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PTSD identified in Ancient Assyria - 3000 years ago

shaky

shaky

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Ancient Mesopotamian Texts Show PTSD May Be as Old as Combat Itself — NOVA Next | PBS

Researchers studying ancient Assyrian texts from Mesopotamia dating between 1300 BCE and 609 BCE—translated and assembled by JoAnn Scurlock and Burton Andersen in their 2005 book Diagnoses in Assyrian and Babylonian Medicine—discovered references to ancient soldiers afflicted with symptoms that sound remarkably similar to our current understanding of PTSD.
Assyrian_archers_CROP
Ancient Assyrian warriors suffered from PTSD after combat, over 3,000 years ago.

Walid Khalid Abdul-Hamid, an honorary senior lecturer in psychiatry at Queen Mary University of London, and Jamie Hacker Hughes, director of the Veterans and Families Institute at Anglia Ruskin University, published their findings just last month in the journal Early Science and Medicine.

Here’s James Gallagher, interviewing Hacker Hughes for BBC News:


“The sorts of symptoms after battle were very clearly what we would call now post-traumatic stress symptoms.

“They described hearing and seeing ghosts talking to them, who would be the ghosts of people they’d killed in battle – and that’s exactly the experience of modern-day soldiers who’ve been involved in close hand-to-hand combat.”
 
SomersetScorpio

SomersetScorpio

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I find this really interesting, thanks for sharing the link.

I suppose somewhere in my mind I think there's this idea that our pre-historic people were often violent - you know the screaming warrior running into battle naked stereotype?:rolleyes:
And so going by that, you'd think that people were less sensitive to gore and the like.

But this kind of changes my perception... people were traumatised by seeing death and engaging in battle.
So perhaps our violent impulses aren't natural as some people might argue?

It fascinating. I wonder where things started to change, when the hunter became the soldier and how our minds coped with that.

Sorry if that's just waffling.. I know what i'm talking about anyway. :LOL:
 
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