when my main family members were alive, they were unwell with degenerative illnesses. Their illnesses resulted in them having regular falls. I could be downstairs and one could go upstairs to sort out some bits in their room. Suddenly a loud bang or crash was heard, often followed by screaming. I'd go up and there they were, on the floor. Sometimes injured, other times in tears.

This was a regular thing with the family members for about 15 years until they passed away.

For quite some time now I think it adds to my anxiety and stuff. If I'm out and about and I hear a loud noise, the same feelings come back as I experienced when my family would have those falls. Feeling upset, on edge, shook up.


It's the same with coughing/retching sounds. My family had all sorts of different nasty types of meds. Often the side effects were extreme with vomiting/dry retching being a regular thing. It was horrendous to see. Mum was terrified, mostly crying out loud while it was happening and having it block up her throat so she couldn't breathe.

Out and about now I get very on edge and have that upset feeling when hearing someone coughing (As that's how these puking episodes started, a few coughs, into retching and so on).


Is that PTSD?
 
SunnyDaze

SunnyDaze

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Hi there.What you described sounds horrible and it gave me anxiety imagining what that must have been like for you.

PTSD? I don't think anyone here can say whether it is or not,only a professional can.I'm sorry you went through that though.
 
sadpunchingbag

sadpunchingbag

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not sure dude i dont like to throw around diagnosis online id look into getting tested via the right routes i have some fucked up flashbacks sort of like when you watch people on a tv show have a flashback it feels like that totally detached from reality not sure if you also experience that my one advise would be go to your local gp and ask for what you can do be persistent i know nhs are a bunch of tards at times but some of them are good
 
J

JasonR28

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Thanks all. The thing with the NHS is, they don't know anything. For anxiety, I had been misdiagnosed many times. Then one day I said to a GP 'I have chronic anxiety' which was then noted on my records as a diagnosis. It's the same with PTSD.

I don't even know how it gets diagnosed. I gathered it would be a MH team who does that? But when I see them, they spend 90% of the session telling me I'm being silly and making up barriers.

I don't quite experience flashbacks, I suppose it's more of an associated thing. So when there was a loud bang, I would be on edge and upset as I raced to help my family because I knew they had hit the floor hard. Even though they are gone, that still happens with loud noises. Almost like I felt like that for so long when a loud bang happened, it's become a natural reaction to any loud noise.
 
SunnyDaze

SunnyDaze

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This is what's required for a PTSD diagnosis in the US,not sure about elsewhere though.

All of the criteria are required for the diagnosis of PTSD. The following text summarizes the diagnostic criteria:
Criterion A: stressor (one required)
The person was exposed to: death, threatened death, actual or threatened serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence, in the following way(s):
  • Direct exposure
  • Witnessing the trauma
  • Learning that a relative or close friend was exposed to a trauma
  • Indirect exposure to aversive details of the trauma, usually in the course of professional duties (e.g., first responders, medics)
Criterion B: intrusion symptoms (one required)
The traumatic event is persistently re-experienced in the following way(s):
  • Unwanted upsetting memories
  • Nightmares
  • Flashbacks
  • Emotional distress after exposure to traumatic reminders
  • Physical reactivity after exposure to traumatic reminders
C: avoidance (one required)
Avoidance of trauma-related stimuli after the trauma, in the following way(s):
  • Trauma-related thoughts or feelings
  • Trauma-related external reminders
Criterion D: negative alterations in cognitions and mood (two required)
Negative thoughts or feelings that began or worsened after the trauma, in the following way(s):
  • Inability to recall key features of the trauma
  • Overly negative thoughts and assumptions about oneself or the world
  • Exaggerated blame of self or others for causing the trauma
  • Negative affect
  • Decreased interest in activities
  • Feeling isolated
  • Difficulty experiencing positive affect
  • Criterion E: alterations in arousal and reactivity
    Trauma-related arousal and reactivity that began or worsened after the trauma, in the following way(s):
    • Irritability or aggression
    • Risky or destructive behavior
    • Hypervigilance
    • Heightened startle reaction
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Difficulty sleeping
  • Criterion F: duration (required)
    Symptoms last for more than 1 month.
    Criterion G: functional significance (required)
    Symptoms create distress or functional impairment (e.g., social, occupational).
    Criterion H: exclusion (required)
    Symptoms are not due to medication, substance use, or other illness.







Two specifications:
  • Dissociative Specification In addition to meeting criteria for diagnosis, an individual experiences high levels of either of the following in reaction to trauma-related stimuli:
    • Depersonalization.Experience of being an outside observer of or detached from oneself (e.g., feeling as if "this is not happening to me" or one were in a dream).
    • Derealization.Experience of unreality, distance, or distortion (e.g., "things are not real").
  • Delayed Specification.Full diagnostic criteria are not met until at least six months after the trauma(s), although onset of symptoms may occur immediately
DSM-5 Criteria for PTSD | BrainLine
 
J

JasonR28

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Thanks.

It's a tough one to really get to from that list because I have so many issues.

A) Yes
B) Yes to a few (nightmares as well, but that's bereavement nightmares maybe?)
C) Probably but thoughts or feelings isn't avoidance?
D) Yes to 4, but again, could also be some other MH problem causing it.
E) Yes to 4 again, same.
F) Yep
G) Yep (but maybe due to other MH)
H) Yep
 
SunnyDaze

SunnyDaze

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The only way to know for sure whether it's PTSD or not is to be evaluated by a professional.You are right that it could be another mental illness and it's best to know in order to get proper treatment.

My PTSD has a huge impact on every aspect of my life.At times it can be debilitating.If your symptoms are greatly affecting you then I suggest you get help with it.

It's not something a person can self diagnose or self treat,its a pretty major disorder that gets worse without treatment.
 

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