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Psychosis and personality disorder

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Lou

Guest
I've noticed that some researchers [ie Imperial College] are putting psychosis and personality disorder together as two co-existing conditions.
Others state that psychosis can exist within PD or that both conditions represent a 'distorted' view of reality, or that people with PD can be psychotic.
I don't think this is helpful and I feel the entire PD category should be removed from DSM and ICD as much as Schizophrenia, if not more so, because the discrimination against people labelled as PD is acute.
Replacing Schizophrenia with anxiety/sensitivity/trauma/drug-related psychosis is a good realistic and practical step foward because British and American psychiatry would never drop Schizophrenia without a replacement, and these sub groups offer some real world meaning and context, anyone can grasp words such as anxiety, sensitivity and trauma. My only caveat is that trauma needs to have a wider understanding and not be fixated on sexual abuse to the exclusion of more 'ordinary' forms of trauma.
I think we also need to consider the use of the word psychosis too, especially in relation to recovery because recovery from psychosis contradicts itself given one word is medical and the other is alleged to represent a more social model. When people use the word psychosis they can mean very different things, some say it from a biological standpoint and others do not.
 
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Sue

Active member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
26
Hi Lou

I agree totally and without reservation. I think you have put that very well.

Sue
 
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terri

Guest
Hi Sue and Lou

Just a suggestion but why not rename schizophrenia swedenbourg. What do you think?:) Wouldn't it be brill to rename schizophrenia with a really special name/word to help kill prejudice?

Terri x
 
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terri

Guest
Hi girls, just to add

I know this is a topic for academics but I'd just like to say why not rename schizophrenia, swedenbourg in honour of everything he achieved and psychosis, merely having mind eye open.

We could call it MEO.

Bye for now

Terri
 
P

Paul

Guest
Regarding Swedenborg - did you see the article on the INTERVOICE website?

Talking back to the spirits: the voices and visions of Emanuel Swedenborg

In this recently published research paper Simon Jones and Charles Fernyhough tell how 300 years ago, Emanuel Swedenborg, the famous mystic, scientist, inventor and theologian, experienced three decades of voices and visions.

They show how the idea of ‘hallucinations in the sane’ which appeared in the mid-1800s in France, has been resurrected in the work of Romme and Escher and they argue that Swedenborg can be seen as having ‘hallucinations without mental disorder’ asking what can be learned from Swedenborg’s experiences and from those who experience voices and visions today?

See the article
here
 
L

Lou

Guest
Hi Sue & Terri,
Renaming, more reframing is certainly a topic for all of us not only the academics, especially for those of us who have diagnosed as such. I take your point about
swedenbourg but it would mean knowing about this person, I think we need words with more 'universal' recognition which is why anxiety, sensitivity, trauma and drug related psychosis gets my vote. Also because it has the best chance of succeeding replacement of Schizophrenia. I try to go for ordinary language wherever possible, plain english, to describe experience, because I think we need to use accessible words.
 
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Lily may

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
8
i agree with you all, as i live in fear of being labeled as schizophrenic as i know the negative impact it would have on me and those around me.

although i do believe its not just the names that need challenging but peoples views of what they mean, mental health profesionals included.

maybe tho if the names where changed to something people could more easily understand, i think one of you mentioned plain english, then people would perhaps think twice before coungering up the steriotypes?

sorry if ive just repeated anything youve already said but wanted to add something!

take care all
Lily may
 
C

calfellows

Guest
Lily May,
BiPolar Type2 is a common diagnosis for Voice Hearers with Depression. You might want to do some research, just for peace of mind. Racing thoughts, I was once treated for Tourette's Syndrome.
Take Care,
Cal
 
S

Sue

Active member
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
Messages
26
Although giving something a name can be useful i.e. for employment/benefits/medication etc etc - I would prefer not to get tied to a particular label because then you find it follows you for life. Anyway if you look at the ICD - 10/Psychiatric textbooks you would probably find that you have signs/symptoms/criteria for many different disorders/illnesses. Mental Health is a complex area and too much power has been given to medicine - medicine doesn't have all the answers.
 
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Lou

Guest
You're right Sue, unfortunately whilst ALL social supports are tied to needing a medical diagnosis we can't escape it, therefore we need health workers who have to make those diagnoses who are capable of 'dual thinking' - diagnosis to help people to get the social supports they need, then outside of that working within the voice hearers frame of reference, using their preferred language and terms for the emotional support.
 
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Lily may

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
8
Cal, thanks, will look that up.
 
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SiJones

New member
Joined
Dec 3, 2008
Messages
4
Re: Psychosis and reframing

I think another problem with the term 'psychosis' is that it tends to create an artificial iron curtain between 'psychotic experiences' and 'normal experiences'.

For example, the majority of the population will have had the experience of hearing a voice just before they are about to fall asleep or just as they are waking up. So most people will have some inkling of what hearing voices may be like.

However, when people in the general population hear someone described as having psychosis this makes it more likely they will not be able to relate to what the person is going through, adding to stigma.

Anyone else have any thoughts on this?
 
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terri

Guest
Re: Psychosis and reframing

I think another problem with the term 'psychosis' is that it tends to create an artificial iron curtain between 'psychotic experiences' and 'normal experiences'.

For example, the majority of the population will have had the experience of hearing a voice just before they are about to fall asleep or just as they are waking up. So most people will have some inkling of what hearing voices may be like.

However, when people in the general population hear someone described as having psychosis this makes it more likely they will not be able to relate to what the person is going through, adding to stigma.

Anyone else have any thoughts on this?
Hi Lily May

sisohcysp - this means that you are under extreme stress and that is when adreneline goes overboard which causes you to see things. I've spelt it backwards because I do not think the term psychosis by the psychiatrist's definition exists any longer because I have a family member who see things all the while but know that is caused by the amount of stress she is under at the moment through death, illness in my family and as she is a 'natural worrier' this adds to the stress so I think we should all chill out and stop getting so strung up about psychosis and what it all implies by the medical profession. I hope everyone respects my opinion. Think of the mirages in the desert through lack of water? Surely, people such as the bushmen, aboriginals, indigenous tribes etc. are not psychotic or called by this term either and they dream all the while too which is another reason why I do not believe we have psychosis. Sisohcysp from now on, that's what I say. Could we have a poll to see if anyone agrees with me pleae Paul?


Lots of love Terri x
 
T

terri

Guest
Although giving something a name can be useful i.e. for employment/benefits/medication etc etc - I would prefer not to get tied to a particular label because then you find it follows you for life. Anyway if you look at the ICD - 10/Psychiatric textbooks you would probably find that you have signs/symptoms/criteria for many different disorders/illnesses. Mental Health is a complex area and too much power has been given to medicine - medicine doesn't have all the answers.
Hey Sue

Couldn't agree with you more. Once diagnosed with schizophrenia the majority of people's perception of you changes: for instance, if you start talking to yourself if just mulling some thoughts through (which the majority of people do anyway) you start to become observed to see whether you are ill or not!!

I find it really hard to cope with the prejudice surrounding people like us and have in the past lost my cool; yes another sign in 'normal' people's eyes that you are ill if you have been labelled schizophrenic. Who was it who came up with the theory that if you show no emotion, talk to yourself, get angry, laugh out loud, hear voices, walk around in a dream, etc. etc. etc. - you all know the score - you are schizophrenic? Well, he wants shooting in my opinion, but he's probably dead already, so no point becoming violent.

I can't help but want to 'punch the lights out' (once again metaphorically speaking - don't want to be carted off to the police station) of people who look at me in a pitying way and say in that certain wimpish tone of voice, are you alright and when you say yes, they answer 'are you sure'. Well, I guess it just gets my goat because I look at them and wonder why they think I'm insane when I know they are two tanners short of a shilling. Lol

A really 'not so funny' incident happened to me once. I had a disagreement with a colleague of mine at work and was trying to put my point of view across, not angrily, but in a firm tone, when another colleague came into the staff room and did no more than remove all the knives from the drawer in the kitchen. I could hardly believe it and stood and looked at her in disbelief. Prejudice. Oh how we suffer, it's enough to send you mental, lol

Thanks for giving me the opportunity to let off steam

Take care

Terri x (Still off the tablets - 2 years plus and counting)
 
L

Lily may

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
8
thanks Terri, perhaps we can spell Schizophrenia backwards to?

although to be honest i have enough trouble spelling them as it is, let alone trying to pronounce it!
ah, maybe then people will be worrying to much about how to say it that they wont make any judgements. lol
 
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